74 research outputs found

    Nurses are Key Members of the Abortion Care Team: Why aren’t Schools of Nursing Teaching Abortion Care?

    Get PDF
    Abortion is a common and safe procedure in Canada, with the Canadian Institute for Health Information reporting approximately 100,000 procedures per year. Yet access remains problematic. As abortion is unrestricted by criminal law in Canada, access is limited by geographic barriers and by a shortage of providers. We present a feminist critical lens to describe how the marginalization of nursing and nurses in abortion care contributes to social stigma and public misunderstanding about abortion access. The roles of registered nurses and nurse practitioners in abortion advocacy, service navigation, counselling, education, support, physiological care and follow up are underutilized and under-researched. In 2015, decades after its availability elsewhere in the world, Health Canada approved mifepristone (a pill for medical abortion). In 2017, provincial regulators began to authorize nurse practitioners to independently provide medical abortion care, as appropriate given the inclusion in nurse practitioner scope of practice to order diagnostic tests, make diagnoses, and treat health conditions. Ensuring nurse practitioners are able to practice medical abortion has the potential to significantly increase abortion access for rural, remote and other marginalized populations. There is also an opportunity to optimize the registered nurse role in abortion care. However, achieving these improvements is challenging as abortion is not routinely taught in Canadian Schools of Nursing. We argue that to destigmatize abortion and improve access, undergraduate nursing and nurse practitioner programs across the country must begin to include abortion and family planning competencies

    Integrating health geography and behavioral economic principles to strengthen context-specific behavior change interventions

    Get PDF
    The long-term economic viability of modern health care systems is uncertain, in part due to costs of health care at the end of life and increasing health care utilization associated with an increasing population prevalence of multiple chronic diseases. Control of health care spending and sustaining delivery of health care services will require strategic investments in prevention to reduce the risk of disease and its complications over an individual's life course. Behavior change interventions aimed at reducing a range of harmful and risky health-related behaviors including smoking, physical inactivity, excess alcohol consumption, and excess weight, are one approach that has proven effective at reducing risk and preventing chronic disease. However, large-scale efforts to reduce population-level chronic diseases are challenging and have not been very successful at reducing the burden of chronic diseases. A new approach is required to identify when, where, and how to intervene to disrupt patterns of behavior associated with high-risk factors using context-specific interventions that can be scaled. This paper introduces the need to integrate theoretical and methodological principles of health geography and behavioral economics as opportunities to strengthen behavior change interventions for the prevention of chronic diseases. We discuss how health geography and behavioral economics can be applied to expand existing behavior change frameworks and how behavior change interventions can be strengthened by characterizing contexts of time and activity space

    Resident and family perceptions of the nurse practitioner role in long term care settings: a qualitative descriptive study

    Get PDF
    BACKGROUND: Research evidence supports the positive impact on resident outcomes of nurse practitioners (NPs) working in long term care (LTC) homes. There are few studies that report the perceptions of residents and family members about the role of the NP in these settings. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of residents and family members regarding the role of the NP in LTC homes. METHODS: The study applied a qualitative descriptive approach. In-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 35 residents and family members from four LTC settings that employed a NP. Conventional content analysis was used to identify themes and sub-themes. RESULTS: Two major themes were identified: NPs were seen as providing resident and family-centred care and as providing enhanced quality of care. NPs established caring relationships with residents and families, providing both informational and emotional support, as well as facilitating their participation in decision making. Residents and families perceived the NP as improving availability and timeliness of care and helping to prevent unnecessary hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: The perceptions of residents and family members of the NP role in LTC are consistent with the concepts of person-centred and relationship-centred care. The relationships NPs develop with residents and families are a central means through which enhanced quality of care occurs. Given the limited use of NPs in LTC settings, there is an opportunity for health care policy and decision makers to address service inadequacies through strategic deployment of NPs in LTC settings. NPs can use their expert knowledge and skill to assist residents and families to make informed choices regarding their health care and maintain a positive care experience

    Action Planning for Daily Mouth Care in Long-Term Care: The Brushing Up on Mouth Care Project

    Get PDF
    Research focusing on the introduction of daily mouth care programs for dependent older adults in long-term care has met with limited success. There is a need for greater awareness about the importance of oral health, more education for those providing oral care, and organizational structures that provide policy and administrative support for daily mouth care. The purpose of this paper is to describe the establishment of an oral care action plan for long-term care using an interdisciplinary collaborative approach. Methods. Elements of a program planning cycle that includes assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation guided this work and are described in this paper. Findings associated with assessment and planning are detailed. Assessment involved exploration of internal and external factors influencing oral care in long-term care and included document review, focus groups and one-on-one interviews with end-users. The planning phase brought care providers, stakeholders, and researchers together to design a set of actions to integrate oral care into the organizational policy and practice of the research settings. Findings. The establishment of a meaningful and productive collaboration was beneficial for developing realistic goals, understanding context and institutional culture, creating actions suitable and applicable for end-users, and laying a foundation for broader networking with relevant stakeholders and health policy makers

    Enfermagem com prática avançada : uma estratégia para atingir cobertura universal de saúde e acesso universal à saúde

    Get PDF
    Objetivo: examinar el rol de la enfermería con práctica avanzada (EPA) a nivel internacional para informar de su desarrollo en América Latina y el Caribe, en apoyo a la cobertura de salud universal y el acceso universal a la salud. Método: se analizó la literatura relacionada con los roles de la EPA, su despliegue en el mundo y la eficacia de EPA en relación con la cobertura de salud universal y el acceso a la salud. Resultados: dada la evidencia de su eficacia en muchos países, las funciones de la EPA son ideales como parte de una estrategia de recursos humanos de atención primaria de salud en América Latina para mejorar la cobertura de salud universal y el acceso a la salud. Brasil, Chile, Colombia y México están bien posicionados para construir esta fuerza de trabajo. Las barreras a la implementación de estas funciones incluyen: la falta de claridad de su rol, la legislación/regulación, educación, financiamiento, y la resistencia de los médicos. Se necesita un liderazgo fuerte de enfermería para alinear los roles de la EPA con las políticas prioritarias, y trabajar en colaboración con los profesionales de atención primaria y los responsables de las políticas para la implementación exitosa de sus funciones. Conclusiones: teniendo en cuenta la diversidad de los contextos en diferentes naciones, es importante evaluar sistemáticamente las necesidades de salud del país y de la población para introducir la combinación más adecuada y complementaria de los papeles de la EPA y dar un formato a su aplicación. La introducción con éxito del papel de la EPA en América Latina y el Caribe podría proporcionar una hoja de ruta para funciones similares en otros países de bajos/medios ingresos.Objetivo: analisar o papel da enfermagem com prática avançada (EPA) a nível internacional para um relatório do seu desenvolvimento na América Latina e no Caribe, para apoiar a cobertura universal de saúde e o acesso universal à saúde. Método: análise da bibliografia relacionada com os papéis da EPA, sua implantação no mundo e a eficácia da EPA em relação à cobertura universal de saúde e acesso à saúde. Resultados: dada a evidência da sua eficácia em muitos países, as funções da EPA são ideais como parte de uma estratégia de recursos humanos de atenção primária de saúde na América Latina para melhorar a cobertura universal de saúde e o acesso à saúde. Brasil, Chile, Colômbia e México estão bem posicionados para construir esta força de trabalho. Barreiras à implementação destas funções incluem: a falta de clareza do seu papel, a legislação/regulamentação, educação, financiamento, e a resistência médica. Uma liderança forte de enfermagem é necessária para alinhar o papel da EPA com as prioridades políticas e trabalhar em colaboração com os profissionais de atenção primária e os decisores políticos para a implementação bem sucedida das suas funções. Conclusões: dada a diversidade de contextos dos diferentes países, é importante avaliar sistematicamente as necessidades de saúde do país e da população para introduzir a combinação mais adequada e complementar dos papéis da EPA e formatar sua aplicação. A introdução bem sucedida do papel da EPA na América Latina e no Caribe poderia fornecer um roteiro para funções semelhantes noutros países de baixa/média renda.Objective: to examine advanced practice nursing (APN) roles internationally to inform role development in Latin America and the Caribbean to support universal health coverage and universal access to health. Method: we examined literature related to APN roles, their global deployment, and APN effectiveness in relation to universal health coverage and access to health. Results: given evidence of their effectiveness in many countries, APN roles are ideally suited as part of a primary health care workforce strategy in Latin America to enhance universal health coverage and access to health. Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Mexico are well positioned to build this workforce. Role implementation barriers include lack of role clarity, legislation/regulation, education, funding, and physician resistance. Strong nursing leadership to align APN roles with policy priorities, and to work in partnership with primary care providers and policy makers is needed for successful role implementation. Conclusions: given the diversity of contexts across nations, it is important to systematically assess country and population health needs to introduce the most appropriate complement and mix of APN roles and inform implementation. Successful APN role introduction in Latin America and the Caribbean could provide a roadmap for similar roles in other low/middle income countries

    Nurse practitioners on 'the leading edge' of medication abortion care: A feminist qualitative approach

    Get PDF
    AIMS: To explore nurse practitioners' experiences of medication abortion implementation in Canada and to identify ways to further support the implementation of medication abortion by nurse practitioners in Canada. DESIGN: A qualitative approach informed by feminist theory and integrated knowledge translation. METHODS: Qualitative interviews with stakeholders and nurse practitioners between January 2020 and May 2021. Data were analysed using critical feminist theory. RESULTS: Participants included 20 stakeholders, 16 nurse practitioner abortion providers, and seven nurse practitioners who did not provide abortions. We found that nurse practitioners conduct educational, communication and networking activities in the implementation of medication abortion in their communities. Nurse practitioners navigated resistance to abortion care in the health system from employers, colleagues and funders. Participants valued making abortion care more accessible to their patients and indicated that normalizing medication abortion in primary care was important to them. CONCLUSION: When trained in abortion care and supported by employers, nurse practitioners are leaders of abortion care in their communities and want to provide accessible, inclusive services to their patients. We recommend nursing curricula integrate abortion services in education, and that policymakers and health administrators partner with nurses, physicians, midwives, social workers and pharmacists, for comprehensive provincial/territorial sexual and reproductive health strategies for primary care. IMPACT: The findings from this study may inform future policy, health administration and curriculum decisions related to reproductive health, and raise awareness about the crucial role of nurse practitioners in abortion care and contributions to reproductive health equity. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: This study focused on provider experiences. In-kind support was provided by Action Canada for Sexual Health & Rights, an organization that provides direct support and resources to the public and is committed to advocating on behalf of patients and the public seeking sexual and reproductive health services

    Barriers and enablers to nurse practitioner implementation of medication abortion in Canada: A qualitative study

    Get PDF
    In this study we explored nurse practitioner-provided medication abortion in Canada and identified barriers and enablers to uptake and implementation. Between 2020-2021, we conducted 43 semi-structured interviews with 20 healthcare stakeholders and 23 nurse practitioners who both provided and did not provide medication abortion. Data were analyzed using interpretive description. We identified five overarching themes: 1) Access and use of ultrasound for gestational dating; 2) Advertising and anonymity of services; 3) Abortion as specialized or primary care; 4) Location and proximity to services; and 5) Education, mentorship, and peer support. Under certain conditions, ultrasound is not required for medication abortion, supporting nurse practitioner provision in the absence of access to this technology. Nurse practitioners felt a conflict between wanting to advertise their abortion services while also protecting their anonymity and that of their patients. Some nurse practitioners perceived medication abortion to be a low-resource, easy-to-provide service, while some not providing medication abortion continued to refer patients to specialized clinics. Some participants in rural areas felt unable to provide this service because they were too far from emergency services in the event of complications. Most nurse practitioners did not have any training in abortion care during their education and desired the support of a mentor experienced in abortion provision. Addressing factors that influence nurse practitioner provision of medication abortion will help to broaden access. Nurse practitioners are well-suited to provide medication abortion care but face multiple ongoing barriers to provision. We recommend the integration of medication abortion training into nurse practitioner education. Further, widespread communication from nursing organizations could inform nurse practitioners that medication abortion is within their scope of practice and facilitate public outreach campaigns to inform the public that this service exists and can be provided by nurse practitioners

    Optimizing the Nursing Role in Abortion Care: Considerations for Health Equity.

    Get PDF
    Registered nurses (RNs) provide abortion care in hospitals and clinics and support abortion care through sexual health education and family planning care in sexual health clinics, schools and family practice. Nurse practitioners (NPs) improve access to abortion not only as prescribers of medication abortion but also as primary care providers of counselling, resources about pregnancy options and abortion follow-up care in their communities. There is a need to better understand the current status of and potential scope for optimizing nursing roles in abortion care across Canada. In this article, we describe the leadership of nurses in the provision of accessible, inclusive abortion services and discuss barriers to role optimization. We present key insights from a priority-setting meeting held in 2019 with NPs and RNs engaged in medication abortion practice in their communities. As scopes of practice continue to evolve, optimization of nursing roles in abortion care is an approach to enhancing equitable access to comprehensive abortion care and family planning
    corecore