4 research outputs found

    Genetic and Technological Characterisation of Vineyard-and Winery-Associated Lactic Acid Bacteria

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    Vineyard-and winery-associated lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from two major PDO regions in Greece, Peza and Nemea, were surveyed. LAB were isolated from grapes, fermenting musts, and winery tanks performing spontaneous malolactic fermentations (MLF). Higher population density and species richness were detected in Nemea than in Peza vineyards and on grapes than in fermenting musts. Pediococcus pentosaceus and Lactobacillus graminis were the most abundant LAB on grapes, while Lactobacillus plantarum dominated in fermenting musts from both regions. No particular structure of Lactobacillus plantarum populations according to the region of origin was observed, and strain distribution seems random. LAB species diversity in winery tanks differed significantly from that in vineyard samples, consisting principally of Oenococcus oeni. Different strains were analysed as per their enological characteristics and the ability to produce biogenic amines (BAs). Winery-associated species showed higher resistance to low pH, ethanol, SO 2 , and CuSO 4 than vineyard-associated isolates. The frequency of BA-producing strains was relatively low but not negligible, considering that certain winery-associated Lactobacillus hilgardii strains were able to produce BAs. Present results show the necessity of controlling the MLF by selected starters in order to avoid BA accumulation in wine

    Molecular Characterization and Enological Potential of A High Lactic Acid-Producing Lachancea thermotolerans Vineyard Strain

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    Lactic acid production is an important feature of the yeast Lachancea thermotolerans that has gained increasing interest in winemaking. In particular, in light of climate change, the biological acidification and ethanol reduction by the use of selected yeast strains may counteract the effect of global warming in wines. Here, the enological potential of a high lactate-producing L. thermotolerans strain (P-HO1) in mixed fermentations with S. cerevisiae was examined. Among the different inoculation schemes evaluated, the most successful implantation of L. thermotolerans was accomplished by sequential inoculation of S. cerevisiae, i.e., at 1% vol. ethanol. P-HO1produced the highest levels of lactic acid ever recorded in mixed fermentations (10.4 g/L), increasing thereby the acidity and reducing ethanol by 1.6% vol. L. thermotolerans was also associated with increases in ethyl isobutyrate (strawberry aroma), free SO2, organoleptically perceived citric nuances and aftertaste. To start uncovering the molecular mechanisms of lactate biosynthesis in L. thermotolerans, the relative expressions of the three lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) paralogous genes, which encode the key enzyme for lactate biosynthesis, along with the alcohol dehydrogenase paralogs (ADHs) were determined. Present results point to the possible implication of LDH2, but not of other LDH or ADH genes, in the high production of lactic acid in certain strains at the expense of ethanol. Taken together, the important enological features of P-HO1 highlighted here, and potentially of other L. thermotolerans strains, indicate its great importance in modern winemaking, particularly in the light of the upcoming climate change and its consequences in the grape/wine system

    Genetic and Technological Characterisation of Vineyard- and Winery-Associated Lactic Acid Bacteria

    No full text
    Vineyard- and winery-associated lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from two major PDO regions in Greece, Peza and Nemea, were surveyed. LAB were isolated from grapes, fermenting musts, and winery tanks performing spontaneous malolactic fermentations (MLF). Higher population density and species richness were detected in Nemea than in Peza vineyards and on grapes than in fermenting musts. Pediococcus pentosaceus and Lactobacillus graminis were the most abundant LAB on grapes, while Lactobacillus plantarum dominated in fermenting musts from both regions. No particular structure of Lactobacillus plantarum populations according to the region of origin was observed, and strain distribution seems random. LAB species diversity in winery tanks differed significantly from that in vineyard samples, consisting principally of Oenococcus oeni. Different strains were analysed as per their enological characteristics and the ability to produce biogenic amines (BAs). Winery-associated species showed higher resistance to low pH, ethanol, SO2, and CuSO4 than vineyard-associated isolates. The frequency of BA-producing strains was relatively low but not negligible, considering that certain winery-associated Lactobacillus hilgardii strains were able to produce BAs. Present results show the necessity of controlling the MLF by selected starters in order to avoid BA accumulation in wine
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