10 research outputs found

    Dose-Dependent Effects of Amino Acids on Clinical Outcomes in Adult Medical Inpatients Receiving Only Parenteral Nutrition: A Retrospective Cohort Study Using a Japanese Medical Claims Database

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    The majority of inpatients requiring parenteral nutrition (PN) do not receive adequate amino acid, which may negatively impact clinical outcomes. We investigated the influence of amino acid doses on clinical outcomes in medical adult inpatients fasting >10 days and receiving only PN, using Japanese medical claims database. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality, and the secondary endpoints included deterioration of activities of daily living (ADL), intravenous catheter infection, hospital readmission, hospital length of stay (LOS), and total medical costs. Patients were divided into four groups according to their mean prescribed daily amino acid doses from Days 4 to 10 of fasting: Adequate (>= 0.8 g/kg/day), Moderate (>= 0.6-= 0.4-<0.6 g/kg/day), and Very low (<0.4 g/kg/day). Multivariate logistic or multiple regression analyses were performed with adjustments for patient characteristics (total n = 86,702). The Adequate group was used as the reference in all analyses. For the Moderate, Low, and Very low groups, adjusted ORs (95% CI) of in-hospital mortality were 1.20 (1.14-1.26), 1.43 (1.36-1.51), and 1.72 (1.62-1.82), respectively, and for deterioration of ADL were 1.21 (1.11-1.32), 1.34 (1.22-1.47), and 1.22 (1.09-1.37), respectively. Adjusted regression coefficients (95% CI) of hospital LOS were 1.2 (0.4-2.1), 1.5 (0.6-2.4), and 2.9 (1.8-4.1), respectively. Lower prescribed doses of amino acids were associated with worse clinical outcomes including higher in-hospital mortality

    Clinical impact of lipid injectable emulsion in internal medicine inpatients exclusively receiving parenteral nutrition: a propensity score matching analysis from a Japanese medical claims database

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    Background Although guidelines recommend lipid injectable emulsions (ILEs) be used as a part of parenteral nutrition, many patients in Japan receive lipid-free parenteral nutrition. Furthermore, little is known about the effect of ILEs on clinical outcomes in medical inpatients managed with parenteral nutrition. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical impact of ILEs on internal medicine inpatients receiving parenteral nutrition. Methods A propensity score matching (PSM) analysis was performed using a medical claims database covering 451 hospitals in Japan. Participants included the following internal medicine inpatients, ages >= 18 years, fasting > 10 days, and receiving exclusively parenteral nutrition, between 2011 and 2020. Participants were divided into 2 groups: those who did and did not receive ILEs. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality. The secondary endpoints included intravenous catheter infection, activities of daily living (ADL), hospital length of stay (LOS), and total medical costs. To adjust for energy doses, logistic or multiple regression analyses were performed using energy dose as an additional explanatory variable. Results After PSM, 19,602 matched pairs were formed out of 61,437 patients. The ILE group had significantly lower incidences than the non-ILE group of in-hospital mortality (20.3% vs. 26.9%; odds ratio [OR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.72; p < 0.001), deteriorated ADL (10.8% vs. 12.5%; OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.79-0.92; p < 0.001), and shorter LOS (regression coefficient, - 0.8; 95% CI, - 1.6-0.0; p = 0.045). After adjusting for energy dose, these ORs or regression coefficients demonstrated the same tendencies and statistical significance. The mean total medical costs were 21,009intheILEgroupand21,009 in the ILE group and 21,402 in the non-ILE group (p = 0.08), and the adjusted regression coefficient for the ILE vs. the non-ILE group was - 860(95860 (95% CI, - 1252 to - $47). Conclusions ILE use was associated with improved clinical outcomes, including lower in-hospital mortality, in internal medicine inpatients receiving parenteral nutrition

    Injectable Lipid Emulsion and Clinical Outcomes in Patients Exclusively Receiving Parenteral Nutrition in an ICU: A Retrospective Cohort Study Using a Japanese Medical Claims Database

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    Guidelines for the nutritional management of critically ill patients recommend the use of injectable lipid emulsion (ILE) as part of parenteral nutrition (PN). The ILE’s impact on outcomes remains unclear. Associations between prescribed ILE and in-hospital mortality, hospital readmission, and hospital length of stay (LOS) in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) were investigated. Patients who were ≥18 years old in an ICU from January 2010 through June 2020, receiving mechanical ventilation, and fasting for >7 days, were selected from a Japanese medical claims database and divided, based on prescribed ILE during days from 4 to 7 of ICU admission, into 2 groups, no-lipid and with-lipid. Associations between the with-lipid group and in-hospital mortality, hospital readmission, and hospital LOS were evaluated relative to the no-lipid group. Regression analyses and the Cox proportional hazards model were used to calculate the odds ratios (OR) and regression coefficients, and hazard ratios (HR) were adjusted for patient characteristics and parenteral energy and amino acid doses. A total of 20,773 patients were evaluated. Adjusted OR and HR (95% confidence interval) for in-hospital mortality were 0.66 (0.62–0.71) and 0.68 (0.64–0.72), respectively, for the with-lipid group relative to the no-lipid group. No significant differences between the two groups were observed for hospital readmission or hospital LOS. The use of ILE for days 4 to 7 in PN prescribed for critically ill patients, who were in an ICU receiving mechanical ventilation and fasting for more than 7 days, was associated with a significant reduction in in-hospital mortality

    ILC Reference Design Report Volume 1 - Executive Summary

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    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a 200-500 GeV center-of-mass high-luminosity linear electron-positron collider, based on 1.3 GHz superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) accelerating cavities. The ILC has a total footprint of about 31 km and is designed for a peak luminosity of 2x10^34 cm^-2s^-1. This report is the Executive Summary (Volume I) of the four volume Reference Design Report. It gives an overview of the physics at the ILC, the accelerator design and value estimate, the detector concepts, and the next steps towards project realization.The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a 200-500 GeV center-of-mass high-luminosity linear electron-positron collider, based on 1.3 GHz superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) accelerating cavities. The ILC has a total footprint of about 31 km and is designed for a peak luminosity of 2x10^34 cm^-2s^-1. This report is the Executive Summary (Volume I) of the four volume Reference Design Report. It gives an overview of the physics at the ILC, the accelerator design and value estimate, the detector concepts, and the next steps towards project realization

    ILC Reference Design Report Volume 4 - Detectors

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    This report, Volume IV of the International Linear Collider Reference Design Report, describes the detectors which will record and measure the charged and neutral particles produced in the ILC's high energy e+e- collisions. The physics of the ILC, and the environment of the machine-detector interface, pose new challenges for detector design. Several conceptual designs for the detector promise the needed performance, and ongoing detector R&D is addressing the outstanding technological issues. Two such detectors, operating in push-pull mode, perfectly instrument the ILC interaction region, and access the full potential of ILC physics.This report, Volume IV of the International Linear Collider Reference Design Report, describes the detectors which will record and measure the charged and neutral particles produced in the ILC's high energy e+e- collisions. The physics of the ILC, and the environment of the machine-detector interface, pose new challenges for detector design. Several conceptual designs for the detector promise the needed performance, and ongoing detector R&D is addressing the outstanding technological issues. Two such detectors, operating in push-pull mode, perfectly instrument the ILC interaction region, and access the full potential of ILC physics

    ILC Reference Design Report Volume 3 - Accelerator