62 research outputs found

    16S_BZ_Felids

    No full text
    Alignment of 16S (L2513, H2714, Kitano et al. 2007) sequence data in nexus format. Sample ID is tied to selected specimen (fecal DNA samples) of three Neotropical felids (jaguar, Panthera onca; puma, Puma concolor; ocelot, Leopardus pardalis) collected in Belize, Central America

    ATP6_BZ_Felids

    No full text
    Alignment of adenosine triphosphate-6 (ATP6-DF3, ATP6-DR2, Chaves et al. 2012) sequence data in nexus format. Sample ID is tied to selected specimen (fecal DNA samples) of three Neotropical felids (jaguar, Panthera onca; puma, Puma concolor; ocelot, Leopardus pardalis) collected in Belize, Central America

    Sampling summary.

    No full text
    <p>Sampling summary.</p

    STRUCTURE - Belize Felids - Wultsch et al. 2014

    No full text
    STRUCTURE file for the manuscript "Noninvasive Individual and Species Identification of Jaguars (Panthera onca), Pumas (Puma concolor) and Ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) in Belize, Central America using Cross-Species Microsatellites and Fecal DNA". The file includes microsatellite genotype data for the three target species detected in Belize for this study

    Genetic structure of <i>Leopardus pardalis</i> in Belize.

    No full text
    <p>Inference for number of genetic clusters (<i>K</i>) was based on mean log likelihood LnP(D), using the admixture model with correlated allele frequencies without (a) and (b) with prior sampling location information obtained in STRUCTURE, version 2.3.3 [<a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0151043#pone.0151043.ref048" target="_blank">48</a>], and (c) spatially-explicit Bayesian clustering assignment in GENELAND, version 4.0.3. [<a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0151043#pone.0151043.ref052" target="_blank">52</a>]. Within the barplots each bar represents one individual felid and the color of the bar represents the % of membership (<i>Q</i>) the individual belongs to different genetic clusters.</p

    16Scp_BZ_Felids

    No full text
    Alignment of 16Scp (16Scp-F, 16Scp-F, Kitano et al. 2007) sequence data in nexus format. Sample ID is tied to selected specimen (fecal DNA samples) of three Neotropical felids (jaguar, Panthera onca; puma, Puma concolor; ocelot, Leopardus pardalis) collected in Belize, Central America

    A Comparative Analysis of Genetic Diversity and Structure in Jaguars (<i>Panthera onca</i>), Pumas (<i>Puma concolor</i>), and Ocelots (<i>Leopardus pardalis</i>) in Fragmented Landscapes of a Critical Mesoamerican Linkage Zone

    No full text
    <div><p>With increasing anthropogenic impact and landscape change, terrestrial carnivore populations are becoming more fragmented. Thus, it is crucial to genetically monitor wild carnivores and quantify changes in genetic diversity and gene flow in response to these threats. This study combined the use of scat detector dogs and molecular scatology to conduct the first genetic study on wild populations of multiple Neotropical felids coexisting across a fragmented landscape in Belize, Central America. We analyzed data from 14 polymorphic microsatellite loci in 1053 scat samples collected from wild jaguars (<i>Panthera onca</i>), pumas (<i>Puma concolor</i>), and ocelots (<i>Leopardus pardalis</i>). We assessed levels of genetic diversity, defined potential genetic clusters, and examined gene flow for the three target species on a countrywide scale using a combination of individual- and population-based analyses. Wild felids in Belize showed moderate levels of genetic variation, with jaguars having the lowest diversity estimates (<i>H</i><sub><i>E</i></sub> = 0.57 ± 0.02; <i>A</i><sub><i>R</i></sub> = 3.36 ± 0.09), followed by pumas (<i>H</i><sub><i>E</i></sub> = 0.57 ± 0.08; <i>A</i><sub><i>R</i></sub> = 4.20 ± 0.16), and ocelots (<i>H</i><sub><i>E</i></sub> = 0.63 ± 0.03; <i>A</i><sub><i>R</i></sub> = 4.16 ± 0.08). We observed low to moderate levels of genetic differentiation for all three target species, with jaguars showing the lowest degree of genetic subdivision across the country, followed by ocelots and pumas. Although levels of genetic diversity and gene flow were still fairly high, we detected evidence of fine-scale genetic subdivision, indicating that levels of genetic connectivity for wild felids in Belize are likely to decrease if habitat loss and fragmentation continue at the current rate. Our study demonstrates the value of understanding fine-scale patterns of gene flow in multiple co-occurring felid species of conservation concern, which is vital for wildlife movement corridor planning and prioritizing future conservation and management efforts within human-impacted landscapes.</p></div

    Summary statistics of genetic diversity for <i>Panthera onca</i>, <i>Puma concolor</i>, <i>and Leopardus pardalis</i> in Belize.

    No full text
    <p>Summary statistics of genetic diversity for <i>Panthera onca</i>, <i>Puma concolor</i>, <i>and Leopardus pardalis</i> in Belize.</p

    Discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC) of Neotropical felids in Belize.

    No full text
    <p>Analysis was implemented with (a) <i>Panthera onca</i> and (b) <i>Puma concolor</i> genotypes detected across five geographical regions (north, north-central, central, south-central, south) within Belize using <i>adegenet</i>, version 1.4.2 [<a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0151043#pone.0151043.ref047" target="_blank">47</a>] in software R, version 3.1.3 [<a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0151043#pone.0151043.ref039" target="_blank">39</a>]. Scatterplots show the first two principal components. Points represent individual genotypes, and geographical groups of jaguars and pumas are represented through 95% inertia ellipses in different colors. The barplot (bottom-right) graphs eigenvalues of the first four principal components in relative magnitude.</p

    Study area map of short- and long-term survey sites for Neotropical felids across various geographical regions in Belize.

    No full text
    <p>Geographical regions covered include (1) the north (FB, Fireburn/Balam Na Nature Reserve; SNP, Shipstern Nature Reserve), (2) north-central (RBCMA, Rio Bravo Conservation and Management Area; BF, Big Falls; MFR, Manatee Forest Reserve; TSB, Tiger Sandy Bay), (3) central (MPR, Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve; CFRNP, Chiquibul Forest Reserve and National Park; BFR, Bull Run Farm; HVPR, Hidden Valley Private Reserve), (4) south-central (CBWS, Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary), and (5) south (BNR, Bladen Nature Reserve; BC, Boden Creek Ecological Preserve; GS, Golden Stream Corridor Preserve; MH, Machaca Hills; STNP, Sarstoon-Temash National Park).</p
    corecore