56 research outputs found

    Reasons recorded for presentation at the health centre during the first year of life for a cohort of 320 children born from 1 Jan 2001–31 Dec 2006 and living in one of five remote Aboriginal communities in East Arnhem land.

    No full text
    <p>̂The proportion of children presenting for a specified reason is equivalent to the cumulative incidence of that condition/reason during the first year of life.</p>*<p>IQR = Interquartile range.</p>†<p>Median number of presentations per child, per condition in the first year of life.</p>#<p>% of children with coded as having the same reason for presentation (recurrence) in the first year of life.</p

    Median age at first clinic presentation for URTI, LRTI, scabies, skin sores, diarrhoea and ear disease in 5 remote communities in Northern Territory, Jan 01–Jan07.

    No full text
    <p>Median age at first clinic presentation for URTI, LRTI, scabies, skin sores, diarrhoea and ear disease in 5 remote communities in Northern Territory, Jan 01–Jan07.</p

    The relationship between the cumulative total of already discovered MelTs, and the probability that a MelT identified in any given calendar year will be not be novel.

    No full text
    <p>The line of best fit was calculated using a regression constrained to asymptote to a value ≤100%. Its formula is y = 88.4((exp(0.582√×−3.18)/(1+exp(0.582√×−3.18)).</p

    GoeBURST highlighting NT strains (red = MLST data; orange = MLST inferred from Minim typing and emmST).

    No full text
    <p>Grey circles or sectors are STs thus far identified only outside the NT. Clonal complexes with NT isolates in two or more STs are circled. Each spot in the GoeBURST diagram is labelled with an ST number. These may be visualised by zooming in.</p

    Hospital admissions for skin infections among Western Australian children and adolescents from 1996 to 2012

    No full text
    <div><p>The objective of this study was to describe the occurrence of skin infection associated hospitalizations in children born in Western Australia (WA). We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all children born in WA between 1996 and 2012 (n = 469,589). Of these, 31,348 (6.7%) were Aboriginal and 240,237 (51.2%) were boys. We report the annual age-specific hospital admission rates by geographical location and diagnostic category. We applied log-linear regression modelling to analyse changes in temporal trends of hospitalizations. Hospitalization rates for skin infections in Aboriginal children (31.7/1000 child-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 31.0–32.4) were 15.0 times higher (95% CI 14.5–15.5; P<0.001) than those of non-Aboriginal children (2.1/1000 child-years; 95% CI 2.0–2.1). Most admissions in Aboriginal children were due to abscess, cellulitis and scabies (84.3%), while impetigo and pyoderma were the predominant causes in non-Aboriginal children (97.7%). Admissions declined with age, with the highest rates for all skin infections observed in infants. Admissions increased with remoteness. Multiple admissions were more common in Aboriginal children. Excess admissions in Aboriginal children were observed during the wet season in the Kimberley and during summer in metropolitan areas. Our study findings show that skin infections are a significant cause of severe disease, requiring hospitalization in Western Australian children, with Aboriginal children at a particularly high risk. Improved community-level prevention of skin infections and the provision of effective primary care are crucial in reducing the burden of skin infection associated hospitalizations. The contribution of sociodemographic and environmental risk factors warrant further investigation.</p></div

    Hospital admissions for skin infections<sup>*</sup> in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children born in WA between 1996–2012, by age and WA region of residence.

    No full text
    <p>Hospital admissions for skin infections<sup><a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0188803#t004fn004" target="_blank">*</a></sup> in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children born in WA between 1996–2012, by age and WA region of residence.</p

    Number and rate of hospital admissions for skin infections<sup>a</sup> in WA-born Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children aged <16 years, by region, 1996–2012.

    No full text
    <p>Number and rate of hospital admissions for skin infections<a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0188803#t003fn001" target="_blank"><sup>a</sup></a> in WA-born Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children aged <16 years, by region, 1996–2012.</p
    corecore