9 research outputs found

    Profiling teachers based on their professional attitudes towards teaching responsible research and innovation

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    In order to facilitate policy‐driven reforms in science education, it is important to understand how teaching innovations diffuse among teachers and how that adoption process can be catalysed. Little is known about the set of attitudes that makes teachers early or late adopters. In this study, the Concerns‐Based Adoption Model (C‐BAM) was employed as a framework for analysing teachers’ interests, concerns, worries and enthusiasm. We argue that the questionnaire typically used with C‐BAM suffers from a ceiling effect and has unbalanced variables. An improved version of the questionnaire was developed and implemented in the project IRRESISTIBLE with 180 science teachers in ten countries at all school levels. The case of educational innovation in this project was Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI), a concept offered by the EU for science education to orient towards socially and ethically sensitive and inclusive processes of science and technology. Using cluster analysis we found four concern profile types: the Carefree, the Pragmatic, the Uncertain and the Worried. With their relatively high positive interests, the Carefree and the Pragmatic profile types are most likely to be early adopters. The high number of Uncertain teachers calls for better conceptualization of RRI in the school context. Furthermore, teacher professional development and additional resources are needed if this innovation is to be diffused widely across European schools. The improved questionnaire provided elaborate information on teachers’ concerns and interests, and could help in understanding and facilitating other top‐down educational reforms as well.Peer reviewe

    SisÀltötiedosta luonnontieteelliseen lukutaitoon - tiedeopetuksen muuttuvat tavoitteet

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    Luonnontieteiden kouluopetuksen tavoitteita on jo pitkÀÀn laajennettu tieteellisen sisÀltötiedon ulkopuolelle. Perinteisen sisÀltötietopainotuksen sijaan on alettu korostaa luonnontieteellistÀ lukutaitoa (engl. scientific literacy), jonka tavoitteena on antaa oppilaille valmiuksia osallistua tieteeseen ja teknologiaan liittyvÀÀn keskusteluun ja pÀÀtöksentekoon henkilökohtaisissa, yhteiskunnallisissa ja globaaleissa kysymyksissÀ. Suomen tuoreen opetussuunnitelmauudistuksen painotukset ja ilmiöpohjaisuus ovat osa tÀtÀ maailmanlaajuista kehitystÀ. TÀssÀ artikkelissa esitÀmme, ettÀ luonnontieteellisen lukutaidon opettamiseen ja ilmiöoppimiseen liittyy ratkaisemattomia jÀnnitteitÀ. Vaikka nykyisissÀ tavoitteissa korostuu opetuksen relevanssi oppijan ja yhteiskunnan kannalta, sisÀltötieto mÀÀritellÀÀn edelleen pitkÀlti oppiainelÀhtöisen autenttisuuden nÀkökulmasta. Me argumentoimme, ettÀ opetusmenetelmien ja kontekstien lisÀksi myös sisÀltötieto on uudelleenmÀÀriteltÀvÀ muuttuneiden tavoitteiden mukaiseksi.Peer reviewe

    Exploring teachers' concerns about bringing Responsible Research and Innovation to European science classrooms

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    The European Union pushes science education to orient toward the concept of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI; i.e., socially and ethically sensitive and inclusive processes of science and technology). Schools should further understanding on how science interacts with society and increase students’ engagement in science. This exploratory study analysed concerns of 67 active, forward-looking teachers from 10 European countries using a questionnaire based on the concerns-based adoption model (C-BAM) and open-ended questions regarding the adoption of RRI into teaching. In the context of an international professional development programme on RRI, a pre/post comparison was also carried out for 29 of the teachers. The results showed that the forerunner teachers were willing to find information and collaborate on RRI teaching and believed that RRI can engage students and be a worthwhile part of the curriculum. Yet the respondents voiced personal concerns about their ability to teach RRI, and only a few concerns were resolved during the professional development period. Teachers need extended support and networking to contextualise RRI into their science lessons. On the basis of the results, we discuss the possibilities of teaching RRI implicitly rather than explicitly in order to foster students’ own reasoning about RRI-related values. Our results also demonstrate that the customary questionnaire used with C-BAM gives a consistent picture of teachers’ concerns but does not differentiate teachers enough in order to formulate a statistically sound clustering of concern profiles. We argue that with proper adjustments the questionnaire can provide more diverse and informative profiling of teachers’ concerns.Peer reviewe

    Project Evaluation

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    IRRESISTIBLE Public Deliverable D5.

    The challenge of working with the future within STEM education

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    Global crises and societal uncertainty mean that youth perceive the future no longer as a promise but as a threat, and have difficulty projecting themselves into the future. Future studies and action competence pedagogies partly inform our EU-funded strategic partnership to develop teaching strategies and materials that build future-scaffolding skills. The first teaching module on climate was implemented in June 2017 in Italy, with 24 Finnish, Icelandic and Italian upper secondary school students and their teachers. Qualitative data were analysed to shed light on how the module impacted on students' attitudes toward present and future.Peer reviewe

    Contextualizing the EU's “Responsible Research and Innovation”policy in science education : a conceptual comparison with the Nature of Science concept and practical examples

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    The European Union (EU) encourages science education to be oriented towards the concept of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI), i.e. socially and ethically sensitive and inclusive processes of science and technology. Connecting RRI to prevailing concepts in science education, such as the Nature of Science (NoS), may facilitate the incorporation of RRI in curricula and classrooms. We carried out a conceptual comparison between the EU’s RRI policy and a recent reconceptualization of NoS, known as the expanded Family Resemblance Approach. We discuss how the socio-institutional nature of science in that approach closely connects to the RRI and can provide a means for RRI teaching. To illustrate these opportunities, we present practical classroom approaches developed in the EU-funded project IRRESISTIBLE, and survey results on teachers’ perspectives on RRI. The aim of this work is to understand better the potential implications of RRI to research and practice in science education.Peer reviewe

    Factors Influencing Postsecondary STEM Students’ Views of the Public Communication of an Emergent Technology : a Cross-National Study from Five Universities

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    Recent efforts in the science education community have highlighted the need to integrate research and theory from science communication research into more general science education scholarship. These synthesized research perspectives are relatively novel but serve an important need to better understand the impacts that the advent of rapidly emerging technologies will have on a new generation of scientists and engineers including their formal communication with engaged citizenry. This cross-national study examined postsecondary science and engineering students’ (n = 254 from five countries: Austria, Finland, France, Israel, and USA) perspectives on the role of science communication in their own formal science and engineering education. More broadly, we examined participants’ understanding of their perceived responsibilities of communicating science and engineering to the general public when an issue contains complex social and ethical implications (SEI). The study is contextualized in the emergent technology of nanotechnology for which SEI are of particular concern and for which the general public often perceives conflicting risks and benefits. Findings indicate that student participants’ hold similar views on the need for their own training in communication as future scientists and engineers. When asked about the role that ethics and risk perception plays in research, development, and public communication of nanotechnology, participants demonstrate similar trajectories of perspectives that are, however, often anchored in very different levels of beginning concern. Results are discussed in the context of considerations for science communication training within formal science education curricula globally.Peer reviewe
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