854 research outputs found

    Intute Repository Search Service (www.intute.ac.uk/irs): A Collaborative Project to Showcase UK Research Output Through Advanced Discovery and Retrieval Facilities

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    4th International Conference on Open RepositoriesThis presentation was part of the session : Conference PostersInstitutional repositories are a major element of the Open Access movement and more specifically in research and education. Their main purpose is to make available as much research output of an institution as possible. Technological changes and developments have an impact on search and discovery functionalities. This impact in turn inspires ideas and projects about useful and efficient ways of searching for academic research output. Intute Repository Search is a project that was set up to develop a UK repository search service to support academic activity. It is funded by the JISC and led by MIMAS in partnership with SHERPA and NaCTEM. Intute Repository Search is designed to serve as a showcase for UK research and education. The technological developments in Intute Repository Search operate to reach the project main targets. This paper will discuss these targets and the project & achievements.JIS

    Assessing Cultural Competence in Health Professional Student\u27s

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    Background-The United States has become a more diverse society and healthcare professionals must be ready to meet the needs of this more culturally diverse society. Students studying in the many areas of healthcare must learn to be culturally competent. To ensure that students are culturally competent and can provide culturally competent care routed in a global perspective their abilities must be developed and assessed. With the absence of any such assessment tool in the literature reviewed the objective set forth in a preliminary study was to develop a tool to assess cultural competence from a global perspective. With this objective met, the objective of this dissertation was to determine the cultural competence levels of entering and exiting health science students within and across differing professional programs. Study Design-Exploratory, Cross-Sectional, Two Group Design. Setting- Seton Hall University Participants- 196 student’s agreed to participate in the study. 146 were entering (first year) students and 59 were exiting (final year) students. Of the 146 entering students 138 of the surveys were usable in the data analysis and 58 of the 59 exiting were usable. Outcome Measures- Health professional students from the School of Health and Medical Science or School of Nursing at Seton Hall University who consented to participate in the study and were first year pre-clinical students completed the Global (worldview) Cultural Competence Survey during the first two weeks of their academic program. Health professional students from the School of Health and Medical Science or School of Nursing who consented to participate in the study and were in their final year post clinical students completed the Global (worldview) Cultural Competence Survey during the last two weeks of their academic program. Results -The analysis revealed that the Global (worldview) Cultural Competence Survey is a valid and reliable tool to assess cultural competence from a global perspective in health professional students. A significant difference in GWCCS total score was observed between entering and exiting students in health sciences- with the exiting students being slightly more culturally competent. However, a statistical significance in GWCCS total score was not observed between entering and exiting students in health sciences based upon their professional program. Conclusion-The findings suggest that exiting health science students are slightly more culturally competent than entering health science students as determined by the Global (worldview) Cultural Competence Survey. Although, exiting health professional students were culturally competent based on this global assessment tool, ideally to enhance their abilities it would be advantageous for them to be culturally proficient. The author offers the Global (worldview) Cultural Competence Survey as a tool which can be used to assess health professional programs curriculums as it relates to developing students cultural proficiency skills from a global perspective

    Assessing Cultural Competence in Health Professional Student\u27s

    Get PDF
    Background-The United States has become a more diverse society and healthcare professionals must be ready to meet the needs of this more culturally diverse society. Students studying in the many areas of healthcare must learn to be culturally competent. To ensure that students are culturally competent and can provide culturally competent care routed in a global perspective their abilities must be developed and assessed. With the absence of any such assessment tool in the literature reviewed the objective set forth in a preliminary study was to develop a tool to assess cultural competence from a global perspective. With this objective met, the objective of this dissertation was to determine the cultural competence levels of entering and exiting health science students within and across differing professional programs. Study Design-Exploratory, Cross-Sectional, Two Group Design. Setting- Seton Hall University Participants- 196 student’s agreed to participate in the study. 146 were entering (first year) students and 59 were exiting (final year) students. Of the 146 entering students 138 of the surveys were usable in the data analysis and 58 of the 59 exiting were usable. Outcome Measures- Health professional students from the School of Health and Medical Science or School of Nursing at Seton Hall University who consented to participate in the study and were first year pre-clinical students completed the Global (worldview) Cultural Competence Survey during the first two weeks of their academic program. Health professional students from the School of Health and Medical Science or School of Nursing who consented to participate in the study and were in their final year post clinical students completed the Global (worldview) Cultural Competence Survey during the last two weeks of their academic program. Results -The analysis revealed that the Global (worldview) Cultural Competence Survey is a valid and reliable tool to assess cultural competence from a global perspective in health professional students. A significant difference in GWCCS total score was observed between entering and exiting students in health sciences- with the exiting students being slightly more culturally competent. However, a statistical significance in GWCCS total score was not observed between entering and exiting students in health sciences based upon their professional program. Conclusion-The findings suggest that exiting health science students are slightly more culturally competent than entering health science students as determined by the Global (worldview) Cultural Competence Survey. Although, exiting health professional students were culturally competent based on this global assessment tool, ideally to enhance their abilities it would be advantageous for them to be culturally proficient. The author offers the Global (worldview) Cultural Competence Survey as a tool which can be used to assess health professional programs curriculums as it relates to developing students cultural proficiency skills from a global perspective

    Obstetrician-Gynecologists’ Knowledge of Health Disparities and Barriers among American Indian/Alaska Native Women in Washington State

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    Background: Health disparities between American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women and other races/ethnicities have long been noted. Obstetricians-Gynecologists (Ob-Gyn) play a significant role in well-woman care and are often the first and most frequent point of medical contact for women, particularly among minority and low-income women. Objective: This study aimed to assess Ob-Gyns’ knowledge, beliefs, and practices related to health disparities among AI/AN women. Method: A self-administered questionnaire, consisting of questions about knowledge, beliefs, and practices of health disparities among AI/AN women, was mailed to 722 members of The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) practicing in the state of Washington in September 2013-February 2014. Results: The majority of respondents were knowledgeable about numerous health care disparities among non-pregnant AI/AN women, while slightly fewer were aware of disparities among pregnant AI/AN patients. Ob-Gyns reported low confidence in their training and knowledge of AI/AN culture and health disparities, but high confidence in their ability to treat AI/AN patients. Participants reported dissatisfaction with their AI/AN patients’ breastfeeding rates. Conclusion: Ob-Gyn knowledge of health disparities among AI/AN women is adequate. In spite of this, barriers to quality care are still present and increased identification and implementation of effective resources is needed

    Assessing the Cognitive and Social Behaviors of Apis mellifera in Finding Food

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    Apis mellifera, or more commonly named, honeybees, are known for their keen ability to navigate the natural world in search of an unpredictable food source; nectar. Honeybees have a trichromatic visual spectrum which allows them to find flowers through vision, but their spectra is based on ultraviolet, blue and green (Riddle, 2016). They also have a circadian rhythm that allows them to know the optimal times to leave the hive in search of food (Moore et al. 1989). The social behaviors of honeybees also closely mirror our own and has caused numerous scientists to investigate whether they have the capacity to hold memories and learn. This experiment was split up into three segments and set out to determine whether honeybees could be trained to fly to a designated spot in order to get food, and whether they could differentiate between two similar food sources

    Exploring digital stories as research in higher education

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    The use of digital storytelling (DST) as a research methodology is gaining momentum. This approach is described as a visual methodology which can be positioned as a form of narrative inquiry and an alternative to an interview. This article explores the use of DST to capture student voices within higher education by outlining recent literature in this area and implications for researchers. It concludes by suggesting that there is significant room for more discussion of how digital storytelling can be used as a method of research to gather the feedback and voices of students. The implications for future researchers concern the complexity of both the method and the analysis, alongside the need for stringent ethical practices concerning the use of images and the potential impact of the storytelling on the research participant

    Teacher well-being and resilience: Podcasts as a tool for global reach

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    Teachers are under increasing pressure inside and outside the classroom, at work and at home. There is a growing need for resilience training and tools to help increase teacher well- being. As part of their global support for teachers, the International Positive Education Network (IPEN) is keen to develop a program to help teachers learn about and develop their resilience. Team Indigo, (four teachers and MAPP students), have developed a plan for a podcast approach to teaching resilience to teachers that includes empirically based strategies and case study interviews with real teachers. A podcast platform has been chosen for ease of production, low cost, global accessibility, and to create an interpersonal feel. There is potential to create ongoing podcasts which would be a ‘value-add’ for the IPEN website as well as a member acquisition tool
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