32 research outputs found

    Universal Design for Learning in Library Instruction

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    The purpose of this poster session was to prompt discussion on how to incorporate Universal Design for Learning principles into undergraduate library instruction curricula

    For Your Enrichment: Assistance Animals in the Library: How One Academic Library Developed Best Practices

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    Effectively addressing concerns about assistance animals in any library setting is often problematic due to a lack of awareness about assistance animals in general, which then leads to uncertainty on how to proceed in these situations. Library personnel, regardless of library type, are often unaware of legal definitions of assistance animals. When compelled to respond to a patron complaint about “a dog in the library,” many library professionals are uncertain about which questions they may legally ask a patron who is accompanied by an animal. This uncertainty then creates concern about how to act in these situations, and thus, many library personnel may seek to avoid it entirely. However, with knowledge, time, some organizational development, and the appropriate legal vetting, it is possible to establish a best-practices protocol for handling complaints or concerns about patrons with an assistance animal in a library. This article details one such case study at an academic library in the Pacific Northwest

    Preferred Names & Pronouns: Best Practices for Serving Trans Individuals at Multiple Library Service Points

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    Working with transgendered or gender-queer students in a higher education environment – whether in the classroom or at a service point – can raise questions about policies, procedures, and best practices. The poster session discussed the creation of best practices and workshops for partnering with transgendered individuals on a college campus

    Serving Students with Disabilities: How Campus Partnerships Can Enhance College Education

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    Working with students with disabilities in a higher education environment – whether in the classroom or at a service point – can raise questions about policies, procedures, and best practices. The poster session discussed the creation of a tutorial for university faculty in attempt to perform outreach and raise awareness

    Women of Color in Speculative Fiction: An Annotated Bibliography of Authors

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    Women of Color in Speculative Fiction: An Annotated Bibliography is tertiary electronic resource which focuses upon authors who are women of color (i.e., non-Caucasian) and who write speculative fiction for adult and young adult audiences. Examples of these authors include Octavia Butler, N. K. Jemisin, Daina Chaviano, Jewelle Gomez, and Malinda Lo. For some background, “speculative fiction” is an umbrella term for science fiction, fantasy, and some horror, all of which have literary and popular merit (Urbanski 2007). Historically, this field has been dominated by male authors of largely Caucasian descent; women and/or people of color have not been equitably represented in this genre. Completed in October 2016, the purpose of this annotated bibliography is to raise awareness about underrepresented authors who bring unique perspectives to this genre. Here are the components of the project: - Introduction: This document, which contains an overview of the rationale and implementation of the project, also includes a brief discussion of emerging patterns. - Project Parameters: This document outlines the scope (and subsequent limitations) of this project. - Annotated Bibliography: The annotated bibliography, which lists fifty-five authors and a summary of their novels and novellas. - Addendum: Speculative Fiction Awards in North America: This collection of awards given to speculative fiction authors in North America may be a useful resource for LIS professionals (for library programming or exhibit creation) and / or other researchers. Funding: Women of Color in Speculative Fiction was funded by the American Library Association Carnegie-Whitney Grants program. Learn more about the program here. Acknowledgements: I must acknowledge, and extend deep gratitude to, two individuals who contributed to the success of this project: Desiree Campos, a student colleague who patiently gathered authors and affiliated works over the course of several months. Desiree, thank you for your persistence and commitment to this project. Rachel B. Rozdzial, MLISc., a colleague who provided editorial and authoring support for the annotations. Rachel, thank you for your keen eye and supportive feedback! Feedback Form: Have feedback? Please share your thoughts with the author. Accessibility: Contact the author if you need any of these documents in an alternative electronic format.https://cedar.wwu.edu/cedarbooks/1007/thumbnail.jp

    Chapter 04 - OneSearch

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    Learn how to search, retrieve results, and navigate throughout the user interface of Western Washington University Libraries’ shared catalog.https://cedar.wwu.edu/research_process/1008/thumbnail.jp

    The Textbook Publication Process: Strategies for Creating Open Education Resources

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    Join the editors of the new textbook The Research Process: Strategies for Undergraduate Students as they discuss the process of creating this Open Education Resource. An edited anthology, this textbook was collaboratively written by specialists across the library, utilizing a wide range of expertise to cover a variety of topics to support undergraduate student research. The editors, Rebecca M. Marrall and Jenny Oleen, will discuss the philosophy behind publishing the textbook as an open education resource, the process of creating and editing the text, working with authors, and implementation of open access publication. Geared towards faculty and instructors who may be interested in creating or collaborating on their own open access textbook, an electronic toolkit of resources, including templates, is provided in additional files below. This open education resource is published through Western Washington University’s Institutional Repository, Western CEDAR, a service available for all faculty authors associated with Western

    Practicing What We Preach: Showcasing OER through the Creation of a Research Strategies Textbook

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    Learn how an academic library at a Master\u27s granting university published an open access textbook, intended for undergraduate students and authored by librarians and library professionals. This textbook was an edited anthology intended to supplement a library-based credit course in research strategies and academic success. This poster session will provide an overview of the process and the final product, alongside an electronic toolkit of resources for attendees. Additional materials are available here

    Chapter 06 - Web Literacy

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    Identify the concepts of web literacy; learn about Google and Wikipedia as research tools; and explore the Digital Divide phenomenon.https://cedar.wwu.edu/research_process/1011/thumbnail.jp

    Sequential Art & Academic Library Instruction: Crafting a Toolbox of Multiple Literacies for Credit Courses

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    Sequential art is a unique storytelling medium that combines visuals and content in a deliberate, specific delivery in order to engage audiences on emotional and cognitive levels. Consequently, graphic novels, comics, and comix are a rich educational medium for undergraduate credit instruction in academic libraries, precisely because this alternative delivery of content can effectively educate many learning styles. This article documents the development and implementation of an undergraduate, upper-division credit-bearing course in an academic library that examined multiple types of literacy through the medium, with commentary on instructional strategies for other academic librarians and professors
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