647 research outputs found

    Cysteine from Feather Meal And Sulfur Amino Acid Requirements for Growing Steers

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    Ninety individually fed steers were used to determine how cysteine from feather meal could replace dietary methionine in meeting their requirements for sulfur amino acids. Treatment proteins included blood meal, blood meal plus incremental levels of feather meal or blood meal plus incremental levels of rumen-protected methionine. Addition of sulfur amino acids to blood meal from feather meal or rumen-protected methionine improved average daily gain (P \u3c .05). Rumen-protected methionine elicited a greater gain response than feather meal (P \u3c .05). Feather meal can provide some of the sulfur amino acids lacking in blood meal. However, additional methionine may further improve performance

    Wheat Straw, Distillers Grains, and Beet Pulp for Late Gestation Beef Cows

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    The feeding value of a mixture of 30:70 wet distillers grains:wheat straw or 20:20:60 wet distillers grains:beet pulp:wheat straw (DM) for late gestation beef cows was estimated. In Experiment 1, cows limit fed distillers grains and wheat straw gained as much weight and body condition as cows limit fed alfalfa hay. In Experiment 2, cows fed wet distillers grains and wheat straw or wet distillers grains, beet pulp, and wheat straw gained more weight and improved body condition compared with cows fed alfalfa hay. The results of these experiments indicate cows in late gestation will maintain body condition when limit fed by-products and crop residues to meet their energy requirements

    Determinants of Profit Variability in Calf-Fed and Yearling Production Systems

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    Factors that were determinants of profit variability in calf-fed and yearling beef production systems were identified and ranked. The analysis indicated cattle prices have the greatest influence on profit variation for both systems and on all backgrounding and finishing phases of the yearling system. Prices of feedstuffs (i.e., corn prices, wet corn gluten feed prices, and pasture and cornstalk rental rates) were the next most important factors explaining profit risk. Cattle performance variables and interest rates had the smallest impact on profit variation

    Wheat Straw, Distillers Grains, and Beet Pulp for Late Gestation Beef Cows

    Get PDF
    The feeding value of a mixture of 30:70 wet distillers grains:wheat straw or 20:20:60 wet distillers grains:beet pulp:wheat straw (DM) for late gestation beef cows was estimated. In Experiment 1, cows limit fed distillers grains and wheat straw gained as much weight and body condition as cows limit fed alfalfa hay. In Experiment 2, cows fed wet distillers grains and wheat straw or wet distillers grains, beet pulp, and wheat straw gained more weight and improved body condition compared with cows fed alfalfa hay. The results of these experiments indicate cows in late gestation will maintain body condition when limit fed by-products and crop residues to meet their energy requirements

    Determinants of Profit Variability in Calf-Fed and Yearling Production Systems

    Get PDF
    Factors that were determinants of profit variability in calf-fed and yearling beef production systems were identified and ranked. The analysis indicated cattle prices have the greatest influence on profit variation for both systems and on all backgrounding and finishing phases of the yearling system. Prices of feedstuffs (i.e., corn prices, wet corn gluten feed prices, and pasture and cornstalk rental rates) were the next most important factors explaining profit risk. Cattle performance variables and interest rates had the smallest impact on profit variation

    Effects of Manipulating Protein and Phosphorus Nutrition of Feedlot Cattle on Nutrient Management and the Environment

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    Feedlot nutrition will play a role in meeting challenges such as nutrient management. Nitrogen and phosphorus are two nutrients that are currently studied in this context. One nutritional method is formulating diets not to exceed requirements for nitrogen and phosphorus. Requirements are different for calves and yearlings. The requirements also change during the finishing period. Phosphorus requirements have not been extensively studied for feedlot cattle between 270 and 600 kg. Therefore, P requirements studies were conducted to determine the P requirement of calves (265 kg) and yearlings (385 kg). The requirement was not detected with P levels as low as 0.14 (yearlings) and 0.16% (calves) of diet DM based on performance and bone ash. Compared to NRC-predicted P requirements, P intakes ranged from 76 to 190% (calves) and 71 to 162% (yearlings). In separate nutrient balance experiments, decreasing dietary P to NRC-predicted requirements (0.22 to 0.28%) did not influence gain but decreased P input by 33 to 45% and excretion by 40 to 50% compared to the industry average (0.35% P). The metabolizable protein (MP) system was recently adopted and may allow more accurate diet formulation for protein, thereby decreasing N excretion. Compared to the industry average (13.5% CP) and formulation with the CP system, using the NRC model and phase-feeding not to exceed MP requirements over the feeding period decreased N inputs by 10 to 20% for calves and yearlings without affecting ADG. Decreasing N inputs led to a concomitant decrease in N excretion (12 to 21%) and volatilization (15 to 33%) in open-dirt feedlot pens. Nitrogen losses are variable with time of year, with averages of 60 to 70% of excreted N lost during the summer months and 40% lost from November to May feeding periods. Protein requirements are continually being refined as more research data are collected. However, formulation to meet and not exceed protein requirements and removal of P supplements are important nutritional management options to help feedlots become more environmentally sustainable

    Effects of Manipulating Protein and Phosphorus Nutrition of Feedlot Cattle on Nutrient Management and the Environment

    Get PDF
    Feedlot nutrition will play a role in meeting challenges such as nutrient management. Nitrogen and phosphorus are two nutrients that are currently studied in this context. One nutritional method is formulating diets not to exceed requirements for nitrogen and phosphorus. Requirements are different for calves and yearlings. The requirements also change during the finishing period. Phosphorus requirements have not been extensively studied for feedlot cattle between 270 and 600 kg. Therefore, P requirements studies were conducted to determine the P requirement of calves (265 kg) and yearlings (385 kg). The requirement was not detected with P levels as low as 0.14 (yearlings) and 0.16% (calves) of diet DM based on performance and bone ash. Compared to NRC-predicted P requirements, P intakes ranged from 76 to 190% (calves) and 71 to 162% (yearlings). In separate nutrient balance experiments, decreasing dietary P to NRC-predicted requirements (0.22 to 0.28%) did not influence gain but decreased P input by 33 to 45% and excretion by 40 to 50% compared to the industry average (0.35% P). The metabolizable protein (MP) system was recently adopted and may allow more accurate diet formulation for protein, thereby decreasing N excretion. Compared to the industry average (13.5% CP) and formulation with the CP system, using the NRC model and phase-feeding not to exceed MP requirements over the feeding period decreased N inputs by 10 to 20% for calves and yearlings without affecting ADG. Decreasing N inputs led to a concomitant decrease in N excretion (12 to 21%) and volatilization (15 to 33%) in open-dirt feedlot pens. Nitrogen losses are variable with time of year, with averages of 60 to 70% of excreted N lost during the summer months and 40% lost from November to May feeding periods. Protein requirements are continually being refined as more research data are collected. However, formulation to meet and not exceed protein requirements and removal of P supplements are important nutritional management options to help feedlots become more environmentally sustainable

    Effect of Micro-Aid\u3csup\u3e®\u3c/sup\u3e Supplementation on Nitrogen Losses from Manure

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    A 2x2 factorial designed experiment was used to study the effects of Micro-Aid and time on OM and N losses from manure, in a simulated feedlot pen setting. Manure was collected from cattle on a common diet, except for the addition of 1 g Micro-Aid /steer daily. Losses of OM were greater at 60 d than 30 d, and greater for control than Micro-Aid. Nitrogen losses at d 30 were similar between treatments but control pans had greater N losses at d 60. Feeding Micro-Aid to cattle may inhibit N volatilization from manure, enhancing the fertilizer value of manure

    Transitioning Cattle from RAMP\u3csup\u3e®\u3c/sup\u3e to a Finishing Diet on Feed Intake and Ruminal pH

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    A metabolism trial was conducted where steers were adapted to high grain diets using a traditional approach or one of two RAMP® adaptation programs. RAMP programs adapted cattle to a finishing diet either gradually over 28 days in four steps or switched to a finishing ration without steps. Feed intake and ruminal pH were monitored continuously throughout the trial. Cattle on the 4-STEP treatment spent more time eating compared to other treatments but total feed consumption was similar among treatments. Ruminal pH was greater for cattle on RAMP adaptation programs when compared to traditional grain adaptation. Cattle fed RAMP for 10 days can be transitioned directly to a finishing diet containing 47.5% Sweet Bran®

    Effect of Micro-Aid\u3csup\u3e®\u3c/sup\u3e Supplementation on Nitrogen Losses from Manure

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    A 2x2 factorial designed experiment was used to study the effects of Micro-Aid and time on OM and N losses from manure, in a simulated feedlot pen setting. Manure was collected from cattle on a common diet, except for the addition of 1 g Micro-Aid /steer daily. Losses of OM were greater at 60 d than 30 d, and greater for control than Micro-Aid. Nitrogen losses at d 30 were similar between treatments but control pans had greater N losses at d 60. Feeding Micro-Aid to cattle may inhibit N volatilization from manure, enhancing the fertilizer value of manure
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