33 research outputs found

    Integration of Small Farmers into Value Chains: Evidence from Eastern Europe and Central Asia

    Get PDF
    The economic breakdown of the early transition process weighed heavily on food supply relationships in the Eastern European and Central Asian (EECA) countries. Small and medium-sized farm suppliers and processors suffered from lack of necessary production inputs whereas processors and retailers faced problems of insufficient quantity and quality of supplies. At the same time, changes in consumer demand as well as the accompanying entry of foreign investors in the retail and processing sectors necessitated significant and lengthy reforms and adjustments in the structure of food commodity chains to overcome these problems. Based on an extensive literature overview and a synthesis of five case studies conducted upon the assignment of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, the current chapter demonstrates how small and medium-sized food processors manage to install effective procurement systems in weak institutional environments of EECA. The chapter also identifies the factors that drive small farmer-processor business linkages and their integration into national and international value chains in order to develop options for support and assistance

    Agri-food business: global challenges - innovative solutions

    Get PDF
    The rise of a western-style middle class in many successful emerging economies like China currently is inducing deep structural changes on agricultural world markets and within the global agri-food business. As a result of both higher incomes and concerns over product safety and quality the global demand for high-quality and safe food products is increasing significantly. In order to meet the new required quality, globally minimum quality standards are rising and private standards emerging. All over the world these developments cause adjustments at the enterprise, chain and market levels. At the same time, the tremendously increasing demand for renewable energy has led to the emergence of a highly promising market for biomass production. This has far-reaching consequences for resource allocation in the agri-food business, for the environment, for the poor in developing countries and for agricultural policy reforms. The challenges increase with ongoing liberalisation, globalisation and standardisation, all of which change trade patterns for agricultural and food commodities, and influence production costs and commodity prices. CONTENTS: Preface... i; On the political economy of food standards ... 1, Johan F. M. Swinnen, Thijs Vandemoortele; An analytical framework for the study of deviant behaviour in production... 11, Norbert Hirschauer, Gaetano Martino; Netchain innovations for sustainable pork supply chains in an EU Context... 22, Rannia Nijhoff-Savvaki, Jacques Trienekens, Onno Omta; Inclusion of dairy farms in supply chain in Bulgaria - Modes, efficiency, perspectives... 35, Hrabrin Bachev; The effective traceability on the example of Polish supply chain ... 47, Agnieszka Bezat, Sebastian Jarzebowski; Geographical indications in transition countries: Governance, vertical integration and territorial impact. Illustration with case studies from Serbia... 58, Marguerite Paus; Processing and marketing feasibility of underutilized fruit species of Rajasthan, India ... 70, Dheeraj Singh, Lobsang Wangshu, V. C. Prahalad; Future impact of new technologies upon food quality and health in Central Eastern European countries... 82, Lajos Zolt√°n Bakucs, Imre Ferto, Attila Havas; Are food industry companies interested in co-financing collective agricultural marketing?... 95, Anik√≥ T√≥th, Csaba Forg√°cs; Farmers' reasons for engaging in bioenergy utilisation and their institutional context: A case study from Germany ... 106, Melf-Hinrich Ehlers; Degree and pattern of agro-food trade integration of South-Eastern European countries with the European Union ... 118, ҆tefan Bojnec, Imre Ferto; Competitiveness of cotton and wheat production and processing in Central Asia ... 133, Inna Levkovych --

    "The Cradle of Wine Civilization" - Current Developments in the Wine Industry of the Caucasus

    Get PDF
    Wine has been cultivated in the Caucasus for thousands of years. Caucasian viticulture experienced its greatest evolution and development during Soviet rule. However, Gorbachev's anti-alcohol policy and the transformation processes in the 1990s led to a dramatic decline in wine production. For the last 15 years, the viticulture in this region has experienced rediscovery, renewal, and growth. Although Russia remains the largest and most important export market for the wines from Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan, all three countries try to diversify export destinations and to penetrate non-CIS countries. The following article outlines the developments in the wine industry of these three Caucasian countries and identifies similarities between them

    The Significance of Blockchain Governance in Agricultural Supply Networks

    Get PDF
    Firms in the agri-food sector have started implementing blockchain technology to both provide transparency over the supply chain transactions and to make trust attributes visible to consumers. Besides the well-known public blockchains such as Bitcoin and Ethereum, private- and consortium-type blockchain platforms exist. The latter ones are being operated in the agri-food ecosystem contributing to the vertically cooperated supply networks that are coordinated by a focal firm. Stakeholders’ attitude and behavioral intentions toward the use of the blockchain technology impact their use behavior. The results show that permissioned blockchain governance mechanisms with consensus and incentives to motivate stakeholders are lacking in private and consortium blockchains. This study closes a research gap as understanding how the stakeholder management approach can compensate for the lack of consensus mechanisms can provide managerial guidance toward the development of an effective stakeholder management strategy, which eventually can be provided for a competitive advantage. As there is little research on the role of blockchain as a novel governance mechanism, this research will contribute to the scholarly discussion toward a common understanding

    Nachhaltiges Wirtschaften im Kontext deutscher Winzergenossenschaften

    No full text
    In Europa haben Genossenschaften eine lange Tradition und sind im landwirtschaftlichen Sektor weit verbreitet. Im Weinsektor haben Genossenschaften in einigen EU-L√§ndern sogar einen Marktanteil von mehr als 50 %. Trotz des R√ľckgangs der Zahl der Genossenschaften, der Mitglieder und der genossenschaftlich bewirtschafteten Rebfl√§che machen die Winzergenossenschaften immer noch rund ein Viertel der deutschen Rebfl√§che aus. Aufgrund der Entwicklungen im Bereich der Nachhaltigkeit stehen die Genossenschaften zunehmend unter Druck. Eine Studie zu den Reaktionen der Winzergenossenschaften auf die hohe Wettbewerbsintensit√§t im deutschen Weinmarkt aus dem Jahr 2019 zeigt, dass das Thema Nachhaltigkeit in der strategischen Ausrichtung der Genossenschaften bisher kaum Beachtung findet. Die Umsetzung nachhaltiger Ma√ünahmen (auf √∂kologischer, √∂konomischer und sozialer Ebene) wurde bisher nicht explizit f√ľr Winzergenossenschaften analysiert. Ziel dieses Beitrags ist es, einen ersten Einblick zu geben wie die Gesch√§ftsf√ľhrung von Winzergenossenschaften das Konstrukt Nachhaltigkeit wahrnimmt und welche Ma√ünahmen Winzergenossenschaften in Bezug auf die √∂kologische, √∂konomische und soziale Nachhaltigkeit anwenden. F√ľr die empirische Erhebung wurde aufgrund fehlenden Literatur zu diesem Thema ein qualitativer Ansatz gew√§hlt, welcher Experteninterviews mit dem Management von Winzergenossenschaften (n=13) sowie mit anderen Experten aus dem Genossenschaftswesen (n=4) umfasst. Die Daten wurden inhaltsanalytisch ausgewertet. Die Ergebnisse beschreiben den aktuellen Stand in Bezug auf nachhaltiges Wirtschaften in Winzergenossenschaften. Auch wenn das allgemeine Verst√§ndnis von Nachhaltigkeit bei den Befragten recht √§hnlich ist, unterscheidet sich die Operationalisierung in den Genossenschaften stark. Weitere M√∂glichkeiten f√ľr zuk√ľnftige Forschung und die Limitationen der Studie werden aufgezeigt

    Wirkung von Einflussstrategien auf das Verhalten von Mitgliedern am Beispiel von Winzergenossenschaften

    No full text
    Seit √ľber 20 Jahren ist der deutsche Weinmarkt ges√§ttigt mit dem Ergebnis, dass dort eine hohe Wettbewerbsintensit√§t herrscht. Auf diesem Verdr√§ngungsmarkt konkurrieren die Genossenschaften mit den gro√üen Abf√ľllern und Weing√ľtern um die wenigen Pl√§tze im Lebensmitteleinzelhandel und Discount. Somit sind die die H√§ndler in der Lage Qualit√§t und Quantit√§t klar vorzugeben. Folglich bestehen die Herausforderungen f√ľr das Management von Prim√§rgenossenschaften auf der einen Seite in der Bereitstellung gro√üer qualitativ hochwertiger und homogener Weinmengen und auf der anderen Seite in der Ber√ľcksichtigung der Auswirkungen ihres Handelns auf die Mitgliederbeziehung. In diesem Kontext ist das Ziel dieses Artikels zu untersuchen, welche Einflussstrategien zur Produktion von Qualit√§tswein sich f√ľr Gesch√§ftsf√ľhrer von Genossenschaften anbieten, um ihre Lieferanten bzw. Eigent√ľmer bestm√∂glich zu koordinieren

    Die Umsetzung von Weintourismus als Vermarktungsinstrument bei Winzergenossenschaften

    No full text
    Aufgrund des zunehmenden nationalen und internationalen Wettbewerbs, muss sich die deutsche Weinwirtschaft neue Diversifikationsm√∂glichkeiten erarbeiten. Eine dieser M√∂glichkeiten ist der Weintourismus. Hier haben auch deutsche Winzergenossenschaften die M√∂glichkeit, dieses Potential f√ľr sich zu nutzen. In dieser Untersuchung wird das in der Literatur noch neue Ph√§nomen beleuchtet, inwieweit sich Winzergenossenschaften im Bereich des Weintourismus engagieren und welche Ziele sie damit verfolgen. Zudem wird eruiert, inwieweit sich die Mitglieder einer Winzergenossenschaft als Multiplikatoren bei der Durchf√ľhrung von weintouristischen Aktivit√§ten einbringen. Des Weiteren wird die definitorische BegriÔ¨Äichkeit des Weintourismus genauer analysiert. In der Arbeit zeigte sich, dass Winzergenossenschaften ebenso wie Weing√ľter weintouristische Aktivit√§ten in ihre Unternehmensstruktur integriert haben. Dies erfolgt im Gegensatz zu den meisten Weing√ľtern nicht mit dem Ziel, eine eigene Wertsch√∂pfung zu generieren, sondern dient eher als reines Marketinginstrument. Hierbei wird unterschieden zwischen Genossenschaften mit vermehrtem indirektem Vertrieb, die diese Kommunikationsma√ünahme als Direktkommunikation f√ľr die Erschlie√üung neuer Zielgruppen sehen, bzw. Genossenschaften mit vermehrtem direktem Vertrieb, welche die Verkaufsf√∂rderung verfolgen. Bei der Umsetzung der jeweiligen weintouristischen Aktivit√§ten zeigte sich, dass noch Potential f√ľr Innovationen besteht. Auch die M√∂glichkeiten der Einbindung der Mitglieder als Multiplikatoren bei der Durchf√ľhrung, Kommunikation oder auch Anbindung an die Genossenschaft durch weintouristische Aktivit√§ten wird von vielen Gesch√§ftsf√ľhrern untersch√§tzt. Hinsichtlich der Definition l√§sst sich festhalten, dass Weintourismus immer - je nach Blickwinkel - die Sichtweise des Anbieters oder Nachfragers annimmt

    Are Co-operatives a Way to Integrate Small Farmers in Supply Chain Networks? Preliminary Thoughts on Hungary

    No full text
    Vertical coordination in agri-food chains is a significant and increasing phenomenon in Central and Eastern European Countries (CEEC). It has been observed that this development prefers large scale production. However, the agricultural sector is still a mixture of small scale and large scale farming in these countries. Hence, for small scale farmers, horizontal collaboration can be assumed to be a prerequisite for remaining in the market. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to investigate whether co-ops are appropriate means for integrating small farmers into modern supply systems. Further, we want to analyze how cooperatives can cope with the quality demands they face in modern distribution channels

    Die Umsetzung von Weintourismus als Vermarktungsinstrument bei Winzergenossenschaften

    No full text
    Aufgrund des zunehmenden nationalen und internationalen Wettbewerbs, muss sich die deutsche Weinwirtschaft neue Diversifikationsm√∂glichkeiten erarbeiten. Eine dieser M√∂glichkeiten ist der Weintourismus. Hier haben auch deutsche Winzergenossenschaften die M√∂glichkeit, dieses Potential f√ľr sich zu nutzen. In dieser Untersuchung wird das in der Literatur noch neue Ph√§nomen beleuchtet, inwieweit sich Winzergenossenschaften im Bereich des Weintourismus engagieren und welche Ziele sie damit verfolgen. Zudem wird eruiert, inwieweit sich die Mitglieder einer Winzergenossenschaft als Multiplikatoren bei der Durchf√ľhrung von weintouristischen Aktivit√§ten einbringen. Des Weiteren wird die definitorische BegriÔ¨Äichkeit des Weintourismus genauer analysiert. In der Arbeit zeigte sich, dass Winzergenossenschaften ebenso wie Weing√ľter weintouristische Aktivit√§ten in ihre Unternehmensstruktur integriert haben. Dies erfolgt im Gegensatz zu den meisten Weing√ľtern nicht mit dem Ziel, eine eigene Wertsch√∂pfung zu generieren, sondern dient eher als reines Marketinginstrument. Hierbei wird unterschieden zwischen Genossenschaften mit vermehrtem indirektem Vertrieb, die diese Kommunikationsma√ünahme als Direktkommunikation f√ľr die Erschlie√üung neuer Zielgruppen sehen, bzw. Genossenschaften mit vermehrtem direktem Vertrieb, welche die Verkaufsf√∂rderung verfolgen. Bei der Umsetzung der jeweiligen weintouristischen Aktivit√§ten zeigte sich, dass noch Potential f√ľr Innovationen besteht. Auch die M√∂glichkeiten der Einbindung der Mitglieder als Multiplikatoren bei der Durchf√ľhrung, Kommunikation oder auch Anbindung an die Genossenschaft durch weintouristische Aktivit√§ten wird von vielen Gesch√§ftsf√ľhrern untersch√§tzt. Hinsichtlich der Definition l√§sst sich festhalten, dass Weintourismus immer - je nach Blickwinkel - die Sichtweise des Anbieters oder Nachfragers annimmt

    Cooperatives in the Wine Industry: Sustainable Management Practices and Digitalisation

    No full text
    In Europe, cooperatives have a long tradition and are widespread in the agricultural sector. Cooperatives in the wine sector of some EU countries even surpass a market share of more than 50%. In Germany, the first wine cooperative was established in 1868 in the Ahr region. Despite the decline in the number of cooperatives, of members and of the vineyard area cultivated by cooperatives, wine cooperatives are still accountable for roughly a quarter of the German vineyard area. Due to developments in the field of sustainability and digitalisation, cooperatives are facing increasing pressure. Based on the definition of cooperatives by the International Co-operative Alliance, one can conclude that cooperatives are a sustainable form of enterprise. A previous study from 2019 showed that sustainability and digitalisation were not mentioned by cooperative management as important topics in the competitive analysis. Also, sustainable management practices have not been analysed explicitly for wine cooperatives so far. We therefore consider sustainability and digitalisation in the context of the strategic management of wine cooperatives. Our article does not aim to show further development in the areas of sustainability and digitalisation but rather to unveil existing managerial practices in order to provide a basis for management decisions. As only limited knowledge exists, a qualitative approach was chosen. Interviews were conducted with the management of wine cooperatives (n = 13) and representatives of the regional and national cooperative associations, which in turn represent the wine cooperatives as a whole (n = 4). A data content analysis was performed. The results describe state of the art of sustainable management practices and digitalisation in wine cooperatives. Even if the understanding of sustainability and digitalisation is quite similar among the respondents, the operationalisation in the cooperatives differs strongly. However, it is clear that innovation, adaptability and sustainability are strongly interlinked. Options for future research and the limitations of the study are provided as well
    corecore