9 research outputs found

    Segmental meniscal replacement

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    Meniscal damage results in higher peak stress on the articular cartilage and leads to cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis. Thus, in recent years there has been an increasing tendency to “save the meniscus” and to repair meniscal defects. However, this is not always possible and restoring meniscal function using scaffolds fulfills this gap. This approach requires the physical presence of an artificial meniscus to allow successful migration and colonization with precursor cells and vessels that lead to the development of organized meniscal tissue. Two meniscal scaffolds are currently available; 1 composed of aliphatic polyurethane named Actifit (Orteq Sports Medicine, Ltd.), and one based on collagen type I fibers called Collagen Meniscus Implant (Stryker Kalamazoo). Both provide an effective and safe solution to treat symptomatic patients with segmental meniscus mid-substance defects. Indeed, recent studies have demonstrated their ability to significantly improve patient satisfaction and clinical evaluation in the mid- to long-term. As such, these approaches hold great promise as a meniscus preservation option to facilitate long-term knee health

    Evaluating the public acceptance of sustainable mobility interventions responding to Covid-19: The case of the Great Walk of Athens and the importance of citizen engagement

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    COVID-19, the most wide-spread and disruptive pandemic in over a century, enforced emergency urban design responses meaning to recalibrate transport provision globally. This is the first work that systematically evaluates the ‘public acceptance’ as a proxy for ‘policy success’ and ‘potential for longer-term viability’ of the high-profile sustainable transport intervention package introduced in 2020 in the capital city of Greece known as the Great Walk of Athens (GWA). This is achieved through a twin statistical analysis of an e-survey that looked into the attitudes and urban mobility experiences of Athenians accessing the area of the trial daily. The research enabled a comparison between the pre- and post-implementation traffic situations and provided details about specific measures packaged in the GWA project. Our results suggest that walking and cycling uptake were only marginally improved. Traffic delays for car users were considerable. Car usage declined somewhat, with the exception of ride-sharing. Public transport ridership numbers suffered a lot because of concerns about sharing closed space with many others during a pandemic. Men and people on low income were more likely to agree with the ‘change’. Naturally this was the case for people identified as primarily cyclists and pedestrians. The most impactful package elements in terms of car lane sacrifices (i.e., the redevelopment of Panepistimiou Street) had the lowest acceptability rates. A key reason that underpinned people\u27s hesitation to approve the GWA initiative was the lack of public consultation in the decision-making that shaped the project. Our study provides evidence-based generalisable lessons for similar metropolitan environments looking to implement more or evaluate for possibly making permanent ‘rushed’ anti-Covid street redevelopment measures

    Evaluating the public acceptance of sustainable mobility interventions responding to Covid-19:The case of the Great Walk of Athens and the importance of citizen engagement

    No full text
    COVID-19, the most wide-spread and disruptive pandemic in over a century, enforced emergency urban design responses meaning to recalibrate transport provision globally. This is the first work that systematically evaluates the ‘public acceptance’ as a proxy for ‘policy success’ and ‘potential for longer-term viability’ of the high-profile sustainable transport intervention package introduced in 2020 in the capital city of Greece known as the Great Walk of Athens (GWA). This is achieved through a twin statistical analysis of an e-survey that looked into the attitudes and urban mobility experiences of Athenians accessing the area of the trial daily. The research enabled a comparison between the pre- and post-implementation traffic situations and provided details about specific measures packaged in the GWA project. Our results suggest that walking and cycling uptake were only marginally improved. Traffic delays for car users were considerable. Car usage declined somewhat, with the exception of ride-sharing. Public transport ridership numbers suffered a lot because of concerns about sharing closed space with many others during a pandemic. Men and people on low income were more likely to agree with the ‘change’. Naturally this was the case for people identified as primarily cyclists and pedestrians. The most impactful package elements in terms of car lane sacrifices (i.e., the redevelopment of Panepistimiou Street) had the lowest acceptability rates. A key reason that underpinned people's hesitation to approve the GWA initiative was the lack of public consultation in the decision-making that shaped the project. Our study provides evidence-based generalisable lessons for similar metropolitan environments looking to implement more or evaluate for possibly making permanent ‘rushed’ anti-Covid street redevelopment measures

    A Structural Analysis for the Categorization of the Negative Externalities of Transport and the Hierarchical Organization of Sustainable Mobility’s Strategies

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    Transport systems are capable of contributing to the economic robustness of a geographic area and the well-being of its inhabitants via the supply of the necessary assets for the mobility of people and goods. However, transport projects have the capacity to produce several negative externalities such as water pollution, air pollution, barrier effects, noise, and ecological impact, which affect the quality of people’s life. Considering these facts, the main purpose of this study is to indicate methodologically how the negative externalities of transport are interlinked, so that to promote sustainable mobility development. This paper reveals via the method of structural analysis, the interrelations between the negative externalities of transport, firstly to organize them hierarchically and secondly to evaluate the potential of sustainable mobility strategies concerning the co-benefits generated by their implementation for society. The results show that the negative externalities of transport are not isolated phenomena; on the contrary, they are interlinked and can be organised hierarchically according to the relationships between them so that certain public policies can be prioritized and the negative impacts of transport can be tackled more effectively. The most critical negative externalities are the invasion of public space for the construction of more roads, along with road accidents, congestion, and local air pollution. On the other hand, the most important group of strategies for sustainable mobility are the ones oriented to urban design, and more specifically to transit-oriented development

    MEDSAL Project - Salinization of critical groundwater reserves in coastal Mediterranean areas: Identification, risk assessment and sustainable management with the use of integrated modelling and smart ICT tools

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    MEDSAL is a research project (www.medsal.net) focusing on groundwater salinization in the Mediterranean area, funded by the PRIMA Program (Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area), and running for 36 months starting from September 2019. MEDSAL constitutes a joint Euro-Mediterranean cooperation network of organizations from Mediterranean countries and associated states of the EU contributing national funds. The partnership involves eight academic partners from seven countries (plus an external collaborator – private firm), covering a wide range of academic experts in various scientific fields (e.g. hydrogeology, hydrogeochemistry, environmental isotopes, modeling, hydro-informatics, geostatistics, machine learning). MEDSAL aims at developing innovative methods to identify various sources and processes of salinization and at providing an integrated set of modeling tools that capture the dynamics and risks of salinization. Thereby, it aims to secure the availability and quality of groundwater reserves in Mediterranean coastal areas, which are amongst the most vulnerable regions in the world to water scarcity and quality degradation. MEDSAL encompasses six (6) test sites located in five (5) countries: Rhodope, Greece, (ii) Samos Island, Greece, (iii) Salento, Italy, (iv) Tarsus, Turkey, (v)Boufichia, Tunisia, and (vi) Bouteldja, Algeria. MEDSAL’s principal objectives are the following: a) Deliver new tools for the identification of complex salinization sources and processes, b) Exploit the potential of Artificial intelligence and Deep Learning methods to improve detection of patterns in multi-dimensional hydrogeochemical and isotope data, c) Elaborate tailor-made risk assessment and development of management plans by coupling salinization forecasts with climate change impacts and future scenarios, and d) Develop a public domain web-GIS Observatory for monitoring, alerting, decision support and management of coastal groundwater reserves around the Mediterranean. MEDSAL is expected to have a significant impact on water resources availability and quality by improving the identification and development of adequate strategies and measures for the protection and management of salinization in coastal aquifers. In this context, MEDSAL will provide innovative classification and detection methods of groundwater salinization types for Mediterranean coasts, also in complex karstic and data-scarce environments. These outcomes will be reached by better integration of hydrogeochemical and environmental isotope data with physical-based groundwater flow and transport models and advanced geostatistics. Artificial intelligence and deep learning methods will be also used to improve the detection of patterns in multi-dimensional hydrogeochemical and isotope data
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