119 research outputs found

    Investment decision and the spatial dimension : Evidence from firm level data

    Get PDF
    This paper proposes to investigate the effect of spillovers on location decision of firms. We develop an analysis merging the geographer toolbox with the standard econometric techniques. For a chosen sample of sectors, through the spatial data analysis, we test the existence of positive spatial autocorrelation for R&D investments that lead R&D expenditure to cluster. Moreover, we succeed in detecting how far the local environment may influence the firm decisions in R&D investments. Data confirm tha tthe proximity to other firms investing in R&D may produce positive externalities. Finally, the diversity vs. specialization debate is tackled.Local clustering;R@D investment;spatial autocorrelation

    Coagglomeration and Spillovers

    Get PDF
    We study the coagglomeration of domestic plants and foreign multinationals and the impact of this on domestic plant productivity and employment using data for Irish manufacturing. Relying on a recently developed index we find that coagglomeration has been important for a number of industries. Our econometric analysis reveals that local foreign presence has indeed resulted in productivity spillovers to domestic plants, although only in those industries where there has been coagglomeration. Further evidence suggests that these spillovers have also resulted in more jobs.Coagglomeration, FDI, spillovers, Ireland

    Polluting technologies and sustainable economic development

    Get PDF
    We study how the import of older and more polluting technologies alters the relationship between output and environmental quality in developing countries within a vintage capital framework. Our results show that old technologies prolong the period until which pollution may eventually decrease and cause this turning point to be reached at a higher level of pollution. An empirical analysis using export data of vintage technologies from the US and Europe to developing countries supports our theoretical findings.environmental quality, sustainable development, vintage technologies

    Climatic Change and Rural-Urban Migration: The Case of Sub-Saharan Africa

    Get PDF
    We investigate the role that climatic change has played in the pattern of urbanization in sub-Saharan countries compared to the rest of the developing world. To this end we assemble a cross-country panel data set that allows us to estimate the determinants of urbanization. The results of our econometric analysis suggest that climatic change, as proxied by rainfall, has acted to change urbanization in sub-Saharan Africa but not elsewhere in the developing world. Moreover, this link has become stronger since decolonization, which is likely due to the often simultaneous lifting of legislation prohibiting the free internal movement of native Africans.urbanization, climate change, rainfall, rural-urban migration, Africa

    Dry Times in Africa: Rainfall and Africa's Growth Performance

    Get PDF
    While there have been some references in the literature to the potential role of the general decline in rainfall in sub-Saharan African nations on their poor growth performance relative to other developing countries, this avenue remains empirically unexplored. In this paper we use a new cross-country panel climate data set in an economic growth framework to explore the issue. Our results show that rainfall has been a significant determinants of poor economic growth for Africa but not for other developing countries. Depending on the benchmark measure of potential rainfall, we estimate that the direct impact under the scenario of no decline in rainfall would have resulted in a reduction of between 13 and 36 per cent of today's gap in African GDP per capita relative to the rest of the developing world.Development, Africa, Climate

    Trends in Rainfall and Economic Growth in Africa: A Neglected Cause of the Growth Tragedy

    Get PDF
    We examine the role of trends in rainfall in the poor growth performance of sub-Saharan African nations relative to other developing countries. To do so we use a new crosscountry panel climatic data set in an empirical economic growth framework. Our results show that rainfall has been a significant determinant of poor economic growth for Africa, but not for other developing countries. Depending on the benchmark measure of potential rainfall, we estimate that the direct impact under the scenario of no decline in rainfall would have resulted in a reduction of between around 15 and 40 per cent of todays gap in African GDP per capita relative to the rest of the developing world. --

    Deregulation shock in product market and unemployment

    Get PDF
    In a dynamic general equilibrium model with endogenous markups and labor market frictions, we investigate the effects of increased product market competition. Unlike most macroeconomic models of search, we endogenize the labor supply along the extensive margin. We show that beneficial effects in labor market outcomes require that the condition for saddle-path stability must be fulfilled whereas instability yields detrimental effects. Additionally, we find numerically that most of the decline in the unemployment rate can be attributed to the increase in the labor force, while the number of job seekers remains fairly unchanged. For a calibration capturing alternatively European and the U.S. labor markets, a deregulation episode, which lowers the markup by 3 percentage points, results in a fall in the unemployment rate by 0.1 and 0.05 percentage point, respectively, while the labor share is almost unaffected in the long-run

    Polluting technologies and sustainable economic development

    Get PDF
    Bertinelli L, Strobl E, Zou B. Polluting technologies and sustainable economic development. Working Papers. Institute of Mathematical Economics. Vol 379. Bielefeld: UniversitÀt Bielefeld; 2006.We study how the import of older and more polluting technologies alters the relationship between output and environmental quality in developing countries within a vintage capital framework. Our results show that old technologies prolong the period until which pollution may eventually decrease and cause this turning point to be reached at a higher level of pollution. An empirical analysis using export data of vintage technologies from the US and Europe to developing countries supports our theoretical findings

    Technical Change Biased Toward the Traded Sector and Labor Market Frictions

    Get PDF
    This paper investigates the relative wage and the relative price effects of higher productivity growth in tradables relative to non tradables in a two-sector open economy model with search unemployment. Applying cointegration methods to a panel of eighteen OECD countries over the period 1970-2007, our estimates reveal that a 1 percentage point increase in the productivity differential between tradables and non tradables lowers the non traded wage relative to the traded wage (relative wage) by 0.22% and appreciates the relative price of non tradables by 0.64%. While the decline in the relative wage reveals the presence of mobility costs preventing from the wage equalization across sectors, the relative wage responses to a productivity differentialdisplay a large dispersion across countries, thus suggesting that labor market frictions vary substantially across OECD economies. Using a set of indicators capturing the heterogeneity of labor market frictions across economies, we find that the relative wage significantly declines more in countries where labor market regulation is more pronounced. These empirical findings can be rationalized in a two-sector open economy model with search in the labor market and an endogenous labor force participation. In line with our estimates, our quantitative analysis reveals that the relative wage falls more in countries where unemployment benefits are more generous, firing cost is high, the worker bargaining power is large, and/or the labor force is less responsive at the extensive margin. When calibrating the model to each OECD economy, our numerical results reveal that the model predicts the relative wage response fairly well, and to a lesser extent the relative price response
    • 

    corecore