6 research outputs found

    Beyond the Blind Spot: Enhancing Polyphony Through City Planning Activism Using Public Participation GIS

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    A key advantage of public participation GIS (PPGIS) tools has been seen as increasing the polyphony of urban planning by reaching the wisdom of crowds. However, the challenge is to enable participation for those who do not have the skills or resources. This article describes participatory action research where the authors of the article collaborated with a local city planning activist at the Kontula Mall, Helsinki (Finland) to improve the participation of a group marginalized from the renewal process (i.e., immigrant entrepreneurs) using a PPGIS tool (Maptionnaire). The case study provided insights into the potential for city planning activism to bring out marginalized groups’ perspectives and use PPGIS. Moreover, the research also revealed barriers to polyphony in current planning practices. Nevertheless, planning activism can enable the participation of the marginalized by coming into contact with them, providing them with information, and bringing their perspectives to the collaboration. The PPGIS tool can serve as a platform to collect participatory data through different response modes. Local activism can also facilitate the questionnaire’s co-design, testing, and marketing. Therefore, a bottom-up approach can be a way to improve the impact of PPGIS and enhance polyphony in urban planning

    Ainutlaatuista, täydentävää ja epämääräistä: Osallistiedon hyödyntäminen kulttuuriympäristön arvottamisessa Sipoon Nikkilässä

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    The Finnish Cultural Foundation has funded the research of Eveliina Harsia and the European Commission's H2020 project Finest Twins (grant number 856602) research of Pilvi Nummi.Citizens' engagement with cultural environments is a central part of sustainable urban planning. In this article, we explore how diverse participatory data collected in Nikkilä, Sipoo, has been used in the valuation of the cultural environment and planning of the area. The results show that information is used sporadically, its role in planning is not articulated, and its impact on planning decisions is not expressed. However, experts value participatory information, even if it is not considered a valid argument for justifying planning decisions. As a conclusion, i.a., we provide suggestions for improving practices to put participatory information on an equal level with other planning information.Peer reviewe

    Prioritizing participatory planning solutions: Developing place-based priority categories based on public participation GIS data

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    Prioritization of knowledge produced in participatory planning has been approached mainly from the perspective of whose perspectives are most in need of consideration. We ask, whether it is also possible to consider which locations, based on the knowledge from participants, should be prioritized. We developed a place-based approach to inform spatial decision making especially when the prioritization of limited resources is necessary. In the place-based prioritization model frequency of use and perceived quality of everyday places were used to identify various priority categories. We argued that especially places that are perceived negatively but used often in daily life pose a risk to wellbeing and the quality of life and should thus be prioritized in development. Such places belonged to the Development priority category, but also three other categories, Development potential, Management potential and Management priority were identified. The prioritization model was tested empirically by using placebased knowledge about inhabitants everyday and quality networks collected in the Finnish city of Espoo. According to the results, the Development priority category was represented only in about 5% of places, most often in land associated with road and rail networks as well as in continuous urban fabric. As hypothesized, high share of the Development priority places in everyday networks reduced individual's quality of life. We also found that a rather high share of these places was located within existing planning areas of the city

    Omavaraisuus maankäytön suunnittelun tavoitteena - esimerkkialueena Granön saari Sipoossa

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    A new development area for 30 000 - 40 000 inhabitant is being planned in an √Ėstersundom component master plan, in an area owned by the municipalities of Sipoo, Vantaa and Helsinki. As part of this component master plan, the future of a special island area called Gran√∂ has also been contemplated. The study is commissioned by the municipality of Sipoo and is a preliminary report giving a basis for formulating the plan's guidelines. This study can provide background material for planning, which can also propose conventional planning principles. It is not the intention however to propose any rigid or theoretical solutions, but to offer plans for self-sufficiency based on the needs of the community. Self-sufficiency is very often found in the history of residential area planning in Finnish towns. The current opinion is that self-sufficiency relates closely to the ecological aims of urban planning. This study brings together the themes and community structures from perspective of self-sufficiency as mentioned above. With the aid of these planning principles, guidelines for community functions can be established. Resource material has been selected from relating literature, various research projects, and specialist interviews. On the basis of field visits and map analysis, landscape proposal for a preliminary plan has been made. As the result of this study, a land use plan based on a general master plan has been designed, according to plan guidelines of self-sufficiency and of a size for the building of a town of 2 300 inhabitants. Its dimensions are illustrated in the site sketches. The existing cultural setting and the aspirations of many, who are seeking a rural milieu, are taken into special consideration in the illustrated construction methods. The pursuit of self-sufficiency also involves new elements of community spirit. Self-sufficiency ambitions do not affect efficiency goals set by the authorities of Sipoo for Gran√∂ Island, and there are good possibilities to have a self-sufficient community in Gran√∂. It important to have a holistic view of the entire planning process, and this community plan is based on the possibilities of functioning urban services, energy and food production, and other similar necessities. Such a comprehensive plan requires a new type of professional skill on the part of designers, for they function as an important link between environmental goals and implementation. Self-sufficiency is worthwhile objective in land use planning when attempting to avoid negative effects on the environment.Sipoon, Vantaan ja Helsingin yhteiselle √Ėstersundomin osayleiskaava-alueelle suunnitellaan 30 000 - 40 000 asukkaan uutta kaupunginosaa. √Ėstersundomin kolmen kunnan yhteisen osayleiskaavahankeen osana pohditaan my√∂s alueen edustalla sijaitsevan Gran√∂n tulevaisuutta. T√§m√§ diplomity√∂ on laadittu Sipoon kunnan tilauksesta esiselvitykseksi, jonka avulla Gran√∂h√∂n voidaan laatia suunnitteluperiaatteet. Ty√∂ on laadittu jatkosuunnittelun ohessa k√§yt√§v√§n vuorovaikutuksen pohjaksi sek√§ vaihtoehdoksi perinteisemp√§√§ suunnittelun√§k√∂kulmaa edustaville ehdotuksille. Tarkoitus ei ole esitt√§√§ yhdyskunnan puristamista omavaraisuuden muottiin vaan pohtia mahdollisuuksia omavaraisuuteen alueen omista l√§ht√∂kohdista k√§sin. Omavaraisuus on tavoite, johon pyrkim√§ll√§ voidaan p√§√§st√§ ekologisesti kest√§v√§√§n maank√§ytt√∂√∂n, unohtamatta sosiaalista ja taloudellista hyvinvointia. Omavaraisuus on osa suomalaista kaupunki- ja asuinaluesuunnittelun historiaa. Nyky√§√§n omavaraisuus liittyy kiinte√§sti yhdyskuntasuunnittelun ekologisiin pyrkimyksiin. Diplomity√∂ss√§ on koottu yhdyskuntarakenteen teemoja ja mitoituksia omavaraisuuden n√§k√∂kulmasta. N√§iden avulla on laadittu suunnitteluperiaatteet yhdyskunnan eri osatekij√∂ille. L√§htein√§ on k√§ytetty eri alojen kirjallisuutta ja tutkimuksia sek√§ asiantuntijahaastatteluja. Esimerkkisuunnitelmaa varten on laadittu maastok√§ynnin ja karttatarkastelun perusteella maisema-analyysi alueesta. Ty√∂n tuloksena on syntynyt omavaraisuuden suunnitteluperiaatteita ja mitoituksia noudattava yleiskaavatasoinen maank√§ytt√∂suunnitelma. Mitoituksen tuloksena selvisi, ett√§ alueelle voi suunnitteluperiaatteiden mukaan muodostua 2 300 asukkaan yhdyskunta. K√§ytetty√§ mitoitusta on havainnollistettu esimerkinomaisilla tonttitarkasteluilla. Esitetyss√§ rakentamistavassa on otettu huomioon olemassa oleva kulttuuriymp√§rist√∂ sek√§ ne haaveet, joita maaseutumaisesta asuinymp√§rist√∂st√§ haetaan. Toisaalta omavaraisuuden tavoittelu tuo mukanaan uusia elementtej√§ kuten yhteis√∂llisyyden. Omavaraisuuden asettaminen tavoitteeksi Gran√∂n kohdalla ei juuri vaikuta alueelle asetettuihin tehokkuustavoitteisiin. Gran√∂ss√§ on mahdollisuudet hyvin pitk√§lti omavaraisen yhdyskunnan muodostumiseen. Maank√§yt√∂nsuunnittelun tavoitteena omavaraisuus edellytt√§√§ kokonaisuuden huomioimista. Yhdyskunnan suunnittelu l√§htee alueen mahdollisuuksien kartoittamisesta niin yhdyskuntatekniikan, energian- ja ruoantuotannon kuin palveluidenkin suhteen. Kokonaisvaltainen suunnittelu vaatii uudenlaista ammattitaitoa suunnittelijoilta, jotka ovat t√§rke√§ linkki ymp√§rist√∂tavoitteiden ja k√§yt√§nn√∂n toteutuksen v√§liss√§. Omavaraisuus maank√§yt√∂nsuunnittelun tavoitteena on yksi hyv√§ tavoite, kun halutaan mahdollistaa v√§h√§p√§√§syt√∂isempi ja v√§hemm√§n ymp√§rist√∂√§ kuormittava yhdyskuntarakenne

    Socially and culturally sustainable public participation in urban development: Map questionnaire as a bridge-building tool in Kontula shopping mall

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    | openaire: EC/H2020/856602/EU//FINEST TWINSSocial sustainability is a prerequisite for legitimate public participation. Currently, multilingualism and multiculturalism place particular demands on participation methods and processes. This article presents a case study where entrepreneurs with an immigrant background were engaged in the development process of Kontula shopping mall in Helsinki, Finland. The results show that an existing digital participation tool, specifically a map questionnaire can be utilized in a novel way in a multicultural context to build a bridge between this marginalized group and urban development. New skills and tailored methods are required to support the participation of immigrant entrepreneurs.Peer reviewe

    Prioritizing participatory planning solutions : Developing place-based priority categories based on public participation GIS data

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    Funding Information: This research was funded by NordForsk, Sustainable Urban Development and Smart Cities Programme, Project Smart Planning for Healthy and Green and Nordic Cities ‚Äď NORDGREEN, under Grant Number: 95322. Also the Transformative Cities -project funded by Academy of Finland (grant number 352947) contributed to financing the work of the first author. Funding Information: The study was carried out in the city of Espoo, Finland. Located in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Espoo is the second largest city in Finland with about 292,800 inhabitants (in 2020). The city of Espoo has actively developed its participatory planning practices for many years. This has included investing in large-scale public participation, the active use of various public participation methods including digital tools, and the development of influential participation where the knowledge produced by people is systematically analyzed and stored and actively shared and used by various sectors of the city. As part of the NordGreen research project funded by NordForsk (see: https://nordregioprojects.org/nordgreen/ ), Aalto University and the city of Espoo realized the MyEspoo survey in 2020. The survey represented the early initiation of a public participation process, where inhabitants shared their personal experiences about various parts of the city as background knowledge for planning, even before the planning process had officially started. Publisher Copyright: ¬© 2023 The Author(s)Prioritization of knowledge produced in participatory planning has been approached mainly from the perspective of whose perspectives are most in need of consideration. We ask, whether it is also possible to consider which locations, based on the knowledge from participants, should be prioritized. We developed a place-based approach to inform spatial decision making especially when the prioritization of limited resources is necessary. In the place-based prioritization model frequency of use and perceived quality of everyday places were used to identify various priority categories. We argued that especially places that are perceived negatively but used often in daily life pose a risk to wellbeing and the quality of life and should thus be prioritized in development. Such places belonged to the Development priority category, but also three other categories, Development potential, Management potential and Management priority were identified. The prioritization model was tested empirically by using place-based knowledge about inhabitants everyday and quality networks collected in the Finnish city of Espoo. According to the results, the Development priority category was represented only in about 5% of places, most often in land associated with road and rail networks as well as in continuous urban fabric. As hypothesized, high share of the Development priority places in everyday networks reduced individual's quality of life. We also found that a rather high share of these places was located within existing planning areas of the city.Peer reviewe
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