1,172 research outputs found

    Just Words: Understanding the Fullness of the Gospel

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    Author: Preus, Jacob A O. (Jacob Aall Ottesen). Title: Just words. Publisher: St Louis : Concordia Publishing House, 2000

    The Undoing of Death: Sermons for Holy Week and Easter

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    Author: Rutledge, Fleming. Title: Undoing of death. Publisher: Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002

    Just Words: Understanding the Fullness of the Gospel

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    Author: Preus, Jacob A O. (Jacob Aall Ottesen). Title: Just words. Publisher: St Louis : Concordia Publishing House, 2000

    Effects of Oil Field Brines on Biological Integrity of Two Tributaries of the Little Muskingum River, Southeastern Ohio

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    Author Institution: Department of Biology and Department of Geology, The University of AkronTwo headwater tributaries of the Little Muskingum River were compared to assess possible effects of oil field brines on biological integrity of the streams. Diatom, macroinvertebrate, and fish communities were analyzed during the summer, 1990, for possible changes in community-structure caused by brines. Dissolved chemicals associated with brines and natural surface waters were quantified monthly between May and October, 1991. Cranenest Fork, with a lower density of wells producing brines than Straight Fork, had a slightly more integrated benthic macroinvertebrate community and lower proportions of salt-tolerant diatoms. Twelve of fifteen measures of benthic macroinvertebrate community structure were consistent with expected effects of greater brine enrichment in Straight Fork. Both streams, however, conformed to benthic macroinvertebrate criteria for protection of aquatic life established in Ohio Water Quality Standards. The major difference between streams was the larger (13:1) percentage of salt-tolerant diatoms such as Navicula salinarum,Navicula tripunctata, andNavicula viridula v. avenacea in Straight Fork than in Cranenest Fork. Fish communities were similar between streams

    An integrated geologic framework for EarthScope's US array

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    Peer Reviewedhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/95254/1/eost15515.pd

    Deweyan tools for inquiry and the epistemological context of critical pedagogy

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    This article develops the notion of resistance as articulated in the literature of critical pedagogy as being both culturally sponsored and cognitively manifested. To do so, the authors draw upon John Dewey\u27s conception of tools for inquiry. Dewey provides a way to conceptualize student resistance not as a form of willful disputation, but instead as a function of socialization into cultural models of thought that actively truncate inquiry. In other words, resistance can be construed as the cognitive and emotive dimensions of the ongoing failure of institutions to provide ideas that help individuals both recognize social problems and imagine possible solutions. Focusing on Dewey\u27s epistemological framework, specifically tools for inquiry, provides a way to grasp this problem. It also affords some innovative solutions; for instance, it helps conceive of possible links between the regular curriculum and the study of specific social justice issues, a relationship that is often under-examined. The aims of critical pedagogy depend upon students developing dexterity with the conceptual tools they use to make meaning of the evidence they confront; these are background skills that the regular curriculum can be made to serve even outside social justice-focused curricula. Furthermore, the article concludes that because such inquiry involves the exploration and potential revision of students\u27 world-ordering beliefs, developing flexibility in how one thinks may be better achieved within academic subjects and topics that are not so intimately connected to students\u27 current social lives, especially where students may be directly implicated

    Prospectus, September 10, 1980

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    ARE YOU A \u27REAL STUDENT\u27?; Parkland People; Gamut challenges you; Emergency course offered; Oops!; Stugo hopefuls list qualifications; Kinks wow U of I fans; Coates announces student audtions; Country music is moving up; Women\u27s Program offers self-series; Classifieds; Students are....well, just students; Student disappointed; Correction; Science You Can See: Ask not what Cable T.V. can do for you, ask what you can do for Cable T.V.; B-ball deadline is Sept. 22; Football and tennis are IM openers; PC Datebook; Golfers begin season with win over Danville; After some surprises last week, Fast Freddy is ready; LaBadie confident of his runners; Fast Freddy Contest; Bench Warmer: Cobras show talenthttps://spark.parkland.edu/prospectus_1980/1022/thumbnail.jp

    Aptamer-based multiplexed proteomic technology for biomarker discovery

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    Interrogation of the human proteome in a highly multiplexed and efficient manner remains a coveted and challenging goal in biology. We present a new aptamer-based proteomic technology for biomarker discovery capable of simultaneously measuring thousands of proteins from small sample volumes (15 [mu]L of serum or plasma). Our current assay allows us to measure ~800 proteins with very low limits of detection (1 pM average), 7 logs of overall dynamic range, and 5% average coefficient of variation. This technology is enabled by a new generation of aptamers that contain chemically modified nucleotides, which greatly expand the physicochemical diversity of the large randomized nucleic acid libraries from which the aptamers are selected. Proteins in complex matrices such as plasma are measured with a process that transforms a signature of protein concentrations into a corresponding DNA aptamer concentration signature, which is then quantified with a DNA microarray. In essence, our assay takes advantage of the dual nature of aptamers as both folded binding entities with defined shapes and unique sequences recognizable by specific hybridization probes. To demonstrate the utility of our proteomics biomarker discovery technology, we applied it to a clinical study of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We identified two well known CKD biomarkers as well as an additional 58 potential CKD biomarkers. These results demonstrate the potential utility of our technology to discover unique protein signatures characteristic of various disease states. More generally, we describe a versatile and powerful tool that allows large-scale comparison of proteome profiles among discrete populations. This unbiased and highly multiplexed search engine will enable the discovery of novel biomarkers in a manner that is unencumbered by our incomplete knowledge of biology, thereby helping to advance the next generation of evidence-based medicine
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