204 research outputs found

    Updated Conservation Status of Protected Minnesota Caddisflies

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    Seven of the 13 Minnesota Trichoptera species with official protected status were located in the state during 1997-2001, including four species – Agapetus tomus, Asynarchus rossi, Hydroptila novicola, and Polycentropus milaca – not collected in nearly 40 years. Three species – Chilostigma itascae, Oxyethira ecornuta, and Polycentropus milaca – appear rare in Minnesota, two – Agapetus tomus and Asynarchus rossi – appear rare but locally abundant, and two – Hydroptila novicola and Oxyethira itascae – were found throughout northern Minnesota suggesting that they are more abundant than previously thought. Five listed species were not collected during this study and are currently of unknown conservation status. One listed species, Setodes guttatus, almost certainly does not occur in Minnesota and should be delisted

    Updated Conservation Status of Protected Minnesota Caddisflies

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    Seven of the 13 Minnesota Trichoptera species with official protected status were located in the state during 1997-2001, including four species – Agapetus tomus, Asynarchus rossi, Hydroptila novicola, and Polycentropus milaca – not collected in nearly 40 years. Three species – Chilostigma itascae, Oxyethira ecornuta, and Polycentropus milaca – appear rare in Minnesota, two – Agapetus tomus and Asynarchus rossi – appear rare but locally abundant, and two – Hydroptila novicola and Oxyethira itascae – were found throughout northern Minnesota suggesting that they are more abundant than previously thought. Five listed species were not collected during this study and are currently of unknown conservation status. One listed species, Setodes guttatus, almost certainly does not occur in Minnesota and should be delisted

    Revision of the northern South American species of \u3ci\u3eMortoniella\u3c/i\u3e Ulmer, 1906 (Trichoptera: Glossosomatidae: Protoptilinae)*

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    Species of Mortoniella are revised for the northern and Andean part of the South American continent, including the countries of Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, and Guyana. All previously described species from the region are reillustrated and redescribed, except for Mortoniella santiaga Sykora, 1999 and M. quinuas Harper and Turcotte, 1985, whose types could not be located, and M. tranquilla Martynov, 1912, whose type is based on a female specimen and thus is currently unidentifiable. Included in the revision are 35 described species and 59 new species. Mortoniella similis Sykora, 1999 is considered a junior synonym of M. roldani Flint, 1991, and M. macuta (Botosaneanu, 1998) is considered a junior synonym of M. limona (Flint, 1981). A new subgenus, Nanotrichia, is recognized to accommodate species previously referred to as members of the ormina and velasquezi groups. Mexitrichia pacuara Flint, 1974 is designated the type species for the subgenus. Species previously referred to as members of the bilineata and leroda species groups are retained in the nominate subgenus, along with additional taxa not previously placed to species group, and treated within a number of subgroups. Previously described species of M. (Mortoniella) which are redescribed and reillustrated include: M. angulata Flint, 1963; M. apiculata Flint, 1963; M. atenuata (Flint, 1963); M. bifurcata Sykora, 1999; M. bilineata Ulmer, 1906; M. bolivica (Schmid, 1958); M. chicana Sykora, 1999; M. denticulata Sykora, 1999; M. elongata (Flint, 1963); M. enchrysa Flint, 1991; M. flinti Sykora, 1999; M. foersteri (Schmid, 1964); M. hodgesi Flint, 1963; M. iridescens Flint, 1991; M. leei (Flint, 1974); M. limona (Flint, 1981); M. marini (Rueda MartĂ­n and Gibon, 2008); M. paralineata Sykora, 1999; M. paraenchrysa Sykora, 1999; M. pocita (Flint, 1983); M. punensis (Flint, 1983); M. roldani Flint, 1991; M. simla (Flint, 1974); M. spinulata (Flint, 1991); M. squamata Sykora, 1999; M. unilineata Sykora, 1999; and M. wygodzinskii (Schmid, 1958). New species described in M. (Mortoniella), followed by their respective areas of distribution, include: M. acutiterga (Ecuador); M. adamsae (Peru); M. akrogeneios (Ecuador); M. applanata (Peru); M. auricularis (Colombia); M. barinasi (Venezuela); M. biramosa (Venezuela); M. bothrops (Peru); M. brevis (Ecuador, Venezuela); M. bulbosa (Peru); M. catherinae (Peru); M. chalalan (Peru); M. cornuta (Peru); M. cressae (Venezuela); M. croca (Peru); M. curtispina (Venezuela); M. curvistylus (Ecuador); M. dentiterga (Ecuador); M. dinotes (Peru); M. draconis (Ecuador); M. emarginata (Ecuador, Colombia); M. esrossi (Colombia); M. flexuosa (Colombia); M. furcula (Ecuador); M. gilli (Ecuador); M. gracilis (Venezuela); M. grandiloba (Venezuela); M. guyanensis (Guyana); M. hamata (Colombia); M. langleyae (Ecuador); M. longiterga (Ecuador); M. membranacea (Bolivia); M. monopodis (Colombia, Ecuador); M. parameralda (Ecuador); M. pica (Ecuador); M. proakantha (Ecuador); M. prolata (Peru); M. quadrispina (Ecuador); M. rectiflexa (Ecuador); M. ruedae (Bolivia); M. schlingeri (Colombia); M. silacea (Colombia, Ecuador); M. sinuosa (Bolivia, Peru); M. spatulata (Venezuela); M. tanyrhabdos (Venezuela); M. tridens (Peru); M. triramosa (Bolivia); M. tusci (Venezuela); and M. variabilis (Venezuela, Colombia). Species assigned to the subgenus M. (Nanotrichia) which are redescribed and reillustrated include: M. aequalis (Flint, 1963); M. aries (Flint, 1963); M. collegarum (Rueda MartĂ­n and Gibon, 2008); M. eduardoi (Rueda MartĂ­n and Gibon, 2008); M. macarenica (Flint, 1974); M. pacuara (Flint, 1974); M. usseglioi (Rueda MartĂ­n and Gibon, 2008); and M. velasquezi (Flint, 1991). Previously described species of Mortoniella, outside the area of coverage, that are transferred to the subgenus M. (Nanotrichia) include: M. alicula Blahnik and Holzenthal, 2011; M. bocaina Blahnik and Holzenthal, 2011; M. catarinensis (Flint, 1974); M. froehlichi Blahnik and Holzenthal, 2011; M. ormina (Mosely, 1939); M. rodmani Blahnik and Holzenthal, 2008; and M. tripuiensis Blahnik and Holzenthal, 2011. New species in the subgenus M. (Nanotrichia), followed by their respective areas of distribution, include: Mortoniella cognata (Ecuador, Venezuela); M. coheni (Ecuador); M. licina (Ecuador); M. paucispina (Peru); M. quadridactyla (Venezuela); M. simplicis (Venezuela); M. spangleri (Ecuador); M. triangularis (Ecuador); M. venezuelensis (Venezuela); and M. zamora (Ecuador). A key to the males of species from the region is also provided, as well as a key to females for the major subgroups and a species key to females of the velasquezi group. Finally, a partially resolved phylogeny of the species is presented, along with a discussion of evolutionary trends within the genus

    Erratum to Blahnik and Holzenthal (2017): Revision of the northern South American species of \u3ci\u3eMortoniella\u3c/i\u3e Ulmer, 1906 (Trichoptera: Glossosomatidae: Protoptilinae)

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    After publication of Blahnik and Holzenthal (2017), it was noticed that a large portion of the text had been accidentally removed from the “Phylogenetic and evolutionary comments” section during the proofing stage. The beginning of the deleted section completes the sentence on line 6 of page 129, which begins “The species included in the subgenus...”. The Insecta Mundi editorial staff apologizes for this oversight. In order to provide context for the deleted excerpt, the entire “Phylogenetic and evolutionary comments” section is reproduced here, with the deleted text reincorporated. Insecta Mundi has also released a revised version of the Blahnik and Holzenthal (2017) manuscript, with this error corrected. However, the revised version is merely for convenience, and not an official peerreviewed article. Anyone wishing to reference the findings of Blahnik and Holzenthal (2017) should cite the original 2017 manuscript or this erratum. The references and figure plates cited in this section have also been reproduced here

    Studies in Neotropical Leptoceridae (Trichoptera) II: Amphoropsyche, a new genus and species of Leptocerinae from northern South America.

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    Amphoropsyche, n. gen. (Trichoptera: Leptoceridae: Leptocerinae), from northern South America is described and illustrated. Nine new species are placed in the new genus: A. ayura, A. cauca, A. choco, A. fl inti, A. quebrada, and A. stellata from Colombia; A. napo from Ecuador; and A. aragua and A. refugia from Venezuela. B,rachysetodes insularis is transferred to the new genus. Amphoropsyche is diagnosed by the presence of a large internal gland in the preanal appendages and by a tuft of closely appressed setae on the inferior appendages of the male genitalia. Its phylogenetic position is near the base of the Leptocerinae

    Digital Illustration of Insects

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    Nomenclatural and systematic changes in the Neotropical caddisflies (Insecta: Trichoptera)

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    Recent work on a catalog of the Neotropical caddisflies has resulted in the recognition of the need to make numerous lectotype designations, new names for homonyms, specific and generic synonymies, transfers of species between genera and genera between families, and placement of many long ignored names of Muller and others

    Erratum to Blahnik and Holzenthal (2017): Revision of the northern South American species of \u3ci\u3eMortoniella\u3c/i\u3e Ulmer, 1906 (Trichoptera: Glossosomatidae: Protoptilinae)

    Get PDF
    After publication of Blahnik and Holzenthal (2017), it was noticed that a large portion of the text had been accidentally removed from the “Phylogenetic and evolutionary comments” section during the proofing stage. The beginning of the deleted section completes the sentence on line 6 of page 129, which begins “The species included in the subgenus...”. The Insecta Mundi editorial staff apologizes for this oversight. In order to provide context for the deleted excerpt, the entire “Phylogenetic and evolutionary comments” section is reproduced here, with the deleted text reincorporated. Insecta Mundi has also released a revised version of the Blahnik and Holzenthal (2017) manuscript, with this error corrected. However, the revised version is merely for convenience, and not an official peerreviewed article. Anyone wishing to reference the findings of Blahnik and Holzenthal (2017) should cite the original 2017 manuscript or this erratum. The references and figure plates cited in this section have also been reproduced here

    Revision of the northern South American species of \u3ci\u3eMortoniella\u3c/i\u3e Ulmer, 1906 (Trichoptera: Glossosomatidae: Protoptilinae)*

    Get PDF
    Species of Mortoniella are revised for the northern and Andean part of the South American continent, including the countries of Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, and Guyana. All previously described species from the region are reillustrated and redescribed, except for Mortoniella santiaga Sykora, 1999 and M. quinuas Harper and Turcotte, 1985, whose types could not be located, and M. tranquilla Martynov, 1912, whose type is based on a female specimen and thus is currently unidentifiable. Included in the revision are 35 described species and 59 new species. Mortoniella similis Sykora, 1999 is considered a junior synonym of M. roldani Flint, 1991, and M. macuta (Botosaneanu, 1998) is considered a junior synonym of M. limona (Flint, 1981). A new subgenus, Nanotrichia, is recognized to accommodate species previously referred to as members of the ormina and velasquezi groups. Mexitrichia pacuara Flint, 1974 is designated the type species for the subgenus. Species previously referred to as members of the bilineata and leroda species groups are retained in the nominate subgenus, along with additional taxa not previously placed to species group, and treated within a number of subgroups. Previously described species of M. (Mortoniella) which are redescribed and reillustrated include: M. angulata Flint, 1963; M. apiculata Flint, 1963; M. atenuata (Flint, 1963); M. bifurcata Sykora, 1999; M. bilineata Ulmer, 1906; M. bolivica (Schmid, 1958); M. chicana Sykora, 1999; M. denticulata Sykora, 1999; M. elongata (Flint, 1963); M. enchrysa Flint, 1991; M. flinti Sykora, 1999; M. foersteri (Schmid, 1964); M. hodgesi Flint, 1963; M. iridescens Flint, 1991; M. leei (Flint, 1974); M. limona (Flint, 1981); M. marini (Rueda MartĂ­n and Gibon, 2008); M. paralineata Sykora, 1999; M. paraenchrysa Sykora, 1999; M. pocita (Flint, 1983); M. punensis (Flint, 1983); M. roldani Flint, 1991; M. simla (Flint, 1974); M. spinulata (Flint, 1991); M. squamata Sykora, 1999; M. unilineata Sykora, 1999; and M. wygodzinskii (Schmid, 1958). New species described in M. (Mortoniella), followed by their respective areas of distribution, include: M. acutiterga (Ecuador); M. adamsae (Peru); M. akrogeneios (Ecuador); M. applanata (Peru); M. auricularis (Colombia); M. barinasi (Venezuela); M. biramosa (Venezuela); M. bothrops (Peru); M. brevis (Ecuador, Venezuela); M. bulbosa (Peru); M. catherinae (Peru); M. chalalan (Peru); M. cornuta (Peru); M. cressae (Venezuela); M. croca (Peru); M. curtispina (Venezuela); M. curvistylus (Ecuador); M. dentiterga (Ecuador); M. dinotes (Peru); M. draconis (Ecuador); M. emarginata (Ecuador, Colombia); M. esrossi (Colombia); M. flexuosa (Colombia); M. furcula (Ecuador); M. gilli (Ecuador); M. gracilis (Venezuela); M. grandiloba (Venezuela); M. guyanensis (Guyana); M. hamata (Colombia); M. langleyae (Ecuador); M. longiterga (Ecuador); M. membranacea (Bolivia); M. monopodis (Colombia, Ecuador); M. parameralda (Ecuador); M. pica (Ecuador); M. proakantha (Ecuador); M. prolata (Peru); M. quadrispina (Ecuador); M. rectiflexa (Ecuador); M. ruedae (Bolivia); M. schlingeri (Colombia); M. silacea (Colombia, Ecuador); M. sinuosa (Bolivia, Peru); M. spatulata (Venezuela); M. tanyrhabdos (Venezuela); M. tridens (Peru); M. triramosa (Bolivia); M. tusci (Venezuela); and M. variabilis (Venezuela, Colombia). Species assigned to the subgenus M. (Nanotrichia) which are redescribed and reillustrated include: M. aequalis (Flint, 1963); M. aries (Flint, 1963); M. collegarum (Rueda MartĂ­n and Gibon, 2008); M. eduardoi (Rueda MartĂ­n and Gibon, 2008); M. macarenica (Flint, 1974); M. pacuara (Flint, 1974); M. usseglioi (Rueda MartĂ­n and Gibon, 2008); and M. velasquezi (Flint, 1991). Previously described species of Mortoniella, outside the area of coverage, that are transferred to the subgenus M. (Nanotrichia) include: M. alicula Blahnik and Holzenthal, 2011; M. bocaina Blahnik and Holzenthal, 2011; M. catarinensis (Flint, 1974); M. froehlichi Blahnik and Holzenthal, 2011; M. ormina (Mosely, 1939); M. rodmani Blahnik and Holzenthal, 2008; and M. tripuiensis Blahnik and Holzenthal, 2011. New species in the subgenus M. (Nanotrichia), followed by their respective areas of distribution, include: Mortoniella cognata (Ecuador, Venezuela); M. coheni (Ecuador); M. licina (Ecuador); M. paucispina (Peru); M. quadridactyla (Venezuela); M. simplicis (Venezuela); M. spangleri (Ecuador); M. triangularis (Ecuador); M. venezuelensis (Venezuela); and M. zamora (Ecuador). A key to the males of species from the region is also provided, as well as a key to females for the major subgroups and a species key to females of the velasquezi group. Finally, a partially resolved phylogeny of the species is presented, along with a discussion of evolutionary trends within the genus

    A new species of Smicridea McLachlan (Trichoptera:Hydropsychidae) from Venezuela and its role in travertine biogenesis

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    We collected an undescribed hydropsychid caddisfly, Smicridea (Smicridea) travertinera, n. sp., from 2 sites in Venezuela. One of the sites, Quebrada El Charo, flowed over extensive calcareous formations of travertine, which were covered with retreats and capture nets of the new species. Smicridea travertinera was the most abundant aquatic insect colonizing travertine.We describe the adult male, the retreat and net, and gut contents. The retreat consisted of an aperture in the travertine with a capture net. Retreat-making behavior appears to cause both the biogenesis and erosion of the travertine formations
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