6 research outputs found

    The Socio-Economic Role of Burial Societies and Money Lending Clubs in the Informal Sector in Lesotho

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    The role of state and non-state actors in the sustenance of the expanded program on immunization (EPI) in Lesotho, Southern Africa

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    This study takes cognizance of the lingering crisis and politics in governing health sector system in sub-Saharan Africa. It articulates the role of the state and civil society groups in primary health provisioning and investigates the questions “how”, “what”, “why” and “who” that matter in Lesotho, where 83 percent of the population live in rural areas. The study utilized secondary clinical data at the national level as the basis for analysis which involved a lengthy desktop analysis of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) clinic data and records. Data sources indicate that Lesotho’s primary health care system is grassroot-oriented in implementation, with a very functional community health and voluntary health worker system. Close collaboration was also found to exist between the state organs and the Christian Health Association of Lesotho (CHAL) across the entire platform of health care delivery. The study identified the existence of some peculiar socio-environmental factors such as poor coordination, suspicion and communication gaps - among others - which are impeding the progress of the EPI in spite of the cordial relationship which exists between the state and other stakeholders/role-players

    No. 21: The State of Poverty and Food Insecurity in Maseru, Lesotho

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    This report on food insecurity in urban Lesotho is the latest in a series on Southern African cities issued by AFSUN. Like the previous reports, it focuses on one city (Maseru) and on poor neighbourhoods and households in that city. More than 60% of poor households surveyed in Maseru were severely food insecure. While food price increases worsen food insecurity for poor households, it is poverty that weakens the resilience of society to absorb these increases. This report argues that Maseru residents face specific and interrelated challenges with respect to food and nutrition insecurity. These are poverty; limited local livelihood opportunities; and dependence on food imports. Among AFSUN’s recommendations are improved infrastructure as a fundamental precondition for meaningful development; the creation of livelihood opportunities within the food system; social safety nets designed in ways that promote economic growth and equity; and free movement of labour between Lesotho and South Africa, which would dramatically improve the incomes of many poor households. The Government of Lesotho and the Maseru Municipality and District can direct both aid and investment into an integrated food security strategy that prioritizes urban infrastructure, livelihoods, welfare and mobility. This takes political will, but the development and implementation of such a food security strategy is well within the reach of the country’s leaders

    The State of Poverty and Food Insecurity in Maseru, Lesotho

    Get PDF
    This report on food insecurity in urban Lesotho is the latest in a series on Southern African cities issued by AFSUN. Like the previous reports, it focuses on one city (Maseru) and on poor neighbourhoods and households in that city. More than 60% of poor households surveyed in Maseru were severely food insecure. While food price increases worsen food insecurity for poor households, it is poverty that weakens the resilience of society to absorb these increases. This report argues that Maseru residents face specific and interrelated challenges with respect to food and nutrition insecurity. These are poverty; limited local livelihood opportunities; and dependence on food imports. Among AFSUN’s recommendations are improved infrastructure as a fundamental precondition for meaningful development; the creation of livelihood opportunities within the food system; social safety nets designed in ways that promote economic growth and equity; and free movement of labour between Lesotho and South Africa, which would dramatically improve the incomes of many poor households. The Government of Lesotho and the Maseru Municipality and District can direct both aid and investment into an integrated food security strategy that prioritizes urban infrastructure, livelihoods, welfare and mobility. This takes political will, but the development and implementation of such a food security strategy is well within the reach of the country’s leaders

    Gender and Household Resource Management in Lesotho

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    Household resource management in Lesotho is governed by the cultural practices that place members of the different gender at extremes, with the wife managing the domestic intra-familial activities, while the husband, since he is the household head, managing the inter-household activities. Decision-making and implementation are determined by the nature of activity and who according to cultural practices should be responsible. Level of education of the wife at intra-household level tends not to be a major determining factor of how decisions would be implemented. The level of education of the husband shapes the level at which decisions take place. A highly educated husband to a large extent may decide with his wife on what activities should be implemented and by whom. However, if the level of education of the wife is below that of the husband there seems to be a highly skewed nature of relationships regarding planning and implementation of household activities. The paper discusses management of land, labour, water, livestock, finances and firewood by both men and women in the rural and urban areas. The argument is that management of resources could be influenced by residential area whether in the rural or urban areas. In addition to this, the prolonged absence from home of the household head would also affect decisions as well as their implementation on time. The delay on the part of one of the decision-makers could constitute a take-over by the other household member. Such an action could constitute family problems, as the other party could personally feel undermined, or be viewed as being inefficient. (Review of Southern African Studies: 2000 4 (1): 133-159
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