102 research outputs found

    End-to-end Learning for Short Text Expansion

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    Effectively making sense of short texts is a critical task for many real world applications such as search engines, social media services, and recommender systems. The task is particularly challenging as a short text contains very sparse information, often too sparse for a machine learning algorithm to pick up useful signals. A common practice for analyzing short text is to first expand it with external information, which is usually harvested from a large collection of longer texts. In literature, short text expansion has been done with all kinds of heuristics. We propose an end-to-end solution that automatically learns how to expand short text to optimize a given learning task. A novel deep memory network is proposed to automatically find relevant information from a collection of longer documents and reformulate the short text through a gating mechanism. Using short text classification as a demonstrating task, we show that the deep memory network significantly outperforms classical text expansion methods with comprehensive experiments on real world data sets.Comment: KDD'201

    LINE: Large-scale Information Network Embedding

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    This paper studies the problem of embedding very large information networks into low-dimensional vector spaces, which is useful in many tasks such as visualization, node classification, and link prediction. Most existing graph embedding methods do not scale for real world information networks which usually contain millions of nodes. In this paper, we propose a novel network embedding method called the "LINE," which is suitable for arbitrary types of information networks: undirected, directed, and/or weighted. The method optimizes a carefully designed objective function that preserves both the local and global network structures. An edge-sampling algorithm is proposed that addresses the limitation of the classical stochastic gradient descent and improves both the effectiveness and the efficiency of the inference. Empirical experiments prove the effectiveness of the LINE on a variety of real-world information networks, including language networks, social networks, and citation networks. The algorithm is very efficient, which is able to learn the embedding of a network with millions of vertices and billions of edges in a few hours on a typical single machine. The source code of the LINE is available online.Comment: WWW 201
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