52 research outputs found

    The Problem of Wage Theft

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    Wage theft inflicts serious harm on America\u27s working poor but has received little attention from policymakers seeking to address income inequality in the United States. This Article provides a comprehensive analysis of the causes of the wage theft crisis and the failure of the current enforcement regime to address it. It argues that existing policy reforms will fail, because they misunderstand the nature of the crisis and the incentives that employers face when deciding to steal workers\u27 wages. It then proposes series of reforms that could work, while arguing that changing the economic calculus alone will be unlikely to solve the problem if social norms remain unchanged

    The #Buffalo 25 and the New Era of Immigration Enforcement

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    Strengthening knowledge and awareness in family services of domestic abuse (SKAFADA)

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    This rapid scoping study, conducted by researchers from the University of Central Lancashire and King’s College London, provides evidence on the knowledge, understanding, and skills of the Early Help and Family Support workforces in England with regard to domestic abuse. Early Help (EH) is designed to intervene before challenges in families reach the threshold where statutory safeguarding services are required, whereas Family Support (FS) provides services and interventions for vulnerable families and where children are defined as ‘in need’. These local authority (LA) workforces often collaborate with other partners to work with adults to develop parenting skills as well as in direct work with children. Early Help/Family Support practitioners have high levels of contact with families experiencing domestic abuse, and so it is important that the training and development they receive equips them with the tools they need to identify and deal with situations of domestic abuse

    Randomised controlled trials of mental health nurse‐delivered interventions: A systematic review

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    Introduction Nurses are the largest professional disciplinary group working in mental health services and have been involved in numerous trials of nursing-specific and multidisciplinary interventions. Systematic appraisal of relevant research findings is rare. Aim To review trials from the core Anglosphere (UK, US, Canada, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand) published from 2005-2020. Method A systematic review reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses. Comprehensive electronic database searches were conducted. Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials of mental health nurse-delivered interventions conducted in relevant countries. Risk of bias was independently assessed. Synthesis involved integration of descriptive statistics of standardised metrics and study bias. Results Outcomes from 348 between-group comparisons were extracted from K=51 studies (N=11,266 participants), Standardised effect sizes for 68 (39 very small/small, 29 moderate/large) statistically significant outcomes from 30 studies were calculable. All moderate/large effect sizes were at risk of bias. Discussion Trial evidence of effective mental health nurse-delivered interventions is limited. Many studies produced few or no measurable benefits; none demonstrated improvements related to personal recovery. Implications for practice Mental health nurses should look beyond gold standard RCT evidence, and to evidence-based interventions that have not been trialled with mental health nurse delivery

    Prospective Home-use Study on Non-invasive Neuromodulation Therapy for Essential Tremor.

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    Highlights: This prospective study is one of the largest clinical trials in essential tremor to date. Study findings suggest that individualized non-invasive neuromodulation therapy used repeatedly at home over three months results in safe and effective hand tremor reduction and improves quality of life for many essential tremor patients. Background: Two previous randomized, controlled, single-session trials demonstrated efficacy of non-invasive neuromodulation therapy targeting the median and radial nerves for reducing hand tremor. This current study evaluated efficacy and safety of the therapy over three months of repeated home use. Methods: This was a prospective, open-label, post-clearance, single-arm study with 263 patients enrolled across 26 sites. Patients were instructed to use the therapy twice daily for three months. Pre-specified co-primary endpoints were improvements on clinician-rated Tremor Research Group Essential Tremor Rating Assessment Scale (TETRAS) and patient-rated Bain & Findley Activities of Daily Living (BF-ADL) dominant hand scores. Other endpoints included improvement in the tremor power detected by an accelerometer on the therapeutic device, Clinical and Patient Global Impression scores (CGI-I, PGI-I), and Quality of Life in Essential Tremor (QUEST) survey. Results: 205 patients completed the study. The co-primary endpoints were met (p≪0.0001), with 62% (TETRAS) and 68% (BF-ADL) of \u27severe\u27 or \u27moderate\u27 patients improving to \u27mild\u27 or \u27slight\u27. Clinicians (CGI-I) reported improvement in 68% of patients, 60% (PGI-I) of patients reported improvement, and QUEST improved (p = 0.0019). Wrist-worn accelerometer recordings before and after 21,806 therapy sessions showed that 92% of patients improved, and 54% of patients experienced ≥50% improvement in tremor power. Device-related adverse events (e.g., wrist discomfort, skin irritation, pain) occurred in 18% of patients. No device-related serious adverse events were reported. Discussion: This study suggests that non-invasive neuromodulation therapy used repeatedly at home over three months results in safe and effective hand tremor reduction in many essential tremor patients

    Proceedings of the Third Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: A Review of Emerging Issues and Technologies

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    The proceedings of the 3rd Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank summarize the most contemporary clinical, electrophysiological, imaging, and computational work on DBS for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease. Significant innovations of the past year are emphasized. The Think Tank\u27s contributors represent a unique multidisciplinary ensemble of expert neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, scientists, engineers, and members of industry. Presentations and discussions covered a broad range of topics, including policy and advocacy considerations for the future of DBS, connectomic approaches to DBS targeting, developments in electrophysiology and related strides toward responsive DBS systems, and recent developments in sensor and device technologies
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