10 research outputs found

    Basic and Advanced Competence in Collaborating With Clergy

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    Some of the stories of psychologists and clergy working together have happy endings, and some do not. Twenty psychologists and clergy who work together well were interviewed, and 94 clergy (53% response rate) and 145 psychologists (76% response rate) were surveyed. A 2-tiered schema for working well with clergy is proposed. Basic collaborative qualifications, such as respect for clergy and communication with clergy as needed, should be considered minimal competence for all professional psychologists. Additional qualifications, such as awareness of religious spirituality and shared values, are necessary for more advanced forms of collaboration

    Clergy Interest in Innovative Collaboration with Psychologists

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    What forms of innovative collaboration are possible between clergy and psychologists? A total of 117 clergypersons (63% response rate) rated 6 scenarios of collaboration, indicating their level of interest and the extent to which they would like to remain involved with the psychologist. The scenarios were derived from two categories of collaboration articulated by in previous research: mental health services and enhancing parish life. Overall, clergy expressed relatively modest levels of interest in innovative collaboration, though they were somewhat interested in mental health consultation services. Many clergy refer troubled parishioners to clinical or counseling psychologists for treatment, but appear less interested in more innovative forms of collaboration

    Care For Pastors: Learning From Clergy and Their Spouses

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    Pastors and their spouses face unique challenges because of the nature of pastoral work, and yet most manage these challenges successfully. Five studies are presented which help distinguish between intrapersonal, family, and community forms of care. Pastors rely heavily on intrapersonal forms of coping such as spiritual devotion, hobbies, exercise, and taking time away from work. The marriage relationship is also quite important for most clergy and spouses. Relationships outside the immediate family are not commonly identified as coping resources. Implications are discussed

    Treatment consideration and manifest complexity in comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders

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    Psychiatric disorders may co-occur in the same individual. These include, for example, substance abuse or obsessive-compulsive disorder with schizophrenia, and movement disorders or epilepsy with affective dysfunctional states. Medications may produce iatrogenic effects, for example cognitive impairments that co-occur with the residual symptoms of the primary disorder being treated. The observation of comorbid disorders in some cases may reflect diagnostic overlap. Impulsivity, impulsiveness or impulsive behaviour is implicated in a range of diagnostic conditions including substance abuse, affective disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. These observations suggest a need to re-evaluate established diagnostic criteria and disorder definitions, focusing instead on symptoms and symptom-profiles

    Cardiovascular Activity

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