29 research outputs found

    The Physical Tourist: Geneva: From the Science of the Enlightenment to CERN

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    John Calvin (1509-1564) founded a College and Academy in Geneva in 1559, the latter of which, through the efforts of many of its scholars, was finally declared to be a genuine university, the University of Geneva, in 1872. Meanwhile, thanks to the outstanding achievements of the rich, patrician Genevan scientists, in particular during the 18th century, Geneva secured a prominent place in European learned society. With the appointment of Charles-Eugène Guye (1866-1942) to the University of Geneva in 1900, Genevan research entered resolutely into 20th-century physics, particularly relativity, and continued to gain momentum before and after the Second World War when, in 1953, Geneva was chosen as the site of one of the most prestigious scientific laboratories in the world, CERN. I sketch these developments, pointing out many of the locations where they occurred in Genev

    Rougier et la physique

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    Series expansions without diagrams

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    We discuss the use of recursive enumeration schemes to obtain low and high temperature series expansions for discrete statistical systems. Using linear combinations of generalized helical lattices, the method is competitive with diagramatic approaches and is easily generalizable. We illustrate the approach using the Ising model and generate low temperature series in up to five dimensions and high temperature series in three dimensions. The method is general and can be applied to any discrete model. We describe how it would work for Potts models.Comment: 24 pages, IASSNS-HEP-93/1

    Low temperature expansion for the 3-d Ising Model

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    We compute the weak coupling expansion for the energy of the three dimensional Ising model through 48 excited bonds. We also compute the magnetization through 40 excited bonds. This was achieved via a recursive enumeration of states of fixed energy on a set of finite lattices. We use a linear combination of lattices with a generalization of helical boundary conditions to eliminate finite volume effects.Comment: 10 pages, IASSNS-HEP-92/42, BNL-4767

    Low Temperature Expansions for Potts Models

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    On simple cubic lattices, we compute low temperature series expansions for the energy, magnetization and susceptibility of the three-state Potts model in D=2 and D=3 to 45 and 39 excited bonds respectively, and the eight-state Potts model in D=2 to 25 excited bonds. We use a recursive procedure which enumerates states explicitly. We analyze the series using Dlog Pade analysis and inhomogeneous differential approximants.Comment: (17 pages + 8 figures

    Open Problems in (Hyper)Graph Decomposition

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    Large networks are useful in a wide range of applications. Sometimes problem instances are composed of billions of entities. Decomposing and analyzing these structures helps us gain new insights about our surroundings. Even if the final application concerns a different problem (such as traversal, finding paths, trees, and flows), decomposing large graphs is often an important subproblem for complexity reduction or parallelization. This report is a summary of discussions that happened at Dagstuhl seminar 23331 on "Recent Trends in Graph Decomposition" and presents currently open problems and future directions in the area of (hyper)graph decomposition

    The Physical Tourist. Geneva: From the Science of the Enlightenment to CERN

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    John Calvin (1509–1564) founded a College and Academy in Geneva in 1559, the latter of which, through the efforts of many of its scholars, was finally declared to be a genuine university, the University of Geneva, in 1872. Meanwhile, thanks to the outstanding achievements of the rich, patrician Genevan scientists, in particular during the 18th century, Geneva secured a prominent place in European learned society. With the appointment of Charles-Eugène Guye (1866–1942) to the University of Geneva in 1900, Genevan research entered resolutely into 20th-century physics, particularly relativity, and continued to gain momentum before and after the Second World War when, in 1953, Geneva was chosen as the site of one of the most prestigious scientific laboratories in the world, CERN. I sketch these developments, pointing out many of the locations where they occurred in Geneva

    Rougier et la physique

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