114 research outputs found

    Open Primaries

    Get PDF
    Examines arguments for and against proposed reforms to state and U.S. House and Senate primaries that would allow voters to choose a candidate regardless of party affiliation, with the top two proceeding to a runoff election. Estimates moderation effects

    California's Political Geography

    Get PDF
    Based on PPIC Statewide Survey data, outlines regional variations in party representation in the U.S. Congress and the state legislature, residents' party affiliation, and ideology on social and fiscal issues. Considers electoral implications

    Open primaries do little to encourage candidate moderation

    Get PDF
    Many blame the ongoing polarization of Congress on the system of primary election that often rewards the most extreme candidates on either side. But are “open” primaries, where more than just regular partisans can participate the solution to this polarization? Using data from two decades of state-level experimentation with primary laws, Eric McGhee finds that primary races that are “pure closed” can actually result in candidates that are slightly closer together ideologically than those that are “pure open”. Despite this, California has found some success with open primaries increasing moderation among party nominees, and it may well signal the conditions for success

    Reflections on "Redistricting and Legislative Partisanship"

    Get PDF

    How Much Does the Public Know about the State Budget, and Does It Matter?

    Get PDF

    Non-Retrogression Without Law

    Get PDF
    For five straight cycles (the 1970s through the 2010s), Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act dominated redistricting in states covered by the provision. In these states, district plans had to be precleared with federal authorities before they could be implemented. Preclearance was granted only if plans wouldn’t retrogress, that is, reduce minority representation. Thanks to the Supreme Court’s 2013 decision in Shelby County v. Holder, Section 5 is no longer operative. So what happened to minority representation in formerly covered states after Section 5’s protections were withdrawn? This Article is the first to tackle this important question. We examine all states’ district plans before and after the 2020 round of redistricting at the congressional, state senate, and state house levels. Our primary finding is that there was little retrogression in formerly covered states. In sum, the number of minority ability districts in these states actually rose slightly. We also show that formerly covered states were largely indistinguishable from formerly uncovered states in terms of retrogression. If anything, states unaffected by Shelby County retrogressed marginally more than did states impacted by the ruling. Lastly, we begin to probe some of the factors that might explain this surprising pattern. One possible explanation is the status quo bias of many mapmakers, which is reflected in their tendency to keep minority representation constant. Another potential driver is many line-drawers’ reluctance to use retrogression as a partisan weapon. This reluctance is evident in the similar records of all redistricting authorities with respect to retrogression, as well as in the absence of any relationship between retrogression and change in plans’ partisan performance

    Inertial and Magnetic Posture Tracking for Inserting Humans Into Networked Virtual Environments

    Get PDF
    Proceedings of ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software & Technology (VRST 2001), Banff, Alberta, Canada, 15 - 17 November 2001, pp.9-16.Accepted/Published Conference Pape

    Development of an inducible mouse model of iRFP713 to track recombinase activity and tumour development in vivo

    Get PDF
    While the use of bioluminescent proteins for molecular imaging is a powerful technology to further our understanding of complex processes, fluorescent labeling with visible light fluorescent proteins such as GFP and RFP suffers from poor tissue penetration and high background autofluorescence. To overcome these limitations, we generated an inducible knock-in mouse model of iRFP713. This model was used to assess Cre activity in a Rosa Cre-ER background and quantify Cre activity upon different tamoxifen treatments in several organs. We also show that iRFP can be readily detected in 3D organoid cultures, FACS analysis and in vivo tumour models. Taken together we demonstrate that iRFP713 is a progressive step in in vivo imaging and analysis that widens the optical imaging window to the near-infrared spectrum, thereby allowing deeper tissue penetration, quicker image acquisition without the need to inject substrates and a better signal to background ratio in genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs)
    • …
    corecore