34 research outputs found

    Robotic Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Coronary Heart Disease: Applications and Recent Advances

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    Traditional percutaneous coronary intervention (T-PCI) has long been an effective method for treating coronary heart disease (CHD), but the radiation hazards and orthopedic injuries among T-PCI operators are concerning. These problems have been mitigated with the emergence of robotic percutaneous coronary intervention (R-PCI), which is expected to increase intervention accuracy and safety. In this review, we first summarize the current status of PCI development, including robot systems, and PCI application and evaluation. Second, we compare T-PCI and R-PCI to identify the benefits for patients and physicians. In addition, we describe a new R-PCI system, R-PCI WSER-CD01, which incorporates multi-instrument collaborative delivery and provides full-process assistance in minimally invasive vascular intervention. This system introduces three key innovations that address safety concerns, and improve the accuracy, wire compatibility, and remote operation capabilities of existing of vascular intervention robot systems. Finally, we discuss prospects for the development of R-PCI. As an emerging technology, R-PCI aligns well with the trends of precision medicine and telemedicine, and therefore warrants continued innovation

    Prognostic value of N-terminal Pro–B-Type natriuretic peptide in patients with intermediate coronary lesions

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    BackgroundThe optimal treatment strategy for patients with coronary intermediate lesions, defined as diameter stenosis of 50–70%, remains a great challenge for cardiologists. Identification of potential biomarkers predictive of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) risk may assist in risk stratification and clinical decision.MethodsA total of 1,187 patients with intermediate coronary lesions and available N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels were enrolled in the current study. A baseline NT-proBNP level was obtained. The primary endpoint was defined as MACEs, the composite endpoint of all-cause death and non-fatal myocardial infarction. A multivariate Cox regression model was used to explore the association between NT-proBNP level and MACE risk.ResultsThe mean age of the study cohort was 59.2 years. A total of 68 patients experienced MACE during a median follow-up of 6.1 years. Restricted cubic spline analysis delineated a linear relationship between the baseline NT-proBNP level and MACE risk. Both univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that an increased NT-proBNP level was associated with an increased risk of MACE [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per doubling: 1.412, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.022–1.952, p = 0.0365]. This association remains consistent in clinical meaningful subgroups according to age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and diabetes.ConclusionAn increased NT-proBNP level is associated with an increased risk of MACE in patients with intermediate coronary lesions and may serve as the potential biomarker for risk stratification and treatment decision guidance

    Intensified glycemic control by HbA1c for patients with coronary heart disease and Type 2 diabetes: a review of findings and conclusions

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    Abstract The occurrence and development of coronary heart disease (CHD) are closely linked to fluctuations in blood glucose levels. While the efficacy of intensified treatment guided by HbA1c levels remains uncertain for individuals with diabetes and CHD, this review summarizes the findings and conclusions regarding HbA1c in the context of CHD. Our review showed a curvilinear correlation between regulated level of HbA1c and therapeutic effectiveness of intensified glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. It is necessary to optimize the dynamic monitoring indicators of HbA1c, combine genetic profiles, haptoglobin phenotypes for example and select more suitable hypoglycemic drugs to establish more appropriate glucose-controlling guideline for patients with CHD at different stage of diabetes

    The 11-Year Prognostic Impact of Chronic Total Occlusion in the Noninfarct-Related Coronary Artery on Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

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    Background. The prognostic significance of CTO in the non-IRA in patients with AMI has been under dispute. Relevant long-term follow-up studies are lacking. Hypothesis. CTO in the non-IRA is an independent predictor of poor long-term prognosis in patients with AMI. Methods. We prospectively enrolled 2336 patients with AMI who received emergent percutaneous coronary intervention successfully from January 2006 to May 2011. Our primary endpoints included death from cardiovascular causes, recurrent myocardial infarction, stroke, and target-vessel revascularization. We adopted Cox regression analysis adjusted for confounders to analyze the impact of CTO in the non-IRA on long-term mortalities. Results. We identified 628 (27.6%) subjects with CTO in the non-IRA among 2282 AMI patients. After a mean follow-up duration of 134.3 months, we found the CTO group had significantly higher MACCE rate than the group without CTO (30.4% versus 24.3%, P=0.004). CTO in the non-IRA independently predicted 11-year MACCE in the male AMI subgroup (hazard ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.54, P=0.01) and in the male NSTEMI subgroup (hazard ratio 1.53, 95% confidence interval 1.09 to 2.15, P=0.02). In the CTO group, three-vessel disease independently predicted 11 year MACCE (hazard ratio 2.05, 95% confidence interval 1.29 to 3.28, P=0.002). Conclusions. Our long-term observational study supported the association between CTO in the non-IRA and poorer prognosis in AMI patients undergoing primary PCI. We identified the group with the three-vessel disease as a high-risk subgroup in patients with CTO in the non-IRA

    The value of the MIND diet in the primary and secondary prevention of hypertension: A cross-sectional and longitudinal cohort study from NHANES analysis

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    BackgroundThe Mediterranean-Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension for neurodegenerative delay (MIND) has been regarded as a novel healthy dietary pattern with huge benefits. However, its value in preventing and treating hypertension has not been investigated. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of adhering to the MIND diet on the prevalence of hypertension in the entire population and long-term mortality in hypertensive patients.MethodsIn this cross-sectional and longitudinal study, 6,887 participants consisting of 2,984 hypertensive patients in the National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys were analyzed and divided into 3 groups according to the MIND diet scores (MDS; groups of MDS-low [<7.5], MDS-medium [7.5–8.0] and MDS-high [≥8.5]). In the longitudinal analysis, the primary outcome was all-cause death and the secondary outcome was cardiovascular (CV) death. Hypertensive patients received a follow-up with a mean time of 9.25 years (median time: 111.1 months, range 2 to 120 months). Multivariate logistics regression models and Cox proportional hazards models were applicated to estimate the association between MDS and outcomes. Restricted cubic spline (RCS) was used to estimate the dose–response relationship.ResultsCompared with the MDS-low group, participants in the MDS-high group presented a significantly lower prevalence of hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.58, 0.97, p = 0.040) and decreased levels of systolic blood pressure (β = −0.41, p = 0.033). Among hypertensive patients, 787 (26.4%) all-cause death consisting of 293 (9.8%) CV deaths were recorded during a 10-year follow-up. Hypertensive patients in the MDS-high group presented a significantly lower prevalence of ASCVD (OR = 0.71, 95% CI, 0.51, 0.97, p = 0.043), and lower risk of all-cause death (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.69, 95% CI, 0.58, 0.81, p < 0.001) and CV death (HR = 0.62, 95% CI, 0.46, 0.85, p for trend = 0.001) when compared with those in the MDS-low group.ConclusionFor the first time, this study revealed the values of the MIND diet in the primary and secondary prevention of hypertension, suggesting the MIND diet as a novel anti-hypertensive dietary pattern

    High triglyceride-glucose index predicts cardiovascular events in patients with coronary bifurcation lesions: a large-scale cohort study

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    Abstract Background Coronary bifurcation lesion, as a complex coronary lesion, is associated with higher risk of long-term poor prognosis than non-bifurcation lesions. The triglyceride-glucose (TyG) index has been shown to predict cardiovascular (CV) events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the prognostic value of the TyG index in patients with bifurcation lesions who are at high risk of CV events remains undetermined. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the association between the TyG index and CV events in patients with bifurcation lesions. Methods A total of 4530 consecutive patients with angiography-proven CAD and bifurcation lesions were included in this study from January 2017 to December 2018. The TyG index was calculated as Ln [fasting triglyceride (mg/dL) × fasting plasma glucose (mg/dL)/2]. Patients were assigned into 3 groups according to TyG tertiles (T) (T1: <8.633; T2: 8.633–9.096 and T3: ≥9.096). The primary endpoint was CV events, including CV death, nonfatal myocardial infarction and nonfatal stroke at 3-year follow-up. Restricted cubic spline (RCS) analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard models were used to investigate the associations between the TyG index and study endpoints. Results During a median follow-up of 3.1 years, 141 (3.1%) CV events occurred. RCS analysis demonstrated a linear relationship between the TyG index and events after adjusting for age and male sex (non-linear P = 0.262). After multivariable adjustments, elevated TyG index (both T2 and T3) was significantly associated with the risk of CV events (hazard ratio [HR], 1.68; 95% confidence interval [CI],1.06–2.65; HR, 2.10; 95%CI, 1.28–3.47, respectively). When study patients were further stratified according to glycemic status, higher TyG index was associated with significantly higher risk of CV events in diabetic patients after adjusting for confounding factors (T3 vs. T1; HR, 2.68; 95%CI, 1.17–6.11). In addition, subgroup analysis revealed consistent associations of the TyG index with 3-year CV events across various subgroups. Furthermore, adding the TyG index to the original model significantly improved the predictive performance. Conclusions High TyG index was associated with CV events in patients with bifurcation lesions, suggesting the TyG index could help in risk stratification and prognosis in this population

    Independent Prognostic Value of High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein in Patients with Coronary Artery Ectasia

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    Background: Despite its severity, coronary artery ectasia (CAE) is still poorly understood. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has been recognized as a prognostic factor in some cardiovascular diseases but not assessed in CAE. The aim of this observational study was to investigate the prognostic value of hs-CRP in CAE. Methods: Our analysis evaluated the effect of the baseline hs-CRP on cardiovascular events (CVs) (cardiac death and nonfetal myocardial infarction) in consecutively enrolled stable CAE patients. We used the Cox proportional hazards regression models to examine the association between baseline hs-CRP level and follow-up CVs in CAE. The net reclassification improvement and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) of hs-CRP were also assessed. Results: We obtained the follow-up results of 540 patients over a median follow-up period of 36 (37.41 ± 15.88) months. The multivariable Cox analysis showed that the hs-CRP was a significant predictor of adverse outcomes in CAE (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.31–6.81, P = 0.0091). In Kaplan–Meier analysis, the group with hs-CRP >3 mg/L had a lower cumulative 66-month event-free survival rate (log-rank test for trend, P = 0.0235) and a higher risk of CVs (HR = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.22–5.77, P = 0.0140) than the group with hs-CRP ≤3 mg/L. Hs-CRP added predictive information beyond that given by the baseline model comprising the classical risk factors (P value for IDI = 0.0330). Conclusions: A higher level of hs-CRP was independently associated with cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction in CAE patients. The hs-CRP level may therefore provide prognostic information for the risk stratification of CAE patients
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