440 research outputs found

    Regional Caddisfly (Trichoptera) Indicator Species for Mid-Order Michigan and Minnesota Streams

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    Nearly 150,000 caddisfly specimens representing 238 species were analyzed from 166 5–15m wide streams within Michigan and Minnesota to deter- mine the characteristic indicator species of 5 previously-established regions of caddisfly biological diversity. Based on a combination of relative frequency and abundance, 35 of these species indicated a particular region or regions. Indicator species in forested regions constituted a balance of trophic functional groups, whereas indicator species from agricultural regions were dominated by filtering collectors. While it was difficult to determine if species were indicating natural habitat type or differences in anthropogenic disturbance, establishing indicator species now will render potential future changes to the fauna easier to evaluate

    Updated Conservation Status of Protected Minnesota Caddisflies

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    Seven of the 13 Minnesota Trichoptera species with official protected status were located in the state during 1997-2001, including four species – Agapetus tomus, Asynarchus rossi, Hydroptila novicola, and Polycentropus milaca – not collected in nearly 40 years. Three species – Chilostigma itascae, Oxyethira ecornuta, and Polycentropus milaca – appear rare in Minnesota, two – Agapetus tomus and Asynarchus rossi – appear rare but locally abundant, and two – Hydroptila novicola and Oxyethira itascae – were found throughout northern Minnesota suggesting that they are more abundant than previously thought. Five listed species were not collected during this study and are currently of unknown conservation status. One listed species, Setodes guttatus, almost certainly does not occur in Minnesota and should be delisted

    Demonstration of Sex Pheromones in \u3ci\u3eMolanna Uniophila\u3c/i\u3e (Trichoptera: Molannidae), \u3ci\u3ePlatycentropus Radiatus, Pycnopsyche Indiana, and P. Subfasciata\u3c/i\u3e (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae), With an Assessment of Interspecific Attraction Between Four Sympatric \u3ci\u3ePycnopsyche\u3c/i\u3e Species

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    Evidence for sex pheromones in the caddisflies Molanna uniophila Vorhies, Platycentropus radiatus (Say), Pycnopsyche indiana (Ross), and P. subfasciata (Say) is presented here for the first time based on field studies conducted in southern Michigan. For all species, numbers of males caught in pheromone traps baited with conspecific female extracts were higher than those caught in traps with male extracts, or those without extract. Four sympatric species of Pycnopsyche: P. guttifer (Walker), P. indiana, P. lepida (Hagen), and P. subfasciata exhibited no interspecific pheromonal attraction despite a common mating season and, in the case of P. indiana and P. lepida, very similar genitalic morphology. Our results suggest the importance of pheromones in maintaining reproductive isolation between closely related species. Likewise, pheromone biology can help delineate morphologically cryptic species

    Validation of CTmax Protocols Using Cased and Uncased \u3ci\u3ePycnopsyche Guttifer\u3c/i\u3e (Trichoptera: Limnephilidae) Larvae

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    The critical thermal maximum (CTmax) of a northern Lower Michigan population of Pycnopsyche guttifer was determined using four rates of temperature increase (0.10, 0.33, 0.50, and 0.70oC per minute), and two case states (intact and removed). Across all temperature increase rates, larvae removed from their cases had a significantly lower mean CTmax than those remaining in their cases, suggesting that the case can increase the larva’s ability to tolerate thermal stress, possibly due to respiratory advantages. Regardless of case state, mean CTmax was significantly lower at the 0.10oC per minute increase rate than the other three rates, likely due to increased exposure time. Our results indicate that CTmax studies done using 0.33–0.70oC per minute increase protocols would be comparable with each other, but not with studies using an increase rate of 0.10oC per minute

    Analysis of the Caddisflies (Trichoptera) of the Manistee River Watershed, Michigan

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    We document 134 caddisfly species and their seasonal and habitat affinities based on 93 samples collected from 26 sites throughout the Manistee River watershed in the lower peninsula of Michigan from May through September, 2010. Eleven of these species: Banksiola dossuaria (Say), Cheumatopsyche aphanta Ross, Cheumatopsyche pasella Ross, Hydroptila xera Ross, Ironoquia lyrata (Ross), Lepidostoma vernale (Banks), Neotrichia vibrans Ross, Nyctiophylax affinis (Banks), Oxyethira aeola Ross, Oxyethira rivicola Blickle and Morse, and Polycentropus timesis (Denning) are reported from Michigan for the first time. More than 85% of species reached peak adult abundance during June or July, although a few species reached peak abundance or emerged exclusively during the other months. Overall species richness reached its peak during early July, with a smaller peak of unique species in September. Caddisfly faunas in lakes, small streams, medium rivers, and large rivers were all distinct from each other, suggesting that the overall watershed is following patterns predicted by the River Continuum Concept. It is likely that the Michigan caddisfly fauna contains considerably more species than what is currently known

    Abnormal Perceptual Sensitivity in Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors

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    Objective Several compulsive grooming habits such as hair pulling, skin picking, and nail biting are collectively known as body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs). Although subclinical BFRBs are common and benign, more severe and damaging manifestations exist that are difficult to manage. Researchers have suggested that BFRBs are maintained by various cognitive, affective, and sensory contingencies. Although the involvement of cognitive and affective processes in BFRBs has been studied, there is a paucity of research on sensory processes. Methods The current study tested whether adults with subclinical or clinical BFRBs would report abnormal patterns of sensory processing as compared to a healthy control sample. Results Adults with clinical BFRBs (n = 26) reported increased sensory sensitivity as compared to persons with subclinical BFRBs (n = 48) and healthy individuals (n = 33). Elevations in sensation avoidance differentiated persons with clinical versus subclinical BFRBs. Sensation seeking patterns were not different between groups. Unexpectedly, BFRB severity was associated with lower registration of sensory stimuli, but this finding may be due to high psychiatric comorbidity rates in the BFRB groups. Conclusions These findings suggest that several sensory abnormalities may underlie BFRBs. Implications for the etiology and treatment of BFRBs are discussed

    Updated Conservation Status of Protected Minnesota Caddisflies

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    Seven of the 13 Minnesota Trichoptera species with official protected status were located in the state during 1997-2001, including four species – Agapetus tomus, Asynarchus rossi, Hydroptila novicola, and Polycentropus milaca – not collected in nearly 40 years. Three species – Chilostigma itascae, Oxyethira ecornuta, and Polycentropus milaca – appear rare in Minnesota, two – Agapetus tomus and Asynarchus rossi – appear rare but locally abundant, and two – Hydroptila novicola and Oxyethira itascae – were found throughout northern Minnesota suggesting that they are more abundant than previously thought. Five listed species were not collected during this study and are currently of unknown conservation status. One listed species, Setodes guttatus, almost certainly does not occur in Minnesota and should be delisted
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