351 research outputs found

    E-learning adoption in universities: the ‘gazebo’ effect of the social system on diffusion.

    Get PDF
    The implementation of e-learning in universities is often explored through the conceptual framework of the innovation diffusion model (Rogers 2003). Analysis using the five adopter categories or the characteristics of the innovation is common, but a less frequently explored element is the influence on diffusion of the social system within which the individual adopters are situated. The paper considers the potential of this element of Rogers’ model to explain the diffusion of e-learning within the social system of a university and demonstrates that the nature of universities, traditionally considered to be highly decentralized organizations composed of many ‘ivory gazebos’ rather than a single ‘ivory tower’, may expose some challenges to the usefulness of the model. Factors considered include the ambiguity of management positions and the nature of communication in devolved departments

    PDP4Life: personal development planning for lifelong learning. Final Report.

    Get PDF
    Many HEIs have developed electronic Personal Development Planning (e-PDP) systems that support the learner through the processes of personal development planning, however, little attention appeared to have been paid to developing frameworks within these systems to enable learners to merge formal and informal records of learning into a single database, to transfer records from one institutional learning environment to another, and to access and manipulate their learner records when not registered within a place of study. PDP4Life attempted to address these issues. This final project report outlines the outcomes of this JISC project

    PDP4XL2: Personal Development Planning for Cross-Institutional Lifelong Learning. Final Report.

    Get PDF
    This collaborative project PDP4XL2 built on the strengths and successful outcomes of PDP4Life and took as its principal focus the use of personal development planning and e-portfolios to develop and sustain favourable learner attitudes towards lifelong learning and to understand the role that technology plays in supporting that process. Project objectives included identifying student and employer attitudes to and usage of PDP and e-portfolios in the creative industries and health cares. This final report documents the outcomes of the project

    E-learning Series No. 1: A guide for senior managers

    Get PDF
    This guide to e-learning for senior managers in universities outlines the context for e-learning and its use in higher education, both nationally and internationally. It identifies potential benefits and addresses the key issues in implementing e-learning successfully, including costs. It also highlights likely future developments

    Student feedback on feedback.

    Get PDF
    Bournemouth University introduced a standard three week turnaround time for feedback on assessed coursework to improve the student experience. After four years of monitoring the policy, a study was undertaken to investigate its impact on the student experience. Drawing on NSS analysis and literature to develop questions, focus groups were held with students to explore their views on the quality of feedback provided, its timeliness and usefulness. Initial analysis indicates that students demonstrate a nuanced understanding of the topic, valuing timely feedback, but prepared to tolerate delays in return for lengthier feedback tailored to their individual progress. The findings from this study, aimed initially at increasing understanding of the student experience, also hold implications for institutional policy and practice related to feedback. Participants at the workshop were invited to discuss the findings with reference to the notion of “students as customers” and the market orientation of HE

    Educational developers as “insider researchers”: possibilities and pitfalls.

    Get PDF
    Undertaking research inside the university where you work is a common situation for educational developers. However, taking on the role of “insider researcher”, while remaining in your substantive position in the organisation, presents significant challenges, not only for the conduct and reporting of the research, but also for your own personal position, ie: it has both possibilities and pitfalls. This paper will examine the issues that can arise when researching e-learning in the familiar setting of your own university and discuss approaches to understanding the influence of these on the conduct of your research and subsequent professional practice

    Reviews

    Get PDF
    P. Race, 500 Tips on Group Learning, London: Kogan Page, 2000. ISBN: 0–7494–2884–8. Softback, vii + 135 pages, £15.99

    Innovative Practice Developing social integration to enhance student retention and success in higher education: the GROW@BU initiative

    Get PDF
    Widening participation and ensuring fair access to universities for ‘non-traditional’ students is a major concern of higher education in England. Outcomes are evaluated in terms of increased recruitment of non-traditional students and also increased retention of these students. Retention initiatives have gradually become more nuanced; there has been a shift from models of support for students towards ones of engagement with students. This has involved a change in focus from instrumental support such as study skills to address deficits in academic performance to more holistic approaches aimed at enhancing student integration within the university community. This paper describes a retention programme that aims to help students integrate socially with other students and staff. By supporting students’ growth of identity and social belonging, it aims to increase engagement with their academic work. Students whose profiles pose greater risk of leaving early, such as mature students and those living at home while studying locally, were investigated in the evaluation and appeared to benefi
    corecore