2,056 research outputs found

    Is maternity care in Scotland equitable? Results of a national maternity care survey

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    Objective High-quality maternity care is key to long-term improvements in population health. However, even within developed welfare systems, some mothers and babies experience poorer care and outcomes. This study aimed to explore whether women’s experiences of maternity care in Scotland differs by their physical or sociodemographic characteristics. Design Secondary analysis of the 2015 Scottish Maternity Care Experience Survey. The questionnaire was based on the Care Quality Commission English maternity survey. Setting National Health Service maternity care in Scotland. Participants The survey was distributed to 5025 women who gave birth in Scotland during February and March 2015 with 2036 respondents (41%). Main outcome measures The questionnaire explored aspects of care processes and interpersonal care experienced from the first antenatal contact (booking) to 6 weeks following the birth. The analysis investigated whether experiences were related to age, parity, deprivation, rurality, self-reported general health or presence of a health condition that limited daily activities. Analysis used mixed effect multilevel models incorporating logistic regression. Results There were associations between parity, age and deprivation with gestation at booking indicating that younger women, women from more deprived areas and multiparous women booked later. Women reporting generally poorer health were more likely to describe poorer care experiences in almost every domain including continuity, pain relief in labour, communication with staff, support and advice, involvement in decision making, confidence and trust and overall rating of care. Conclusions We found few differences in maternity care experience for women based on their physical or socioeconomic characteristics. Our findings indicate that maternity care in Scotland is generally equitable. However, the link between poorer general health after childbirth and poorer experience of maternity care is an important finding requiring further study

    The Cyanophage Molecular Mixing Bowl of Photosynthesis Genes

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    Polycombing Drosophila for Dynamic Developmental Footprints

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    Somali voices in Glasgow city : Who speaks? Who listens? An ethnography

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    Somali people have lived continuously in Glasgow since the early 2000s. Having faced the challenging circumstances of Dispersal, subsequent social inequalities, and a fast changing political climate, the population is now part of Scotland's multicultural society. However, despite this success, many Somali people do not feel that the population 'has voice' in Glasgow. As seventeen-year-old Duniya comments, 'it's like we're hidden down, under the table, we are seen, but nobody knows what we're about'. Based on two years' of ethnographic fieldwork with Somali groups and individuals in Glasgow, this thesis considers the extent to which Somali people (do not) 'have voice' in Glasgow. It finds that Somali people's communicative experiences are strongly grounded in practices and infrastructures of community, and often a combined result of 'internal' and 'external' approaches to the concept. First, considering the contribution of Somali cultures of 'voice' to Somali people's experiences in the city, I argue that, due to the particular way in which a Somali community has developed in Glasgow, people's vocal experiences have been characterised by a complex combination of cohesion and fragmentation. Second, considering the impact of 'external' approaches to 'voice' in Scotland upon Somali experiences, I identify three areas - 'community development' infrastructure, the news-media and constructions of public spaces - which place limitations on Somali people's belonging, citizenship and 'voice' in Scotland. Moreover, I suggest, the impact of these 'external' approaches to 'voice' on 'internal' vocal practices serve only to compound existing communicative inequalities. In the context of the current political climate, in which concern for people's citizenship, belonging and voices is particularly heightened, I echo Somali people's calls for increased dialogue between communities to consider the communicative inequalities that have so far been unaddressed

    Animals as intervention: How schools are making use of animals as part of their educational provision.

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    Background: The benefits of the human-animal bond have been documented across time and disciplines. More recently, international scientific research has provided promising results showing benefits to children and young people (CYP) of a range of ages, across a range of areas of impact; with no known study demonstrating a detrimental impact. However, no research to date has investigated current practice of including animals within educational settings in the UK. Aims: The aims of the current project were: 1) to explore whether, and how, animals are being included in UK based educational settings, 2) to consider what works and why to establish and incorporate animals in a school-based setting, 3) to consider what barriers exist in including animals in school-based settings and how have school staff/systems overcome them. Design: The research used a mixed methods design. Electronic surveys were sent to each statutory-aged school setting within a UK based Local Authority. From the survey respondents, 4 participants who were including animals in their setting completed semi-structured interviews. Analysis: Survey data was analysed using descriptive statistics. Interview data was analysed using thematic analysis. Findings: Results showed that approximately half of educational settings are including animals; mostly to support CYP’s general development and emotional wellbeing and mental health. All participants currently including animals intended to continue, and would recommend the practice to other settings. 5 broad themes and 10 broad subthemes were present across participants’ qualitative data. Further specific subthemes were identified for some participants; and each participant’s data was reported individually. Conclusions: The study shows UK school settings are including animals and supports previous research studies highlighting the perceived benefits of this practice. It also highlights the need and considerations required for schools to engage safely and effectively with the practice; from the perspective and experience of those currently including animals

    Cellular Inheritance

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    Professional Experience at Ohio Council for Home Care & Hospice

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    Gender segregation in apprenticeships

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    Quality of Life Among Youth with IDD in Parent-Developed Residential Program

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    My poster focuses on a research project I am conducting with a team from the Center for Community Inclusion and Disability Studies. The study is tracking changes in quality of life for six young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) as they transition into an innovative housing program developed by their parents. This new housing offers individuals their own apartments, while also providing access to communal spaces and support staff as needed. Individuals with IDD routinely experience a lower quality of life than those without IDD. Further, the nature of residential settings has been shown to affect resident’s quality of life. For this study, quality of life is being measured in three ways: (1) pre-post administration of the INICO-FEAPS Scale, and pre-post administration of a quantitative survey created for this purpose to parents and residents; (2) structured qualitative interviews of parents and residents; and (3) measures of changes in goals identified in person-centered planning meetings, along with an analysis of the methods and processes used to create those goals. To date, one round of INICO-FEAPS surveys and qualitative interviews has been conducted, and that data is currently being aggregated and thematically coded. Since the project has not yet been completed, my poster will center on its impetus, goals, and process. In addition, it will incorporate results from the first round of qualitative interviews, coupled with preliminary results of the INICO-FEAPS Scale.https://digitalcommons.library.umaine.edu/ccids_posters/1024/thumbnail.jp

    JCB content automatically deposited in PubMed Central (PMC)

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    The Journal of Cell Biology has helped define the field of cell biology. Since its establishment in 1955 by some of the founders of the discipline, the journal has attracted exciting, high quality science from leaders in the field. This is thanks in large part to a committed and active Editorial Board, selected as some of the most respected and thoughtful cell biologists throughout the world. It was therefore an honor, four months ago, to take the position of Executive Editor and work alongside current Editor-in-Chief Ira Mellman
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