19 research outputs found

    Superhydrophobic Particles Derived from Nature-Inspired Polyphenol Chemistry for Liquid Marble Formation and Oil Spills Treatment

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    Nature has given us great inspirations to fabricate high-performance materials with extremely exquisite structures. Presently, particles with a superhydrophobic surface are prepared through nature-inspired polyphenol chemistry. Briefly, adhering of a typical polyphenol (tannic acid, widely existed in tea, red wine, chocolate, <i>etc</i>.) is first conducted on titania particles to form a multifunctional coating, which is further in charge of reducing Ag<sup>+</sup> into Ag nanoparticles/nanoclusters (NPs/NCs) and responsible for grafting 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol, thus forming a lotus-leaf-mimic surface structure. The chemical/topological structure and superhydrophobic property of the as-engineered surface are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), water contact angle measurements, and so on. On the basis of the hierarchical, superhydrophobic surface, the particles exhibit a fascinating capability to form liquid marble and show some possibility in the application of oil removal from water. After particles are <i>in situ</i> adhered onto melamine sponges, the acquired particle-functionalized sponge exhibits an absorption capacity of 73–175 times of its own weight for a series of oils/organic solvents and shows superior ease of recyclability, suggesting an impressive capability for treating oil spills

    Superhydrophobic Particles Derived from Nature-Inspired Polyphenol Chemistry for Liquid Marble Formation and Oil Spills Treatment

    No full text
    Nature has given us great inspirations to fabricate high-performance materials with extremely exquisite structures. Presently, particles with a superhydrophobic surface are prepared through nature-inspired polyphenol chemistry. Briefly, adhering of a typical polyphenol (tannic acid, widely existed in tea, red wine, chocolate, <i>etc</i>.) is first conducted on titania particles to form a multifunctional coating, which is further in charge of reducing Ag<sup>+</sup> into Ag nanoparticles/nanoclusters (NPs/NCs) and responsible for grafting 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol, thus forming a lotus-leaf-mimic surface structure. The chemical/topological structure and superhydrophobic property of the as-engineered surface are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), water contact angle measurements, and so on. On the basis of the hierarchical, superhydrophobic surface, the particles exhibit a fascinating capability to form liquid marble and show some possibility in the application of oil removal from water. After particles are <i>in situ</i> adhered onto melamine sponges, the acquired particle-functionalized sponge exhibits an absorption capacity of 73–175 times of its own weight for a series of oils/organic solvents and shows superior ease of recyclability, suggesting an impressive capability for treating oil spills

    Fabrication of a Superhydrophobic, Fire-Resistant, and Mechanical Robust Sponge upon Polyphenol Chemistry for Efficiently Absorbing Oils/Organic Solvents

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    In this study, a superhydrophobic, fire-resistant, and mechanical robust sponge was fabricated through a two-step polyphenol chemistry strategy for efficiently absorbing oils/organic solvents (<i>rapidness in absorption rate and large quantity in absorption capacity</i>). Specifically, the Fe<sup>(III)</sup>–polyphenol complex is formed upon the metal–organic coordination between tannic acid (TA, a typical polyphenol) and Fe<sup>(III)</sup> ions, which is spontaneously coated on the surface of the pristine melamine sponge. Then, free catechol groups in the polyphenol are applied for grafting 1-dodecanethiol, thus generating the superhydrophobic sponge. Several characterizations have confirmed the chemical/topological structures, superhydrophobicity, fire-resistant merits, and mechanical robust property of the sponge. As a result, this sponge exhibits excellent absorption capacities of oils/organic solvents up to 69–176 times its own weight, indicating promising sorbents for removing oily pollutants from water. Meanwhile, owing to the facile fabrication process and inexpensive/easy available raw materials, the large-scale production of this sponge will be convenient and cost-effective

    Facile Method To Prepare Microcapsules Inspired by Polyphenol Chemistry for Efficient Enzyme Immobilization

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    In this study, a method inspired by polyphenol chemistry is developed for the facile preparation of microcapsules under mild conditions. Specifically, the preparation process includes four steps: formation of the sacrificial template, generation of the polyphenol coating on the template surface, cross-linking of the polyphenol coating by cationic polymers, and removal of the template. Tannic acid (TA) is chosen as a representative polyphenol coating precursor for the preparation of microcapsules. The strong interfacial affinity of TA contributes to the formation of polyphenol coating through oxidative oligomerization, while the high reactivity of TA is in charge of reacting/cross-linking with cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) through Schiff base/Michael addition reaction. The chemical/topological structures of the resultant microcapsules are simultaneously characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), <i>etc.</i> The wall thickness of the microcapsules could be tailored from 257 ± 20 nm to 486 ± 46 nm through changing the TA concentration. The microcapsules are then utilized for encapsulating glucose oxidase (GOD), and the immobilized enzyme exhibits desired catalytic activity and enhanced pH and thermal stabilities. Owing to the structural diversity and functional versatility of polyphenols, this study may offer a facile and generic method to prepare microcapsules and other kinds of functional porous materials

    Combination of Redox Assembly and Biomimetic Mineralization To Prepare Graphene-Based Composite Cellular Foams for Versatile Catalysis

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    Graphene-based materials with hierarchical structures and multifunctionality have gained much interest in a variety of applications. Herein, we report a facile, yet universal approach to prepare graphene-based composite cellular foams (GCCFs) through combination of redox assembly and biomimetic mineralization enabled by cationic polymers. Specifically, cationic polymers (e.g., polyethyleneimine, lysozyme, etc.) could not only reduce and simultaneously assemble graphene oxide (GO) into cellular foams but also confer the cellular foams with mineralization-inducing capability, enabling the formation of inorganic nanoparticles (e.g., silica, titania, silver, etc.). The GCCFs show highly porous structure and appropriate structural stability, where nanoparticles are well distributed on the surface of the reduced GO. Through altering polymer/inorganic pairs, a series of GCCFs are synthesized, which exhibit much enhanced catalytic performance in enzyme catalysis, heterogeneous chemical catalysis, and photocatalysis compared to nanoparticulate catalysts
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