3,311 research outputs found

    Formal Learning in an Informal Setting – The First Semester Student Learning Experience Outside the Classroom.

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    During a visit to the Centre for Active Learning at the University of Gloucestershire by members of the Information and Learning Service staff, a common interest in the student learning experience outside the formal classroom setting was identified. Both universities were undertaking extensive work on their provision of informal learning environments and it was felt a joint project to investigate the students’ learning experience and preferences would be useful to inform these developments with a specific focus on e-learning and active learning

    Selective mutism in children

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    This thesis focuses on selective mutism, a rare childhood disorder in which the child refuses to speak in many situations and there are no underlying medical or speech disabilities that explains their behavior. The research of the paper focuses on the many different factors that can have a role in the development of selective mutism, including parent child relationship as well as the development of anxiety. Also discussed are the impacts this disorder can have on a child’s development, two main areas being academics and social relationships. Many teachers and parents do not have a full understanding of selective mutism, which may hinder the support that is made available to the child as the age of onset often occurs around the child’s entrance to school. This makes selective mutism an important topic because there is a need for educating caregivers. Part of this project will be surveying teachers in order to gain an understanding of their knowledge of selective mutism and what can be done to bring more awareness to the disorder. This thesis will also discuss the positive outlook for selective mutism as there are many different types of treatments and approaches available for helping the child overcome their intense fear of speaking. (Author abstract)Kennedy, S. (2014). Selective mutism in children. Retrieved from http://academicarchive.snhu.ed

    The Carpenter Bees

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    The development of a functional food breakfast and its effects on gluco-regulation, cognitive performance, mood and satiety in adolescents

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    It is well documented that eating a regular breakfast is associated with benefits to markers of metabolic health and cognitive performance. The composition of breakfast differentially affects the metabolic response which may also have implications for cognitive performance. To date, much of the research on gluco-regulation is in adults, and no studies have investigated the effects of a functional-food breakfast (FB) on gluco-regulation and cognitive performance, mood and satiety in adolescents. Therefore, this thesis aims to address this research gap through the implementation of a series of five research studies. The primary aim was to investigate the effects of a FB which included ingredients selected for their potential to improve gluco-regulation (blueberries, baobab, cinnamon and oats) on measures of gluco-regulation (glucose response (GR) and insulin response (IR)) compared to a control breakfast (CB), and ready to eat cereal (RTEC) (adults only). Secondary aims were to measure: cognitive performance (using a map recall and delayed word recall task), mood (using the 'Activation–Deactivation Check List’) and satiety (using VAS scales). Measures were collected at timed intervals over a three-hour period after the three breakfasts. The study was first implemented in healthy adults (n=16, 32.0±10.0 years) in a controlled laboratory environment and found that consumption of the FB resulted in a lower glucose peak and a lower IR AUC, compared to the CB and RTEC (p.05). Two preliminary studies (chapter 3 and 4) contributed to aspects of the FB and CB development (chapter 5) and breakfast study design (chapter 6 and 7). In chapter 3, validation of a novel portable indirect calorimeter in adults (n=20, 38.3 ±11.2 years) resulted in the revision of the main hypothesis (chapter 2), where investigations into the effect of the FB on energy expenditure (EE) was discontinued. In chapter 4, the completion of a breakfast-based questionnaire by adolescents (n=434, 13-15 years) informed the choice of ready to eat cereal (RTEC) on which the breakfast conditions were based (chapter 5). Additionally, these studies made individual contributions to the literature reporting the use of indirect calorimetry in schools to collect body composition measures from adolescents (n=30) (chapter 3) and highlighting implications for the design of breakfast interventions in adolescents (chapter 4). Findings from this thesis suggest that the addition of functional food ingredients to breakfast has the potential to improve gluco-regulation in healthy adults and adolescents. The inclusion of functional food ingredients as part of breakfast should be considered alongside the promotion of breakfast

    Occupation

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    Bringing the Library to the Student Using an Online Marketing Tool.

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    Technological University Dublin Library (DIT), Aungier Street are using the online marketing tool MailChimp to engage first year undergraduates, enhance the first year experience and support their transition into third level education. We have developed a digital library information pack called Library Learning, aimed at first-year undergraduates to lend support as they enter their first year within DIT. The idea of the pack is to lend timely, tailored and subject oriented mailouts to students to assist their successful transition into first year. The pack is also intended as a support to the face-to-face Information and Digital Literacy sessions delivered to students by library staff and allows the opportunity for asynchronous learning. Library Learning consists of 10 scheduled, tailored and branded mailouts sent throughout the first academic year. (See fig 1.) Mailouts are authored by library staff in collaboration with academic staff, the academic calendar, and course content. Student supports such as the Academic Writing Centre are also promoted. Mailout content introduces students to Library services and resources and includes interactive content such as Library videos and guides. It is now in its second year of a pilot. The academic year 2015/16 included two courses. This has grown to now include six undergraduate courses for 2016/2017, five of which are from the College of Business: • BSc in Marketing • BSc in Accounting & Finance • BSc in Economics & Finance • BSc in Human Resource Management • Higher Certificate in Business Studies MailChimp allows us to gather data on the level of individual engagement with each mailout. We can then pass this information on to the lecturers. We are focusing on students who show low levels of engagement. The lecturer is then alerted to the potential need for extra support for students who may not be performing as well as they should in course assignments or exams. Data shows that engagement rates start high but they drop off as the year progresses. Library Learning came about as DIT looked at the overall first-year experience. The project was awarded funding from the Technological University for Dublin (TU4D) under the theme, ‘Re-imagining the Curriculum: Consolidating the First Year Experience’. Student induction is moving from a once off event to a yearlong process and experience. Library Learning allows us to deliver information to the students throughout the academic year in a format that meets their needs at their point of need. The mailouts allow us to promote our on and off-campus support services and places us among the community of supports available to them within DIT. Instead of waiting for the student to visit the Library in person or online, we are now reaching out to the student. The information they need is personalised and arrives directly into their inbox. Now the Library is wherever the student is
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