20 research outputs found

    Archaeological Investigations at Moody Reunion and Fairgrounds, Floresville, Wilson County, Texas

    Get PDF
    Archaeologists from the Center for Archaeological Studies (CAS) at Texas State University conducted an intensive pedestrian survey including the excavation of 5 mechanical trenches and 50 shovel tests in Moody Reunion and Fairgrounds, Floresville, Texas, from January 10 through February 23, 2018. The survey was executed in order to assess the project area for potential impacts to cultural resources in advance of the installation of a new baseball complex and associated infrastructure by the City of Floresville. Work was carried out by CAS archaeologists Jacob Hooge and David Macias under Texas Antiquities Permit Number 8276, assigned to Principal Investigator Jacob Hooge. The area of potential effects (APE) includes Floresville River Park, Kiddie Park, and an area extending approximately 1,400 meters northwest of the Floresville Events Center. Other than modern refuse, only one single prehistoric stone tool was observed in a secondary context within a gully near the San Antonio River. The source of the tool could not be identified leading to its classification as an isolated find, and thus, holds little research value, and are not significant to the city’s, state’s or nation’s history. Although soil profiles observed in trenches and a natural erosion feature exhibit potential for buried archaeology, no other prehistoric or historic cultural materials were observed during survey. Accordingly, CAS recommends full regulatory clearance for the installations of all of the proposed features

    Archaeological Investigations for FEMA Phase I Master Plan Drainage Improvements, City of Buda, Hays County, Texas

    Get PDF
    Archaeologists from the Center for Archaeological Studies (CAS) at Texas State University conducted an intensive pedestrian survey including the excavation of 1 mechanical trench and 13 shovel tests along a proposed drainage easement northwest and west-southwest of FM 2770 (also known as Jack C. Hays Trail) in Buda, Texas, from May 14‚Äď15, 2018. The survey was executed in order to assess the project area for potential impacts to cultural resources in advance of the installation of a proposed new outfall channel and culvert under FM 2770 in order to divert excess flow from the unnamed tributary of Onion Creek in the City of Buda. Work was carried out by CAS archaeologists Jodi Jacobson and Victoria Pagano under Texas Antiquities Permit Number 8407, assigned to Principal Investigator Jacob Hooge. The area of potential effects (APE) includes a narrow drainage easement no more than 1,600 linear feet, a construction easement width not to exceed 180 feet, with depths not likely to exceed 14.5 feet for a total project acreage of 6.7 acres The project area extends approximately 400 linear feet northwest of FM 2770 and approximetely1,100 linear feet east-southeast. While planned for city acquisition, the property was privately owned and undeveloped at the time of survey. During survey a total of four positive shovel tests with non-diagnostic lithic flakes were encountered, two of which also contained clear bottle glass. Flakes were limited to the upper 70 centimeters (cm) of one of the positive shovel tests and limited to the upper 50 cm of the remaining three. The bottle glass was identified mixed within and even at levels below the flakes in two of the tests with presence depths of historic context not exceeding 50 cm, with an additional surficial scattering of some 20th century mixed with modern mostly surficial trash debris. Given the disturbance, all prehistoric deposits within the project area would be lacking in integrity. CAS recommends that site 41HY548 within the project boundaries would be ineligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places due to lack of integrity of association, setting, or material based on the mixed nature of the deposits, as well as a lack to provide new or additional information. CAS recommends full regulatory clearance for the proposed project

    Annual Report to Texas State University, San Marcos, Hays County, Texas, for Texas Antiquities Permit No. 6775

    Get PDF
    The Center for Archaeological Studies (CAS) at Texas State University (University) conducted archaeological investigations for eight proposed undertakings on property owned by the University under Texas Antiquities Permit No. 6775 during the year 2014. Investigations were conducted to determine if intact cultural resources were present within the project areas and if they would be adversely affected by construction and development. Under a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Texas Historical Commission (THC) and the University, CAS is authorized to determine whether proposed undertakings have the potential to negatively impact cultural resources, and if so, to recommend to the University courses of future action that may avoid or offset that impact. As a result of archaeological monitoring, one previously unrecorded archaeological site, 41HY518, was documented. The boundaries of sites 41HY447 and 41HY37 have been revised to include associated deposits identified during archaeological investigations. No intact, significant cultural deposits were encountered or impacted during the University undertakings of 2014. Accordingly, CAS recommends that no additional investigations are warranted. CAS continues to recommend that the University avoid adversely impacting SALs 41HY160 and 41HY161, as well as sites 41HY37 and 41HY447. If avoidance of intact features and deposits of these sites is not possible, then additional work is recommended to offset the potential loss of information

    Results of Archaeological Monitoring of the Spring Lake Section 206 Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Project, Texas State University-San Marcos, Hays County, Texas

    Get PDF
    The Center for Archaeological Studies (CAS) at Texas State University-San Marcos conducted archaeological monitoring investigations in association with the Spring Lake Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Project between October 2011 and July 2012. These archaeological monitoring investigations were the result of mitigation efforts proposed in the Historic Properties Treatment Plan drafted in accordance to the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) signed and enacted between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Texas State University-San Marcos, and the Texas Historical Commission. Archaeological monitoring investigations consisted of monitoring all demolition and ground-disturbing activities conducted during the course of the Spring Lake Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Project. All cultural deposits or potential cultural deposits were identified, assessed, and documented during the project by archaeological monitors, and time-diagnostic artifacts were collected. Locations of deposits were recorded and uploaded to a GIS database of the Spring Lake area for future reference. No significant cultural remains were identified or impacted by demolition and ground-disturbing activities of the Spring Lake Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Project

    Zr-89-Lumretuzumab PET Imaging before and during HER3 Antibody Lumretuzumab Treatment in Patients with Solid Tumors

    No full text
    Purpose: We evaluated biodistribution and tumor targeting of Zr-89-lumretuzumab before and during treatment with lumretuzumab, a human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3)targeting monoclonal antibody. Experimental Design: Twenty patients with histologically confirmed HER3-expressing tumors received Zr-89-lumretuzumab and underwent positron emission tomography (PET). In part A, (89)-Zr-lumretuzumab was given with additional, escalating doses of unlabeled lumretuzumab, and scans were performed 2, 4, and 7 days after injection to determine optimal imaging conditions. In part B, patients were scanned following tracer injection before (baseline) and after a pharmacodynamic (PD)-active lumretuzumab dose for saturation analysis. HER3 expression was determined immunohistochemically in skin biopsies. Tracer uptake was calculated as standardized uptake value (SUV). Results: Optimal PET conditions were found to be 4 and 7 days after administration of Zr-89-lumretuzumab with 100-mg unlabeled lumretuzumab. At baseline using 100-mg unlabeled lumretuzumab, the tumor SUVmax was 3.4(+/- 1.9) at 4 days after injection. SUVmean values for normal blood, liver, lung, and brain tissues were 4.9, 6.4, 0.9 and 0.2, respectively. Saturation analysis (n = 7) showed that 4 days after lumretuzumab administration, tumor uptake decreased by 11.9% (+/- 8.2), 10.0% (+/- 16.5), and 24.6% (+/- 20.9) at PD-active doses of 400, 800, and 1,600 mg, respectively, when compared with baseline. Membranous HER3 was completely downregulated in paired skin biopsies already at and above 400-mg lumretuzumab. Conclusions: PET imaging showed biodistribution and tumor-specific Zr-89-lumretuzumab uptake. Although, PD-active lumretuzumab doses decreased Zr-89-lumretuzumab uptake, there was no clear evidence of tumor saturation by PET imaging as the tumor SUV did not plateau with increasing doses. (C) 2017 AACR
    corecore