2,077 research outputs found

    Stressed out with Sepsis.

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    The review of a design practice learning project to pilot heightened social responsibility and engagement

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    This paper describes the review of a design project devised to pilot a student community learning experience at a heightened level of social responsibility. There is evidence around the world that degree level programmes are beginning this process, albeit through initial discussions (Swan, 2000). The project involved students in the use of open-space technology to promote creative team working and reflective practice reporting on the design project. The review involved a programme of qualitative research into the evidence and outputs created by the students and staff and compared these with interviews with the; participants, industrial sponsor, independent academic staff and professional designers. It was not possible to determine in the review whether the project had led to a greater level of creativity, but those involved described it as a profoundly creative experience. The findings showed that the project engendered truly effective teamworking, complete consensus to solutions amongst the students and a heightened sensitivity to societal issues. The review makes recommendations for the future development of this form of design practice learning at appropriate levels of study

    DETECTION OF CARIES ADJACENT TO TOOTH COLORED PROXIMAL RESTORATIONS USING STATIONARY INTRAORAL TOMOSYNTHESIS

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    Objectives: Caries adjacent to restorations (CAR) is the most common reason for replacing restorations. This study compared the ability of stationary intraoral tomosynthesis (s-IOT) and conventional bitewing radiographs in detecting CAR. Methods: Extracted teeth (N=77) with 113 proximal tooth-colored restorations were used. Observers (N=7) utilized a 5-point scale to rate their confidence that CAR was present and stereomicroscopy was used to establish ground truth. Results: S-IOT had a statistically higher (ANOVA p0.05). Conclusion: S-IOT showed higher diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity than conventional bitewing radiographs for detecting caries around proximal composite restorations. While the clinical effect size is small, s-IOT is a promising imaging modality for advancing the detection of CAR.Master of Scienc

    Use of Landsat Multispectral Scanner Digital Data for Mapping Suspended Solids and Salinity in the Atchafalaya Bay and Adjacent Waters, Louisiana.

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    The objective of this study was to use Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) digital data in combination with concurrently collected in situ data for the assessment and mapping of water quality parameters within Atchafalaya Bay, Louisiana and adjoining estuarine waters. The water quality parameters investigated were suspended solids and salinity. The approach required the collection of water quality samples by helicopter at 33 preselected sample sites within two hours of the overpass of the Landsat spacecraft. Statistical regression models were developed between the Landsat MSS data and each of the water quality parameter measurements. The regression models were extended to the entire study area for mapping the water quality parameters. The results included statistical summaries for the regression models and a series of coded gray maps corresponding to the digitally enhanced Landsat MSS data. A set of gray maps were produced for each of the water quality parameters, with one map representing one water class within each parameter. Based upon an analysis of the statistical results and the coded gray maps, the following conclusions were indicated: (1) Landsat MSS data provided a highly reliable method for mapping the distribution and spatial extent of suspended solids concentrations in the study area; (2) circulation patterns for suspended solids were clearly visible on the coded gray maps; and (3) the accuracy of using this type of Landsat analysis as a means of mapping salinity was doubtful

    (SNP034) Robert Hilton Corbin interviewed by Allan Tanner and Paul Lee

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    Records an interview with Robert H. Corbin, who leads a party of researchers from the National Park Service (NPS), the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC) and several family members on a walking tour of Nicholson Hollow. The primary interviewers are Allen Tanner of the PATC and Paul Lee of the NPS. Additional questions and commentary are provided by Mr. Corbin\u27s son, Joe, and other family members. The Corbin homestead was located on part of the land turned over to the NPS by the state of Virginia in the 1930s. The primary focus of the tour was the identification of home sites and their owners along the length of Nicholson Hollow. Discusses home and family life in the mountains, including the tan bark industry, apple, chestnut and ginseng harvesting, food cultivation and preservation, and the moonshine business. Community gatherings, such as weddings, funerals, corn husking and apple butter boiling parties are also discussed, with passing mentions of Camp Hoover and local entrepreneur George Pollock, owner of nearby Skyland resort. Mr. Corbin, who was nearly 80 years old, gives an extensive account of many of the inhabitants of Nicholson and Corbin Hollows, as well as Corbin Mountain. The second eldest of 21 children, Corbin was related by blood or marriage to most of the surrounding families. Some of the more notable relatives mentioned include Corbin\u27s cousin George T. Corbin, builder of the landmark Corbin Cabin, Aaron Nicholson and Phinnel Fennel Corbin, who were both featured in George Pollock\u27s book Skyland: Heart of the Shenandoah Valley. Corbin describes two local murders, including that of his father, William J. Corbin, who was killed by a family member, John Nicholson, in 1922.https://commons.lib.jmu.edu/snp/1025/thumbnail.jp

    Sustainable Cities: Canadian Reality or Urban Myth?

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    Although it is now over two decades since the Brundtland Commission report (1987) put sustainable development on the political map, concern continues in Canada that the federal government is failing to adequately implement its own commitments to tackling the ecological challenges posed by rapid urban expansion. Our analysis identifies a number of road blocks, missed opportunities and mistakes that have limited progress and many of these are traced back to the failure of national government to empower local municipal governments, as advocated by Brundtland and subsequent international initiatives, in particular ‘Agenda 21’ which we revisit in some detail as a basis for analysis. As well as reviewing the federal government’s role in Canada, the paper explores the potential for more sustainable urban growth in the context of broader reforms

    The Sermons of the Appalachian Preaching Mission 1958-1977

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    The Appalachian Preaching Mission was an annual event that took place in Johnson City and other Tennessee cities from 1955 to 1986. A 1968 history of the Mission states that its purpose “was to allow the people of the area to hear great preachers that they would not ordinarily have the opportunity to hear.” Some of those preachers lived in or near Johnson City; others came from as far away as Arizona, California, Georgia, Pennsylvania, and Texas

    Cultural Resources Report for the Cane Island Branch Section of the Buffalo Bayou Project Between Katy-Flewellen Road and Kingsland Boulevard in Fort Bend County, Texas

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    Gray & Pape, Inc., of Houston, Texas, under contract with BIO-WEST, Inc., has prepared the following report on cultural resources management activities in Fort Bend County, Texas. The project includes an archaeological survey of a total of approximately 0.93 kilometers (0.58 miles) along Buffalo Bayou between Katy-Flewellen Road and Kingsland Boulevard in Katy, Texas. The archaeological Area of Potential Effects is defined as the maintenance corridor, 30 to 60 meters (98 to 196 feet) long. The goal of this study was to assist Fort Bend County, the Texas Historical Commission, and the lead federal agency in determining whether or not intact cultural resources are present within areas for construction, and if so to provide management recommendations for these resources. All activities described herein were subject to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and issuance of an Antiquities Permit for Archeology (Permit 9319) applied for by Gray & Pape, Inc. on February 13, 2020, and issued by the Texas Historical Commission. No diagnostic or non-diagnostic artifacts were collected in the course of the current survey. As a project permitted through the Texas Historical Commission; however, Gray & Pape, Inc. submitted project records to the Center of Archaeological Studies at Texas State University. The Natural Resource Conservation Service is the lead federal agency for the project. Fieldwork was conducted between March 12 and March 16, 2020 and required approximately 40- person hours to complete. Subsurface testing included a combination of systematic shovel testing and judgement sample auger probing. The site file research revealed two previously recorded archaeological sites (41FB101 and 41FB102) are located within the project area. At the beginning of the survey, an initial attempt was made to relocate previously recorded Sites 41FB101 and 41FB102 through surface inspection and limited shovel testing across the Area of Potential Effects along both sides of Buffalo Bayou. Recent disturbances from mechanical excavation along the channel slopes, the dumping of spoil across the surface of the two-track right-of-way along the bayou, and the active installation of sheet piling were photographed and mapped. Sites 41FB101 and 41FB102 could not be relocated within the Area of Potential Effects during the surface inspection, shovel testing or auger probing. No other historic or prehistoric artifacts or cultural features were identified as a result of this survey. During the initial reconnaissance, Rangia shells (n=8), including whole (closed) specimens and half shell, were observed on the surface in an area recently disturbed by heavy machinery. The shells were located east of Site 41FB101 along the two-track right-of-way and slope of the east bank of Buffalo Bayou. The majority of them were smaller than 3 centimeters (1.2 inches), with one whole specimen measuring approximately 6 centimeters (2.4 inches). Surface and subsurface inspection in the immediate area of these specimens failed to find evidence of associated cultural features or artifacts on the surface or in a buried context. A variety of modern bricks and brick fragments were also observed along the inner slopes of the east bank near the shell scatter. These same materials were later observed among the variety of riprap materials along the west bank of the bayou west of Site 41FB102 near a residential property immediately adjacent to the Area of Potential Effects. No additional cultural materials were observed on the surface with the exception of modern debris including plastics and aluminum cans. Gray & Pape, Inc. is not recommending a site designation for the Rangia shell or brick scatter observed during the survey for the foregoing reasons:1) there were no intact, buried deposits or features found; 2) there was no material that could be positively identified as artifacts; 3) the bricks observed were modern and likely deposited by landowners in attempts to prevent erosion; 4) the size, quantity, and inclusion of whole Rangia identified on the surface appear to be natural occurrences as opposed to the remains of an archaeological deposit or feature; and 5) it is impossible to determine the original location of the shell specimens at this time. Based on the results of this investigation, Sites 41FB101 and 41FB102 do not appear to extend into the existing easement belonging to the Fort Bend County Drainage District. Instead, both sites appear to be located on private property outside of the project Area of Potential Effects. As such, these sites have not been evaluated for National Register eligibility, but Gray & Pape, Inc. recommends that there will be no direct impact to these sites. It is also recommended that because the majority of project impacts will occur within sediments that have been repeatedly impacted by past channelization activities, the potential to identify intact, significant cultural resources is low. Gray & Pape, Inc. recommends the project be allowed to proceed as currently planned. As a protective measure during construction, highvisibility temporary fencing should be installed against the edge of the Area of Potential Effects in the vicinity of the two known sites. No additional cultural resources activities are recommended unless project plans change

    Global patterns of radiocarbon depletion in subsoil linked to rock-derived organic carbon

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    Organic matter stored in sedimentary rocks is one of the largest stocks of carbon at Earth’s surface. The fate of this rock organic carbon (OCpetro) during weathering in soils influences the geological carbon cycle, and impacts soil radiocarbon content that is used to quantify soil carbon turnover. Here, we assess the potential contribution of OCpetro to soils, using a mixing model generated by a global dataset of soil radiocarbon measurements (14C). Soils developed on sedimentary rocks (rather than on igneous substrate) have a paired OC content and 14C values consistent with OCpetro input, giving rise to apparent increase in soil residence time. We call for renewed assessment of OCpetro input to soils, in terms of its impact on soil radiocarbon inventories, and its potential to release carbon dioxide
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