835 research outputs found

    Alien Registration- Holmes, Ruth E. (Mattawamkeag, Penobscot County)

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    https://digitalmaine.com/alien_docs/8271/thumbnail.jp

    Christina Morris: Micmac Artist and Artist's Model

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    Stimulation to Growth in Arithmetic

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    Comparative Adjectives in Cherokee

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    Men, Women, and Italians: The Masquerade of Narrative and Identity in Richardson\u27s \u3ci\u3eSir Charles Grandison\u3c/i\u3e

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    The chaotic masquerades that proliferated during the British long eighteenth century punctuated the period’s preoccupation with order and categorization. The identity categories that the masquerade disrupted, the novel reinforced, or perhaps even created. It was in the middle of this period, in the political center of Britain, that Samuel Richardson published his third and final novel, The History of Sir Charles Grandison (1753), a novel which centers England and was also centered by England, a national treasure entangled in literary and cultural history. Tracing the nexus of gender and nationalism in Grandison then becomes important given the novel’s active entanglement in the debates that birthed the modern individual and the “private” sphere. In part because of its historical positioning, Grandison serves as a catalog of the period’s identity debates. The dramatis personae divides characters into “men,” “women,” and “Italians,” but at the same time that the structure attempts to relegate characters to their respective narrative and social spaces, they resist, for the paratext provides framing that the narrative subverts. In the dramatis personae, characters dress for a masquerade; the text, however, rejects these superficial trimmings, stripping the characters, structure, and plot of their masks. The blurring between man and woman, Briton and Italian, realism and romance create crises of category, and so Grandison’s narrative uses disrupted generic modes and changeable character masks to imagine a stronger community not in spite of but due to the permeable boundaries of narrative, nation, gender, and even the human body itself. Literary conventions speak through the text, and in asserting arbitrary divisions remind us that boundaries in general are masquerades, that even genre itself simply apes order, protecting against the chaos that would unsettle what we believe about identity, community, and creation. The study of Grandison, a literary model for questioning binaries of all kinds, contributes to the field of cultural studies by providing a long scope of the identity debates which entangle the twenty-first century, and by suggesting that it is through the imaginative potential of fiction that we may begin to disentangle ourselves

    From one degree of imperfection to another: A consideration of gathering in different ways

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    This conversation between Ruth Gouldbourne and Steve Holmes, both ordained Baptist ministers, focuses on issues raised during the COVID-19 pandemic, and in particular the theological as well as practical questions around gathering for worship when gathering together in church buildings was not possible. Exploring a theology of ‘gathering’, they find themselves wanting to distinguish between ideal and ‘adequate’ ways of being church: the significance and different expressions of people seeing each other ‘face to face’, the experience of virtual gatherings around the Lord’s Table, and the anticipatory, provisional nature of any church expression. In this perspective, celebrating the Communion while being separated physically is not only possible, but an essential expression of the creative nature of a gathering community in continuation with the Church across the ages. They also note the communicative power carried by physical spaces and objects used in the life of the church, as well as all other nonverbal cues

    Third way and new liberalism: Responding to globalisation at the domestic/international frontier.

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    The self-identified intellectual currents known in Britain as New Liberalism and the Third Way can be seen as domestic political responses to two periods of 'globalisation' - understood here as a specific type of transformational change occasioned by simultaneous technological, economic, social and political shift. The resulting changes in perceptions of time, speed and distance alter political and popular understandings of relations between local, national and international, and between society, state and economy. It is also indicative of a shift in the development of the state; from the 'premodern' to the 'modern' in the first timeframe, and the 'modern' to a new stage that could be termed 'global' more recently. New Liberalism and the Third Way were both developed as elite-led, domestic, synthesising political philosophies in the face of an electoral threat brought about by societal change and external economic challenge. These examples suggest that the current globalisation debate is flawed as it treats as a single phenomenon different aspects of change and fails to recognise the implications of the similarities between these two periods. There is no suggestion that there are only two periods of change only that systemic change is qualitatively different. International Relations as an academic discipline is responding inadequately because of a reluctance to overcome the tendency to downplay links between domestic and international spheres and levels of state development. By comparing these specific periods of transformation and their political ideologies in the British context, this thesis will explore the relationship between international and domestic political ideology at times of such change and suggest that the result is a specific kind of transitional politics born of both innovation and necessity. Finally, while this kind of political engagement has been neglected by international relations, it may prove to be evidence of stages of development in the state

    The interpersonal needs of learning disabled children /

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    Electrographics

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    Thesis (M.S.V.S.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Architecture, 1980.Includes bibliographical references (p. 49-50).by Virginia Ruth Holmes.M.S.V.S
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