50 research outputs found

    The wage-local unemployment relationship in a highly regulated labour market : Greece

    Get PDF
    The wage-local unemployment relationship in a highly regulated labour market: Greece, Regional Studies. Using data obtained from 80 000 employees, this paper examines the relationship between individual wages and regional unemployment in Greece. The findings highlight the dynamics of the local labour markets in a case such as Greece, where the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) claims that wage flexibility is limited. This study does not find evidence that wages in Greece are rigid, but finds a wage curve elasticity of close to - 0.1, which corresponds to evidence from many counties. Interestingly, graduates are found to be the most responsive group of workers to the behaviour of local labour markets

    The incidence of long-term unemployment : evidence from Greece

    Get PDF
    In this article, I use the 2000-2004 data from the Greek Labour Force Survey in order to estimate a logit model for the incidence of long-term unemployment. The model computed is similar to the one estimated by Obben et al. (2002). It is found that attributes of the individual such as gender, age category, marital status and region of residence affect the odds of being long-term unemployed. On the other hand, the level of someone's qualification does not affect the odds of whether someone will be short or long-term unemployed

    The Effect of Higher Education on Gender Wage-Gap

    Get PDF
    In this paper we investigate the effect of an academic degree on gender wage gap in Greece and the United Kingdom. Using Labour Force Survey (LFS) micro-data, first, we compare the returns to higher education for males and females, second, we decompose the gender wage gap between graduates and individuals with secondary education, and finally we analyse the effect of higher education on the (un)explained part of the wage gap. For that purpose, an extension of the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition technique is used. We find that the unexplained part, which is often related to discrimination is lower for graduates in both countries.Discrimination, graduates, gender

    Educational segregation and the gender wage gap in Greece

    Get PDF
    Purpose To investigate the extent to which differences in the subject of degree studied by male and female university graduates contributes to the gender pay gap in Greece, an EU country with historically large gender discrepancies in earnings and occupational segregation. In addition, to explore the reasons underlying the distinct educational choices of men and women, with particular emphasis on the role of wage uncertainty. Design/methodology/approach Using micro-data from the Greek Labour Force Survey (LFS), Oaxaca-Blinder decompositions are employed to detect the extent to which gender differences in the type of degree studied can explain the male-female pay gap. ‘Risk-augmented earnings functions’ are also used to examine the differential wage premiums offered to men and women in Greece in response to the uncertainty associated with different fields of study. Findings It is found that the subjects in which women are relatively over-represented (e.g. Education, Humanities) are also those with the lowest wage returns. Gender differences in the type of degree studied can therefore explain an additional 8.4% of the male-female pay gap in Greece. A potential reason for distinct gender educational choices is that women opt for less uncertain educations that consequently command lower wage premiums in the job market. Practical Implications The findings suggest that the promotion of gender equality in Greece should pay closer attention to removing informal barriers to entry for women in educational fields traditionally chosen by men (e.g. more effective careers advice, work-experience placements, matching of young girls with professional ‘mentors’). Originality/value The study is the first to investigate the contribution of individual’s field of study to the gender wage gap in Greece. In addition, it includes the first-ever estimations of ‘risk-augmented earnings equations’ for that country

    Sickness Absence: a Pan-European Study

    Get PDF
    This study, using the EU-LFS, examines the determinants of sickness absence in 26 EU countries. The analysis highlights the importance of demographic and workplace characteristics and of institutional and societal conditions. Female workers aged 26-35 exhibit higher absenteeism, possibly reflecting the level of high household labour pressure. Increased job insecurity, captured by temporary contracts, and labour market uncertainty, reflected in higher unemployment rates, have a negative effect on absenteeism. Finally, individual sickness absence is lower in countries with higher proportion of dependent/out of the labour market individuals, probably because of the increasing pressure labour active people may experience.Absenteeism, sickness, EU, Labour Force Survey

    The Gender Wage Gap as a Function of Educational Degree Choices in an Occupationally Segregated EU Country

    Get PDF
    This study investigates the extent to which differences in the subject of degree studied by male and female university graduates contributes to the gender pay gap, and the reasons underlying their distinct educational choices. The case of Greece is examined due to the fact that it is an EU country with historically large gender discrepancies in earnings and occupational segregation. Using micro-data from the Greek Labour Force Survey (LFS), the returns to academic disciplines are firstly estimated by gender. It is found that the subjects in which women are relatively over-represented (e.g. Education, Humanities) are also those with the lowest wage returns. Oaxaca-Blinder decompositions subsequently imply that gender differences in the type of degree studied can explain an additional 8.4% of the male-female pay gap. Risk-augmented earnings functions of the Hartog-type also indicate that women seek for less risky educations that consequently command lower wage premiums in the job market.gender wage gap, subject of degree, returns, risk, Greece

    Wage Returns to University Disciplines in Greece: Are Greek Higher Education Degrees Trojan Horses?

    Get PDF
    This paper examines the wage returns to qualifications and academic disciplines in the Greek labour market. Exploring wage responsiveness across various degree subjects in Greece is interesting, as it is characterised by high levels of graduate unemployment, which vary considerably by field of study, and relatively low levels of wage flexibility. Using micro-data from recently available waves (2002-2003) of the Greek Labour Force Survey (LFS), the returns to academic disciplines are estimated by gender and public/private sector. Quantile regressions and cohort interactions are also used to capture the heterogeneity in wage returns across the various disciplines. The results show considerable variation in wage premiums across the fields of study, with lower returns for those that have a marginal role to play in an economy with a rising services/shrinking public sector. Educational reforms that pay closer attention to the future prospects of university disciplines are advocated.academic disciplines, wage returns, higher education, Greece

    The Relationship Between Higher Education and Labour Market in Greece: the Weakest Link?

    Get PDF
    The high level of graduate unemployment, even though has been acknowledged as one of the most distinctive characteristics of the Greek labour market, has not attracted enough attention in the academic literature. This paper utilizes the recently available micro-data from the Greek Labour Force Survey in order to investigate how the employment situation of young (aged 35 and below) graduates varies according to their field of study. The findings suggest that graduates of disciplines that have high levels of private sector employment, such as Polytechnics and Computer Science, are in general better off in the Greek labour market. On the other hand, graduates of disciplines that are traditionally related to the needs of the public sector, such as Sociology and Humanities face poor employment prospects. The findings of this study highlight the need for drastic reforms of the Higher Education system.graduate unemployment, Greece, higher education, field of study, labour market

    Gender employment discrimination : Greece and the United Kingdom

    Get PDF
    Purpose: This study examines the factors affecting the labour market status of females in Greece and the UK respectively, and also attempts to explore what accounts for the differences in the employment status between males and females. In particular, the study assesses whether these differences can be explained by employees’ endowments or by discrimination in the labour market. Methodology-Approach: Labour Force Survey (LFS) data are used to examine the impact of observable characteristics on female labour market participation,unemployment and self-employment through the use of logit models. An extension of the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition technique is used to estimate the gender employment discrimination gap. Findings: Clear evidence of gender differences was found in both countries, although differences are substantially larger in the case of Greece. Evidence of female employment discrimination was also found in both labour markets. Originality/Value: The paper explores the factors affecting the labour market situation of females, and for the first time, assesses the level of gender employment discrimination in Greece and the UK analysing the differences on the unemployment rates of males and females

    What determines self-employment? : a comparative study

    Get PDF
    This article consists of a comparative study of the incidence of self-employment (SE) between Greece, which has the highest rate of SE in the European Union and the United Kingdom, which has amongst the lowest. Data from the Greek and the UK Labour Force Surveys are used in order to assess how personal attributes of an individual have an impact on the incidence of SE. It is found that common patterns exist between these two countries. In particular, it is found that for both countries, males have greater odds of being self-employed than females, older people have greater odds than younger, individuals employed in the primary and tertiary sectors have greater odds than the ones employed in the secondary, and that individuals with primary or secondary education have greater odds of being self-employed than individuals holding higher degrees. The incidence of SE is also found to differ according to the occupation of the individual. On the other hand, the findings indicate that individuals, residing in London, have greater odds of being self-employed than individuals working outside UK's capital, whereas in Greece the pattern is reversed
    corecore