74 research outputs found

    Chordal Graphs are Fully Orientable

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    Suppose that D is an acyclic orientation of a graph G. An arc of D is called dependent if its reversal creates a directed cycle. Let m and M denote the minimum and the maximum of the number of dependent arcs over all acyclic orientations of G. We call G fully orientable if G has an acyclic orientation with exactly d dependent arcs for every d satisfying m <= d <= M. A graph G is called chordal if every cycle in G of length at least four has a chord. We show that all chordal graphs are fully orientable.Comment: 11 pages, 1 figure, accepted by Ars Combinatoria (March 26, 2010

    A Note on Near-factor-critical Graphs

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    A near-factor of a finite simple graph GG is a matching that saturates all vertices except one. A graph GG is said to be near-factor-critical if the deletion of any vertex from GG results in a subgraph that has a near-factor. We prove that a connected graph GG is near-factor-critical if and only if it has a perfect matching. We also characterize disconnected near-factor-critical graphs.Comment: 4 page

    Full Orientability of the Square of a Cycle

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    Let D be an acyclic orientation of a simple graph G. An arc of D is called dependent if its reversal creates a directed cycle. Let d(D) denote the number of dependent arcs in D. Define m and M to be the minimum and the maximum number of d(D) over all acyclic orientations D of G. We call G fully orientable if G has an acyclic orientation with exactly k dependent arcs for every k satisfying m <= k <= M. In this paper, we prove that the square of a cycle C_n of length n is fully orientable except n=6.Comment: 7 pages, accepted by Ars Combinatoria on May 26, 201
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