190 research outputs found

    THE VALUE OF SPORT FISHING IN THE SNAKE RIVER BASIN OF CENTRAL IDAHO

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    The value of sportfishing in the Snake River Basin in Central Idaho was measured using a two-stage/disequilibrium travel model. The two-stage/disequilibrium model does not require monetization of recreationists? travel time as required of traditional equilibrium labor market travel cost models. The model was estimated using Poisson regression, appropriate for count data when over-dispersion is absent, and adjusted for endogenous stratification (self selection bias) . Contrary to expectations that anglers living close to the sites with low values would be over represented in the sample, the endogenous stratification adjustment caused estimated consumers surplus to decline from 42perpersonpertripbeforeadjustmentforendogenousstratificationto42 per person per trip before adjustment for endogenous stratification to 35 after adjustment. The average number of sportfishing trips per year was 6.72, resulting in an average annual willingness-to-pay of $236 per year per angler.Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    Measuring the Location Value of a Recreation Site

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    The demand for sport fishing on the Snake River reservoirs was estimated using the travel cost method. A short-run demand model was specified with location value for anglers who have the option to access a follow-on site if fishing conditions are poor. Willingness to pay for a fishing trip to the site was 18.52foranglerswhodidnothaveafollowonsiteand18.52 for anglers who did not have a follow-on site and 43.48 for anglers who did. A location value of 24.96accruedonlytoanglerswithafollowonsite.Totalannualsitevaluewasunderstatedbyasmuchas4024.96 accrued only to anglers with a follow-on site. Total annual site value was understated by as much as 40% (0.78 million) if location value for anglers with a follow-on site was excluded from the benefit estimate.contingent behavior, count data, endogenous stratification, follow-on site, location value, multiple destination, option value, short-run demand, travel cost method, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    ISSUES IN NONMARKET VALUATION AND POLICY APPLICATION: A RETROSPECTIVE GLANCE

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    While issues in estimating nonmarket values continue to cause concern, resource economists have more reason now than ever before to be optimistic. More progress toward improved measurement has been made in the past six years than in the previous quarter century since development of the contingent valuation and travel cost methods. The new challenge is to learn how to adjust past studies to estimate nonmarket values for future policy analysis. The process involves developing an understanding of the important variables that explain the observed difference in estimates. This paper illustrates how the results thus far could be adjusted to develop some tentative estimates of the recreation-use value of Forest Service resources.Research Methods/ Statistical Methods, Resource /Energy Economics and Policy,

    Economy of Albany, Carbon, and Sweetwater counties, Wyoming, The: description and analysis

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    Submitted to U.S. Dept. of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Colorado State Office, Denver, Colorado.Bibliography: pages 74-76.Contract no. YA-510-PH8-57

    Economy of Albany, Carbon and Fremont counties, Wyoming, Rawlins BLM district, The

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    May 1983.Submitted to U.S. Dept. of Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Colorado State Office.Bibliography: pages 60-64.Contract no. YA-553-CT0-1077

    Direct and indirect economic effects of hunting and fishing in Colorado--1981

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    Includes bibliographical references

    Economy of Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater and Uinita counties, Wyoming: Rock Springs BLM district, The

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    Submitted to U.S. Dept. of Interior, Bureau of Land Management.May 1983.Contract Nos. YA-553-CT0-1077 and YA-553-CT1-1088

    Economic impacts of a rural-to-urban water transfer: a case study of Crowley County, Colorado

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    November, 1993.Includes bibliographical references (pages 49-51).Urban water supply agencies seeking to meet growing municipal water demands in the arid southwest are finding that the purchase of water from existing agricultural uses is, from their perspective, often more cost-effective than construction of additional storage. Colorado municipalities have been among the most active purchasers of irrigation water rights. Agriculture-to-urban water transfers have economic impacts at the local, regional and state levels. Although the transfers represent "willing buyer-willing seller" exchanges, and represent a gain for both parties to the transactions, concerns have been voiced over whether the economic values of the transacting entities fully take into account the values to the region and the state. Starting in the 1970s, water for urban use has been purchased in Crowley County, a small rural county in southeastern Colorado. Crowley County lands are irrigated from the Lower Arkansas River via the Colorado Canal. Some 85% of the water rights formerly serving 47,000 irrigated acres in Crowley County have been purchased by municipalities. This study had two main purposes. The first was to employ a nonmarket valuation technique to estimate the foregone direct economic benefits (opportunity costs) of irrigation water used in Crowley County. The second purpose was to estimate regional (direct plus secondary) employment impacts of the reduced irrigated agriculture.Grant no. 14-08-0001-GI551, Project no. 06; financed in part by the U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Geological Survey, through the Colorado Water Resources Research Institute

    Economic impacts of agriculture-to-urban water transfers: a case study of Crowley County, Colorado

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    November 1993.Includes bibliographical references (pages 49-51).Grant no. 14-08-0001-G1551, project 06
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