1,915 research outputs found

    MEASURING CHILDREN’S TIME USE: A REVIEW OF METHODOLOGIES AND FINDINGS

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    For those interested in child wellbeing, time use can provide an unusually objective measure of exactly what youth are doing. Before we can evaluate how well children are doing and why some are doing better than others, it is important to understand what they are doing, with whom, and in which social contexts and institutions. The report is intended to serve as a basic starting point for those interested in pursuing research in children and adolescents’ time use. It presents an overview of recent research on how American youth use time, focusing on methodological issues in measuring their time use and highlighting substantive findings from the literature. The procedures, advantages, and disadvantages of the three primary methods of measuring children’s time use, along with general issues which are relevant to all three methods, are discussed. Findings include general results about how youth divide their time between life’s domains such as work, maintenance, and leisure, relationships between time use and outcomes, and how youth differ in time use by race, class, gender, and age, with special attention paid to the area which has inspired the most time-use research, girls’ and boys’ household work.

    Environmental modelling of the Chief Information Officer

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    Since the introduction of the term in the 1980’s, the role of the Chief Information Officer (CIO) has been widely researched. Various perceptions and dimensions of the role have been explored and debated. However, the explosion in data proliferation (and the inevitable resulting information fuelled change) further complicates organisational expectations of the CIOs role. If organisations are to competitively exploit the digital trend, then those charged with recruiting and developing CIOs now need to be more effective in determining (and shaping) CIO traits and attributes, within the context of their own organisational circumstances and in line with stakeholder expectations. CIOs also need to determine their own suitability and progression within their chosen organisation if they are to remain motivated and effective. Before modelling the role of the future CIO, it is necessary to synthesise our current knowledge (and the lessons learnt) about the CIO. This paper, therefore, aims to identify and summate the spectrum of key researched ‘themes’ pertaining to the role of the CIO. Summating previous research, themes are modelled around four key CIO ‘dimensions’, namely (1) Impacting factors, (2) Controlling factors (3) Responses and (4) CIO ‘attributes’. Having modelled the CIOs current environment, and recognising the evolving IT enabled information landscape, the authors call for further research to inform the recruitment and development of the future CIO in terms of personal attributes and the measurable impact such attributes will have on their respective organisation

    Neighborhood Violence and Adolescent Friendship

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    This paper investigates the social consequences of neighborhood violence. Using ego-centered friendship network data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a survey of adolescents in the United States in the mid-1990s, it examines the relationship between neighborhood violence and the quantity, closeness, and composition of adolescent same-sex friendships. Though neighborhood violence is unrelated to quantity and closeness net of individual and family characteristics, it predicts boys’ friendships with individuals who no longer attend school (who are presumably older or have dropped out of school) and predicts boys’ and girls’ friendships with individuals who attend other schools. These results are consistent with the theory that violence and fear of victimization focus adolescents’ social attention on their neighborhoods and lead them to develop friendships with individuals who can help them to stay safe. By structuring who adolescents interact with, neighborhood violence may play a role in determining the cultural messages and ideals to which they are exposed

    [(4-Bromo­phen­yl)(2-pyridyl­methyl­idene)amine-κ2 N,N′]bis­(1,1,1,5,5,5-hexa­fluoro­pentane-2,4-dionato-κ2 O,O′)cobalt(II)

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    In the title complex, [Co(C5HF6O2)2(C12H9BrN2)], the CoII atom exhibits a pseudo-octa­hedral coordination geometry, comprising two N-donor atoms from a bidentate chelate (4-bromo­phen­yl)(2-pyridyl­methyl­idene)amine (ppaBr) ligand [Co—N = 2.098 (2) and 2.209 (2) Å] and four O-donor atoms from two bidentate chelate 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexa­fluoro­pentane-2,4-dionate (hfac) ligands [Co—O range = 2.0452 (19)–2.0796 (19) Å]. The packing of the structure involves weak π–π inter­actions between the pyridyl and benzene rings of neighbouring ppaBr ligands [centroid–centroid distance = 3.928 (2) Å] and inter­actions between the Br atom on the ppaBr ligand and the hfac ligand [Br⋯C = 3.531 (2) Å]

    (Di-2-pyridyl­amine-κ2 N,N′)[hydro­tris­(3,5-diphenyl­pyrazol-1-yl-κN 2)borato]nickel(II) bromide dichloro­methane monosolvate

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    In the title compound, [Ni(C45H34BN6)(C10H9N3)]Br·CH2Cl2, the NiII atom is five-coordinated by the tridentate hydro­tris­(3,5-diphenyl­pyrazol­yl)borate ligand and a bidentate di-2-pyridyl­amine ligand in a distorted square-pyramidal geometry. In the crystal, inter­molecular N—H⋯Br and C—H⋯Br hydrogen bonds link the Ni complex cations and the Br− ions, forming a chain along the c axis

    Tris(phenanthroline-κ2 N,N′)cobalt(II) tetra­fluoridoborate acetonitrile solvate

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    In the crystal structure of the title compound, [Co(C12H8N2)3](BF4)2·CH3CN, the mol­ecular packing involves dimers of distorted octahedrally coordinated cations which are held together by one π–π [centroid–centroid = 3.542 (4) Å] and two C—H⋯π inter­actions [2.573 (4) Å] resulting in a P4AE (Parallel Fourfold Aryl Embrace) motif. The anions are found in aryl boxes formed from the phenanthroline ligands

    [4-Bromo-N-(pyridin-2-yl­methyl­idene)aniline-κ2 N,N′]bis­(1,1,1,5,5,5-hexa­fluoro­pentane-2,4-dionato-κ2 O,O′)nickel(II)

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    The title compound, [Ni(C5HF6O2)2(C12H9BrN2)], the NiII atom exhibits a pseudo-octa­hedral coordination geometry. The structure packs through C—H⋯Br inter­actions, forming a hydrogen-bonded ladder. There are also strong hydrogen-bonding inter­actions between two of the O atoms of the β-diketonate ligands and two H atoms on the pyridine ring of the Schiff base ligand
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