88 research outputs found

    THE FREQUENCY AND FUNCTIONS OF TEACHERS’ USE OF MOTHER TONGUE IN EFL CLASSROOMS

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    Whether mother tongue should be used in EFL classroom or not is a controversial issue and has not yet reached a consensus among teachers and researchers. While some argue that the use of mother tongue inhibits language learning, others claim that it saves time and energy for both language teachers and students and enhances mutual understanding between them. Although a number of studies explore the use of mother tongue in EFL classrooms, few have been conducted to investigate how often teachers in non-English major classes code-switch, that is, change from English to mother tongue and why they do that. In such a context, the current study examined the use of code-switching by teachers in EFL classroom in a medical college in Vietnam by means of classroom observations and voice recording analysis. The findings revealed that in teaching English to nursing students in this medical college, the teachers did code-switch to a great extent for the main purpose of enhancing their students’ English comprehension and competence. Suggestions are proposed to raise EFL teachers’ awareness on how and when to code-switch so that their teaching can be optimized.  Article visualizations

    THE IMPACTS OF IMPLEMENTING THE FLIPPED MODEL ON EFL HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ READING COMPREHENSION

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    The flipped classroom is gaining more attention than ever before due to the pandemic of the COVID-19, by which online learning becomes a must in many countries and territories all over the world. The flipped model is a combination of online and face-to-face learning in which students watch instructional videos and do certain comprehension tasks at home prior to in-class lessons. To our knowledge, few studies have been conducted to explore the impact of flipped classrooms for teaching English reading skills in the high school context. The current experimental study has been conducted in a high school in the Mekong Delta with 52 students at Grade 11 in a high school in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam. Students were assigned to watch videos of instructions for 6 reading lessons in the English Grade 11 Textbook for 10 weeks. Learners’ reading comprehension performance and attitudes are compared between the control group and the experimental group. The findings reveal some interesting implications for Vietnamese teachers teaching English at high school. Article visualizations

    THE IMPACT OF QUESTIONING AND SEMANTIC MAP IN PRE-READING STAGE ON STUDENTS' READING COMPREHENSION: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

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    Pre-reading activities play an important role in language reading classrooms since they help to activate students’ background knowledge of the topics being taught, which results in improving students’ reading comprehension. Most studies in the literature focus on exploring the effects of individual pre-reading activities such as brainstorming, pre-teaching vocabulary, questioning on students’ performance in doing comprehension tasks. Few studies have been conducted to explore whether one technique is better than the others in activating students’ schemata in reading lessons. The current study investigates the impact of Questioning and Semantic map in Pre-reading stage on EFL gifted high school students’ reading comprehension. The participants were 52 gifted students from two science classes for twelfth graders (they were non gifted English students). They shared the same culture, native language, educational background and age. The data were collected through two reading proficiency tests (pre-test and post-test) and individual interviews. The findings revealed that both Questioning and Semantic map had positive impacts on gifted students’ reading comprehension. Especially, the students who received Semantic treatment had significantly better improvement in their reading skill. The findings shed lights on what can be done to improve EFL students’ reading performance.  Article visualizations

    ONLINE LEARNING AND ITS POTENTIAL IN DEVELOPING EFL LEARNER AUTONOMY: ENGLISH-MAJORED STUDENTS' PERCEPTIONS

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    Learner autonomy is now regarded as a desirable goal in tertiary education as it is found to comply with learner-centered approaches and enable students to pursue life-long learning (Sinclair, 2000a; Ciekanski, 2007). In the time of COVID-19 pandemic, the essential to conduct in-depth investigations into leaner autotomy and online learning has become more urgent, especially in the context of a university in Vietnam. This quantitative research responded to such a pressing call by exploring two aspects: (1) the students’ perception of online learning, and (3) the potentiality of online learning for developing learner autonomy. Quantitative data were collected through questionnaires administered to 199 English-majored students in the context of a university in Mekong Delta. The results revealed that the students possessed positive perceptions toward online learning. Furthermore, the potentiality of online learning was explored including the ability of (1) planning learning experience, (2) evaluating learning performance, (3) determining learning goals, (4) self-controlling learning process, (5) taking responsibility for learning decision. Last but not least, this study expected that the proposed pedagogical implications will contribute to the innovation of promoting learner autonomy in online learning in the context of a university in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam.  Article visualizations

    ENGLISH TEACHERS’ QUESTIONS IN A VIETNAMESE HIGH SCHOOL READING CLASSROOM

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    Recently, developing students’ thinking, especially critical thinking (CT), has become a hot issue. Critical thinking has been claimed to have an important impact on learners’ reading comprehension because it can help them analyze, evaluate, construct their thinking, solving problems and reasoning (Ennis, 1989). However, the extent that teachers’ classroom activities contribute to developing students’ critical thinking has rarely been researched. The current case study was conducted with six EFL high school teachers and 10 reading lessons in Vietnam to explore the teachers’ use of questions and to analyze if these questions could facilitate the students’ critical thinking. Classroom observations and the cognitive domain of Bloom’s taxonomy were adapted as the research instruments. The study results reveal common types of questions are often used by high school teachers in their reading lessons. Suggestions are made on types of questions that teachers should function more in their class in order to enhance students’ critical thinking

    Students’ learning autonomy, involvement and motivation towards their English proficiency

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    Different factors are involved in the process of learners’ learning English as a second or foreign language. Among them, learning autonomy, involvement and motivation and attitude toward English language learning have been claimed to positively correlate with learners’ English proficiency. In the current study, 229 English-majored final-year students at a university in Vietnam were invited to participate in a survey to explore their English proficiency level and factors that may have impacted that level. Findings revealed that students’ learning autonomy and their active participation in classroom activities are the most influential on their English proficiency level after four years of learning. As a result, the study suggests that measures should be taken to improve students’ learning autonomy and classroom involvement

    THE INTERACTION BETWEEN SELF-REGULATED LEARNING STRATEGIES AND EFL TEENAGER LEARNERS’ POSTCARD WRITING AT ENGLISH CENTER IN MEKONG DELTA, VIETNAM

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    The current study aims at investigating the possible interaction of EFL teenage learners’ postcard writing performance (according to A2 level) and their self-regulated learning strategies at an English center. The research also helps to determine the level of interaction between EFL teenagers’ self-regulated learning (SRL) strategies and their postcard writing performance. Thus, it also examined the frequency of use of SRL strategies in writing among those learners. A total of 74 learners completed 32 items in the self-regulated learning strategies questionnaire including six dimensions of three categories namely environmental processes, behavioral processes, and personal processes. Then, three successful writers and three less successful writers were invited into the semi-structured interview. The findings indicated that SRL strategies had a positive impact on EFL teenage learners' postcard writing. The more SRL strategies used in writing, the higher the learners' score. Among these strategies, environmental factors may have a stronger influence than behavioral or personal factors. Specifically, environmental structuring and help-seeking strategies are most frequently used. The findings also showed that EFL teenage learners use SRL strategies to a moderate degree when given writing tasks. Besides, the results of the interview reveal that successful learners self-regulated better than less successful ones. They also self-evaluated their writing more frequently than those who are less successful. Based on the findings of this study, pedagogical implications and recommendations for further study are presented.  Article visualizations

    TEACHERS’ PERCEPTIONS TOWARD BLENDED TEACHING APPLIED IN EFL CLASSROOM

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    Blended teaching has recently attracted a lot of attention from educators and researchers worldwide. In Vietnam, blended teaching has been applied at various universities in different forms. However, few studies have been conducted to explore EFL teachers’ perceptions of the use of blended teaching in Vietnam. The current study used a questionnaire to explore the perceptions of thirty EFL teachers from a large university in Vietnam. Findings reveal that EFL teachers gain various benefits and encounter different challenges when applying blended teaching in their classrooms.  Article visualizations

    TEACHERS' EXPERIENCE WITH USING TEACHING TECHNIQUES TO PROMOTE CHILDREN'S MOTIVATION AND ENGAGEMENT IN A NON-FORMAL ENGLISH EDUCATIONAL SETTING

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    In this increasing globalized and internationalized world, teaching techniques reported to be effective in one country are more frequently adopted for use in other countries. However, these techniques may not yield similar effects across educational contexts. This article reports a study that (i) explored teaching techniques that teachers in commercial English Language Centres (CELC) in Southern Vietnam used to promote children’s learning motivation and engagement, (ii) examined why they adopted these teaching techniques and (iii) identified challenges associated with the use of these techniques. Content analysis of 21 semi-structured interviews with teachers from four CELC showed that teachers were frequently using games, picture flashcards, videos, miming, role play and storytelling for the mentioned purpose. The study also revealed several challenges for the use of these techniques associated with (i) teachers considering teaching in CELC as an extra job, (ii) educational norms and values ingrained in stakeholders’ perception, and (iii) practicality issues involved in their teaching. The article highlights that teachers’ adoption of a teaching technique was driven by their beliefs about its effectiveness, about expectations of important stakeholders, and about contextual factors that may affect the use of the technique
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