272 research outputs found

    Complaint behaviour: a study of the differences between complainants about advertising in Australia and the population at large

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    Advertising expenditure has risen globally and in Australia there has been a 2.7-fold increase in the last ten years. It is suggested that some advertisements may be &ldquo;unacceptable&rdquo;, that is, unfair, misleading, deceptive, offensive, false or socially irresponsible. This research is concerned with consumer behaviour and consumer complaint behaviour specifically in the area of advertising in Australia. The findings indicate that complainants are significantly different from the population at large. This research will afford the regulatory bodies a better understanding of the complaining public as well as educating marketing communications strategists in effectively reaching their target markets.<br /

    Opinions about advertising in Australia: a study of complainants

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    Advertising expenditure has risen globally and in Australia there has been a 2.7-fold rise in the last 10 years. It is suggested that some advertisements may be \u27unacceptable\u27, that is unfair, misleading, deceptive, offensive, false or socially irresponsible. Industry and regulatory responses to consumer complaints about these problems must be addressed. This research is concerned with consumer behaviour and consumer complaint behaviour specifically in the area of advertising in Australia. The general findings from the reviewed literature indicated that complainants tend to be older, have attained higher levels of educational qualifications, earn a higher gross weekly income, possess greater degrees of wealth, have higher participant levels of local community involvement and, in general terms, have more resources to avail themselves of in order to allow them to take action when dissatisfied. The results from this research engender a better understanding of the complaining public. Empirical analyses were used for determining the characteristics of people who complain to the Advertising Standards Board and inferred that their opinions regarding advertising differ from members of the general population in four key areas. This research will afford regulatory bodies a better understanding of the complaining public as well as educating marketing communications strategists in effectively reaching their target markets. <br /

    Potential Milk Production in the Point MacKenzie Area of Southcentral Alaska

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    Point MacKenzie is an area northwest of Anchorage directly across the Knik Arm of Cook Inlet (Figure 1 ). This area contains a substantial amount of latent agricultural land and discussion regarding its potential has been going on for some time. The catalyst which activated the recent planning process directed at Point MacKenzie was concern over potential loss of the southcentral Alaska dairy industry expressed on May 4, 1979, in a letter from Jack Flint, General Manager, Matanuska Maid, Inc., to Governor Jay Hammond: "It is my opinion that if we do not take immediate steps to stabilize this important phase of agriculture, [the dairy industry] will pass from the scene. I think that if it should occur, it would be a serious blow to the State of Alaska, economically and socially. I believe we should also realize that if the dairy industry should cease to exist within the state, it is going to be very difficult to re-establish it." Mr. Flint's letter and corresponding action by the Matanuska-Susitna Borough have directed planning processes of the State of Alaska toward Poinr Mac- Kenzie. The Alaska Agricultural Action Council, created by the 1979 state legislature to plan, recommend, and administer agricultural development projects on state lands in Alaska, held a meeting in the Matanuska Valley in September, 1979, and determined that an economic feasibility study, directed toward dairy production, should be undertaken for the Point MacKenzie area. This report is that feasibility study.The information presented in this bulletin is part of a report prepared for the Agricultural Action Council of the State of Alaska. The group was formed in 1979 by legislative action and is chaired by W. I. "Bob" Palmer, Special Projects Director, Office of the Governor. The purpose of the group is to plan and manage agricultural development projects within the state. The report on the feasibility of milk production in the Point MacKenzie Area presented to Governor Hammond through the Alaska Agricultural Action Council was prepared by the authors of this bulletin and Dr. Boyd Buxton, Agricultural Economist, U.S. D.A., stationed at the University of Minnesota at St. Paul and Dr. Paul Fuglestad, Agricultural Economist, U.S.D .A., stationed in Anchorage, Alaska, both of whom are acknowledged with gratitude. The authors also wish to thank Cathy Warren who reviewed extensively the tabular data

    Undergraduate marketing education in the UK

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    This paper summarises and reflects upon a project which was supported by a small grant from the Academy of Marketing Teaching Research and Development award scheme in 2012/2013. The project collected and mixed together publicly available data on marketing education currently provided by HEIs with more detailed and specific information received directly from individual institutions. It did this in order to provide a clear strategic overview of HE marketing and related subject programmes in the UK – numbers, structure, coverage, curriculum design, aims and objectives. 108 UK HEIs were surveyed. As a result of this, a database on current provision has been created to be shared with colleagues and a number of more specific projects are underway that it is hoped will fully exploit the data to the benefit of the Academy

    When is a dissertation not a dissertation?

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    This paper reports and reflects on a portion of the data obtained by the ‘Undergraduate Marketing in the UK’ project commissioned by the Academy of Marketing and relates specifically to the process, pedagogy and procedures by which final year projects – most commonly, dissertations – are implemented, controlled and evaluated

    Universal service obligations and the liberalization of network industries: taming the Chimera?

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    This paper considers the protection of universal service in the network industries, with a focus on the postal service and telecommunications sectors. We define the concept of universal service and explain how it was seen as a necessary quid pro quo for securing the liberalization agenda in the EU. We go on to explain and analyse the two competing means of protecting and compensating universal service, either under the State aid regime or the relevant sectoral legislation. In order to gain a better understanding of how these competing mechanisms operate in practice, we look in detail at two areas where liberalization and universal service are in particular tension: (i) high-speed broadband and (ii) letter collection and delivery. We conclude by discussing some of the problems of using State aid rules as a substitute for a sectoral framework and contemplate the future of universal service

    The Australian advertising self-regulatory framework - Who`s complaining?

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    Complaints about advertising in Australia have been on the increase in recent years under the stewardship of the new industry self-regulatory body, the Advertising Standards Board. This study utilises clustering analyses based on geodemographic and psychographic data to present a concrete profile of complainants about advertising in Australia. The findings indicate that the advertising publics must shoulder responsibility and ensure that greater care is taken to include all members of Australian society in the current complaintsprocess and that this inclusivity will ensure that the highest possible standards are the norms of the industry.<br /

    Who are they? A profile of complainants about advertising in Australia

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    Advertising expenditure in Australia has almost doubled in the last 10 years even though some advertisements maybe \u27\u27unacceptable.&quot; We investigated consumer complaint responses specifically within the area of advertising in Australia. Our findings indicate that these complainants to be older, more highly educated and more likely to be female, than the population at large.<br /

    Management education by the French Grandes Ecoles de Commerce

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    This essay presents a comprehensive briefing on the past and present of a business educational culture that is significantly different in ethos and structure to the widely known systems in the US and UK. That is the history and culture of the French Grandes Ecoles de Commerce. A brief reminder of extant literature on the utility of business education and its seeming misalignment with the competencies and skills as specified by practitioners is then given. Key pressures and trends on and within this system – such as internationalisation, accreditation and a greater emphasis on publications are identified and discussed. These threads are then combined in a partial replication of the work of Dierdorff and Rubin (2006; 2009). Specifically, collated information on 1582 classes from 542 programmes at the top Grandes Ecoles de Commerce is presented alongside further secondary data and then analysed in respect of alignment with Rubin and Dierdorff’s identified behavioural competencies. We argue that the outcome of these pressures may well be that inherent and historical strengths of great value are being discarded, and that the degree of irrelevance and misalignment between educational provision and required managerial competence will stay the same or even get worse
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