267 research outputs found

    Still vacant after all these years – Evaluating the efficiency of property-led urban regeneration

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    The author(s) received no financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.Peer reviewedPostprin

    Four Scottish indulgences at Sens

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    English interest in the great Cistercian abbey of Pontigny was stimulated by the exiles there of two archbishops of Canterbury, Thomas Becket and Stephen Langton.1 As archbishops of Canterbury, Langton and Edmund of Abingdon made gifts to Pontigny abbey in consideration of the welcome given to Becket.2 Edmund did not die at Pontigny, but was a confrater of the community, and the abbot claimed the body, asserting that Edmund had expressed a wish to be buried there. The process of canonisation was rapid.3 After Edmund's canonisation, Henry III sent a chasuble and a chalice for the first celebration of the feast, and granted money to maintain four candles round the saint's shrine.4 In 1254, en route from Gascony to meet Louis IX in Chartres and Paris,5 Henry visited Pontigny, as his brother Richard of Cornwall, who seems to have pressed for canonisation, had done in 1247.6 Archbishop Boniface of Canterbury ordered the celebration of the feast to be observed throughout his province.7 Pope Alexander IV granted a dispensation to allow Englishwomen to enter the precinct of Pontigny abbey on the feast of the translation of the relics of St Edmund8 (women were normally forbidden to enter a Cistercian monastery). Matthew Paris, the greatest English chronicler of the age, wrote a life of the saint.9 English interest continued into the fourteenth century. In 1331 an English priest was given a licence to visit the shrine,10 but it seems likely that the Hundred Years’ War made pilgrimage to Pontigny difficult.11 The indulgences preserved by the abbey reveal an interest in the shrine throughout the Western Church, granted as they were by prelates from Tortosa to Livonia and Estonia, and from Messina to Lübeck.1

    Senior housing in Scotland : a development and investment opportunity?

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    Funding Information: Under the Housing (Scotland) Act 2001, local authorities are required to prepare and submit a Local Housing Strategy (LHS) which is supported by an assessment of housing need and demand and subject to consultation and engagement with communities. The government had set a target of 50,000 affordable homes to be built by March 2021. This need is now unlikely to be met as a consequence of COVID-19. Funding for these homes comes from the Affordable Housing Supply Programme. Local authorities use their 3-years Resource Planning Assumption (RPA) from the Scottish Government to prepare Strategic Housing Investment plans (SHIPs) for their areas. These plans are the key documents for identifying strategic housing projects to assist the achievement of the 50,000 homes target. Currently, it does not appear that there is any policy obligation to build a set amount of senior homes per annum. It is up to local authorities to define need based on the demographics of their area. Acknowledgements: The authors express their thanks to the Elderly Accommodation Counsel for their assistance throughout this project and to Caroline Laurenson for her help on technology advancements. Publisher Copyright: © 2020, Emerald Publishing Limited. Copyright: Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.Peer reviewedPostprin

    Student residences: Time for a partnership approach?

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    Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the large number of participants in this research for their contribution. Among others these include university secretaries and estate directors, QMPF, Real Capital Analytics, Barclays, Bank of Ireland, Unite, Student Roost, GSA, Sanctuary Housing and Campus Life.Peer reviewedPostprin

    The role of the state in encouraging the supply of senior housing : a looming welfare crisis?

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    Acknowledgement: The authors would like to express their thanks to all those who assisted with this research.Peer reviewedPostprin

    The role of UK universities as economic drivers in a localisation agenda : A case study of City Deals.

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    Open Access via the Elsevier agreementPeer reviewedPublisher PD

    Floods in Nebraska on Small Drainage Areas Magnitude and Frequency

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    Flood hazard information is needed for small streams as well as for large ones. This report explains methods of defining the magnitude and frequency of floods in Nebraska on uncontrolled and unregulated streams which have about 300 square miles or less of drainage area contributing to surface runoff. Composite frequency curves defined for two flood regions express a ratio of floods with recurrence intervals ranging from 1.1 to 25 years to the mean annual flood. Curves for 10 hydrologic areas were defined to show the relation of the mean annual flood to the contributing drainage area. A flood-frequency curve can be drawn from these two sets of curves for any site in the State within the range of drainage area and recurrence interval that is defined by the base data and not materially affected by the works of man. The two sets of curves are based on all available pertinent data from records of 5 or more years\u27 duration. This report includes a tabulation of maximum flood peaks at gaging stations used and at a number of miscellaneous sites which have less than 300 square miles of contributing drainage area
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