246 research outputs found

    Impact of spring warming on sowing times of cereal, potato and sugar beet in Finland

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    Historical data were used to determine if the warm springs experienced in recent decades have influenced time of sowing of spring cereals (barley, wheat and oats), potato and sugar beet in Finland. The start of the thermal growing season was used to represent all climatic factors affecting sowing time. Regional anomalies in sowing and start of growing season were computed for the years 1965–2007. The start of the growing season was 2–2.8 days earlier per decade, with a steeper increase since 1980. Sugar beet sowing advanced 2.5 (since 1980 5.2) and potato planting 3.4 (since 1980 4.5) days per decade, more than expected solely due to earlier starts to the growing season. Sowing of spring cereals advanced 0.6, 0.7 and 1.7 days per decade in the east, north and west respectively (since 1980 1.0, 1.9 and 3.1), with statistically significant trend (p < 0.01) in the west. Earlier sowings can be largely explained by warmer springs, but the trend was not as steep as that for the growing season. This has however not led to increased temperatures during early vegetative phases and thus faster development and increased drought or pest risk, which would have reduced the positive effects of earlier sowing on yield potential. Earlier sowing detected in the west can be explained by changes in spring temperatures, but may also result from economic and technological development. Farmers seem to have adequately adjusted their field activities to the changes in spring temperatures

    How to find a good crop variety for organic farming?

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    Organic farming requires crop varieties specifically bred and selected under organic conditions. EU offers funding for research (Horizon2020, 2017-2021) to improve the availability of seed and selection of high-quality varieties for organic production

    Climate change and its effects on agricultural production in Finland – research efforts during the past 50 years

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    Climate change has concerned the scientific community since the 1970´s, stimulating research into its impacts, adaptation and mitigation. In 1988 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was established to coordinate the research. The first scientific publications on the effects of climate change on agriculture and forestry in Finland appeared in the early 1980´s. After the launch of the Finnish Research Program on Climate Change (SILMU) in 1990, the number of climate-related projects and publications, and the input of Finnish researchers in the work of the IPCC started to increase. During the subsequent programs, the initial optimism about future crop production conditions changed into an awareness of the threats represented by climate change. Diversity of production and breeding of heat and flooding tolerant, disease resistant and nutrient-use efficient crop varieties were identified as being crucial for adaptation of agriculture. Efficient water management, measures to limit nutrient leaching and timely control of pests and pathogens are also crucial adaptation measures. Carbon storage in soils and biomass and reduced use of organic fields are suggested to be mitigation measures. By 2019, the awareness of the threats of climate change prompted citizens worldwide to demand action, and government programs have begun to include policies addressing reduction of greenhouse gas emissions

    Maatalous ja ilmastonmuutos Satakunnassa

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    vokKATMA

    Viljely muuttuvassa ilmastossa : miten peltoviljely sopeutetaan onnistuneesti

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    Att odla i förändrat klimat : hur åkerbruket kan anpassas framgångsrikt

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    Mitä tarkoittaa bioenergian kestävyys

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    Tavanomaiseen tuotantoon jalostetut kasvilajikkeet luomussa?

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    Adaptation measures of Finnish agriculture to climate change

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    MTT Agrifood Research Finland is to launch in 2006-2007 a new project aimed at stimulating measures to adapt to climate warming in the North. The program will consist of different projects carried out together with both national and international partners, and funded by several organizations

    Field biomass as global energy source

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    Current (1997–2006) and future (2050) global field biomass bioenergy potential was estimated based on FAO (2009) production statistics and estimations of climate change impacts on agriculture according to emission scenario B1 of IPCC. The annual energy potential of raw biomass obtained from crop residues and bioenergy crops cultivated in fields set aside from food production is at present 122–133 EJ, 86–93 EJ or 47–50 EJ, when a vegetarian, moderate or affluent diet is followed, respectively. In 2050, with changes in climate and increases in population, field bioenergy production potential could be 101–110 EJ, 57–61 EJ and 44–47 EJ, following equivalent diets. Of the potential field bioenergy production, 39–42 EJ now and 38–41 EJ in 2050 would derive from crop residues. The residue potential depends, however, on local climate, and may be considerably lower than the technically harvestable potential, when soil quality and sustainable development are considered. Arable land could be used for bioenergy crops, particularly in Australia, South and Central America and the USA. If crop production technology was improved in areas where environmental conditions allow more efficient food production, such as the former Soviet Union, large areas in Europe could also produce bioenergy in set aside fields. The realistic potential and sustainability of field bioenergy production are discussed
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