118 research outputs found

    Creating Interactive Online Instruction: The McGoogan Library Experience.

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    Online instruction is a hot topic at academic medical centers. Seizing the opportunity to join the online movement at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC), the McGoogan Library created an open access course made up of six learning modules. The modules addressed three issues: 1) supplementing one-shot library instruction, 2) offering opportunity for instruction when a librarian is not embedded in a course, and 3) showcasing the library as an online instruction supporter. This article discusses the planning process, technology used, how the modules were received, and how this initial project increased McGoogan Library\u27s involvement in the UNMC online movement

    Elevating Librarian-Mediated Search Services: When 2nd Best Isn\u27t Good Enough

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    Objective: To optimize librarian-mediated search services, librarians must consider all aspects of their search service that affect service utilization and efficacy. The library literature provides little information concerning the format in which libraries are providing literature search results and even less on the effect of format on search service utilization.  At our academic health science library, the number of search requests received rose dramatically after we began providing results in RefShare format. RefShare is the collaboration tool available in ProQuest’s RefWorks®.  We wanted to know how other libraries were providing results and whether they had seen format affect search service utilization. Methods: A survey created using Springshare’s LibWizard® was distributed to the MEDLIB-L listserv, the expertsearching listserv, and through direct email to AAHSL reference and education librarians. The survey was sent out on March 31st, 2019 and closed on April 30th, 2019. We asked about the audience that the librarian/library served and requested basic information about the librarian-mediated search services offered -- with a special focus on formats used to send literature search results to the requester. Results and Conclusion: We have analyzed the survey results, and we share our findings here

    Gaps in affiliation indexing in Scopus and PubMed.

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    OBJECTIVE: The authors sought to determine whether unexpected gaps existed in Scopus\u27s author affiliation indexing of publications written by the University of Nebraska Medical Center or Nebraska Medicine (UNMC/NM) authors during 2014. METHODS: First, we compared Scopus affiliation identifier search results to PubMed affiliation keyword search results. Then, we searched Scopus using affiliation keywords (UNMC, etc.) and compared the results to PubMed affiliation keyword and Scopus affiliation identifier searches. RESULTS: We found that Scopus\u27s records for approximately 7% of UNMC/NM authors\u27 publications lacked appropriate UNMC/NM author affiliation identifiers, and many journals\u27 publishers were supplying incomplete author affiliation information to PubMed. CONCLUSIONS: Institutions relying on Scopus to track their impact should determine whether Scopus\u27s affiliation identifiers will, in fact, identify all articles published by their authors and investigators

    Following the Growth of Sarah\u27s baby: An IPE Activity for Medical Nutrition & Diagnostic Sonography Students

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    Objectives: Interprofessional education (IPE) involves collaborative learning among students from different professions. While acceptance of these types of activities is increasing, there are opportunities to expand the number of health care professions involved in IPE. The purpose of this study was to explore student perceptions and outcomes after participation in a Diagnostic Medical Sonography (DMS) and Medical Nutrition Education (MNE) interprofessional education activity centered around a clinical case study on fetal growth. Subjects & Methods: The IPE activity was administered to four student cohorts from academic years to 2015-2016 to 2018-2019. Participants included 66 students (n=39 DMS and n=27 MNE). Data was gathered through pre- & post-tests based on a patient case-study and evidence-based search skills knowledge and a post-activity survey. Assessment sessions were held on the first day and on the last day of the activity. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the mean pre-and post-test scores for the group overall, (p=https://digitalcommons.unmc.edu/cahp_mits_pres/1004/thumbnail.jp

    Identification of Diverse Mycoviruses Through Metatranscriptomics Characterization of the Viromes of Five Major Fungal Plant Pathogens

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    Mycoviruses can have a marked effect on natural fungal communities and influence plant health and productivity. However, a comprehensive picture of mycoviral diversity is still lacking. To characterize the viromes of five widely dispersed plant-pathogenic fungi, Colletotrichum truncatum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Diaporthe longicolla, Rhizoctonia solani, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, a high-throughput sequencing-based metatranscriptomic approach was used to detect viral sequences. Total RNA and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) from mycelia and RNA from samples enriched for virus particles were sequenced. Sequence data were assembled de novo, and contigs with predicted amino acid sequence similarities to viruses in the nonredundant protein database were selected. The analysis identified 72 partial or complete genome segments representing 66 previously undescribed mycoviruses. Using primers specific for each viral contig, at least one fungal isolate was identified that contained each virus. The novel mycoviruses showed affinity with 15 distinct lineages: Barnaviridae, Benyviridae, Chrysoviridae, Endornaviridae, Fusariviridae, Hypoviridae, Mononegavirales, Narnaviridae, Ophioviridae, Ourmiavirus, Partitiviridae, Tombusviridae, Totiviridae, Tymoviridae, and Virgaviridae. More than half of the viral sequences were predicted to be members of the Mitovirus genus in the family Narnaviridae, which replicate within mitochondria. Five viral sequences showed strong affinity with three families (Benyviridae, Ophioviridae, and Virgaviridae) that previously contained no mycovirus species. The genomic information provides insight into the diversity and taxonomy of mycoviruses and coevolution of mycoviruses and their fungal hosts

    Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche.

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    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signalling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition

    Thrive: Success Strategies for the Modern-Day Faculty Member

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    The THRIVE collection is intended to help faculty thrive in their roles as educators, scholars, researchers, and clinicians. Each section contains a variety of thought-provoking topics that are designed to be easily digested, guide personal reflection, and put into action. Please use the THRIVE collection to help: Individuals study topics on their own, whenever and wherever they want Peer-mentoring or other learning communities study topics in small groups Leaders and planners strategically insert faculty development into existing meetings Faculty identify campus experts for additional learning, grand rounds, etc. If you have questions or want additional information on a topic, simply contact the article author or email [email protected]://digitalcommons.unmc.edu/facdev_books/1000/thumbnail.jp
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