7,787 research outputs found

    Engelhardt on the Abortion and Euthanasia of Defective Infants

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    Regulatory Takings and Emergency Medical Treatment

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    In this Article, the legal obligations of the counties and of hospitals, respectively, will be examined. An argument will be proffered that the counties have failed to fulfill their statutory obligations to support emergency and other basic medical services for indigent persons. This argument, in conjunction with the fact that hospitals have an unfunded mandate to provide emergency and related medical services to all individuals in need thereof, provides a basis for an argument that the statutory requirement that private hospitals provide emergency and related medical services to indigent patients constitutes a taking of private property for a public purpose. Under this theory, the affected hospitals have a right to reimbursement for uncompensated care that they provide as a result of their statutory obligation

    The Spectroscopic Age of 47 Tuc

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    High signal-to-noise integrated spectra of the metal-rich globular cluster 47 Tuc, spanning the H-gamma(HR) and Fe4668 line indices, have been obtained. The combination of these indices has been suggested (Jones & Worthey 1995, ApJ, 446, L31) as the best available mechanism for cleanly separating the age-metallicity degeneracy which hampers the dating of distant, unresolved, elliptical galaxies. For the first time, we apply this technique to a nearby spheroidal system, 47 Tuc, for which independent ages, based upon more established methods, exist. Such an independent test of the technique's suitability has not been attempted before, but is an essential one before its application to more distant, unresolved, stellar populations can be considered valid. Because of its weak series of Balmer lines, relative to model spectra, our results imply a spectroscopic ``age'' for 47 Tuc well in excess of 20 Gyr, at odds with the colour-magnitude diagram age of 14+/-1 Gyr. The derived metal abundance, however, is consistent with the known value. Emission ``fill-in'' of the H-gamma line as the source of the discrepancy cannot be entirely excluded by existing data, although the observational constraints are restrictive.Comment: 17 pages, 4 figures, LaTeX, accepted for publication in The Astronomical Journal, also available at http://casa.colorado.edu/~bgibson/publications.htm

    Scotland Registry for Ankylosing Spondylitis (SIRAS) – Protocol

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    Funding SIRAS was funded by unrestricted grants from Pfizer and AbbVie. The project was reviewed by both companies, during the award process, for Scientific merit, to ensure that the design did not compromise patient safety, and to assess the global regulatory implications and any impact on regulatory strategy.Publisher PD

    A rapid, chromatography-free route to substituted acridine–isoalloxazine conjugates under microwave irradiation

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    Microwave irradiation was applied to a sequence of condensation reactions from readily available 9-chloroacridines to provide a range of novel acridine–isoalloxazine conjugates. The combination of these two moieties, both of biological interest, was achieved by a chromatography free route

    Predicting response to anti-TNFα therapy among patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) : results from BSRBR-AS

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    We are grateful to the staff of the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register in Axial Spondyloarthritis register and to the recruiting staff at the clinical centres, details of which are available at: https://www.abdn.ac.uk/iahs/research/epidemiology/spondyloarthritis.php#panel1011. We are grateful to Jonathan Lock for commenting on the manuscript. Funding: This work was supported by the British Society for Rheumatology (BSR) who have funded the BSRBR-AS. The BSR received funding for this from Pfizer, AbbVie and UCB. These companies receive advance copies of manuscripts for comments but have no input in to the topics for analysis in the register nor the work involved in undertaking analysis. Analysis of data was supported by the Versus Arthritis/Medical Research Council Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work [grant number 20665].Peer reviewe

    SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITE CHARACTERIZATION USING NON-INTRUSIVE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEY TECHNIQUES AND GEOSTATISTICS

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    Prior to the research reported in this paper, a site-specific hydrogeologic investigation was developed for a closed solid waste facility in Eastern Nebraska using phased subsurface characterizations. Based on the findings of this prior investigation, a surface based geoelectric survey using electromagnetic induction to measure subsurface conductivity was implemented to delineate the vertical and horizontal extent of buffed waste and subsurface contamination. This technique proved to be a key non-intrusive, cost-effective element in the refinement of the second phase of the hydrogeologic investigation. Three-dimensional ordinary kriging was used to estimate conductivity values at unsampled locations. These estimates were utilized to prepare a contaminant plume map and a cross section depicting interpreted subsurface features. Pertinent subsurface features were identified by associating a unique range of conductivity values to that of solid waste, saturated and unsaturated soils and possible leachate migrating from the identified disposal areas

    SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITE CHARACTERIZATION USING NON-INTRUSIVE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEY TECHNIQUES AND GEOSTATISTICS

    Get PDF
    Prior to the research reported in this paper, a site-specific hydrogeologic investigation was developed for a closed solid waste facility in Eastern Nebraska using phased subsurface characterizations. Based on the findings of this prior investigation, a surface based geoelectric survey using electromagnetic induction to measure subsurface conductivity was implemented to delineate the vertical and horizontal extent of buffed waste and subsurface contamination. This technique proved to be a key non-intrusive, cost-effective element in the refinement of the second phase of the hydrogeologic investigation. Three-dimensional ordinary kriging was used to estimate conductivity values at unsampled locations. These estimates were utilized to prepare a contaminant plume map and a cross section depicting interpreted subsurface features. Pertinent subsurface features were identified by associating a unique range of conductivity values to that of solid waste, saturated and unsaturated soils and possible leachate migrating from the identified disposal areas

    The epidemiology of regional and widespread musculoskeletal pain in rural versus urban settings in those ≥55 years

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    Objectives: To examine whether the prevalence of regional and chronic widespread pain (CWP) varies with rurality and to determine the characteristics of persons in rural locations in whom pain is found to be in excess. Methods: Participants, aged ≥55 years, from participating general practices in seven different geographical locations in Scotland were sent a postal questionnaire. The 1-month prevalence of 10 regional pain conditions plus CWP was identified using body manikins. Differences in the prevalence of pain with differing rurality were examined using Chi2 test for trend. Thereafter, among the rural population, the relationships between pain and putative risk factors were examined using Poisson regression. Thus, results are described as risk ratios. Results: There was some evidence to suggest that the prevalence of CWP increased with increasing rurality, although the magnitude of this was slight. No large or significant differences were observed with any regional pain conditions. Factors associated with the reporting of CWP included poor general health, feeling downhearted most of the time and selected measures of social contact. Factors independently associated with CWP included female gender (risk ratio: 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.997–1.55), poor self-rated health (risk ratio: 3.50; 95% CI: 1.92–6.39) and low mood (risk ratio: 1.54; 95% CI: 1.07–2.20). Also, having fewer than 10 people to turn to in a crisis was associated with a decrease in the risk of CWP – risk ratio: 0.68 (95% CI: 0.50–0.93) and 0.78 (95% CI: 0.60–1.02) for those with 5–10 and <5 people, respectively. Conclusions: This study provides no evidence that the prevalence of regional musculoskeletal pain is increased in rural settings, although there is some evidence of a modest increase in CWP. Risk factors for CWP are similar to those seen in the urban setting, including markers of general health, mental health and also aspects of social contact. It may be, however, that social networks are more difficult to maintain in rural settings, and clinicians should be aware of the negative effect of perceived social isolation on pain in rural areas
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