289 research outputs found

    Poster: Researchers Say the Darndest Things: Using Semi-structured Interviews to Uncover the Unique Information Behaviors of Basic Sciences Researchers in an Academic Health Center

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    Laura discusses the work she and her colleagues did in a qualitative study of semi-structured interviews examining the unique, information-seeking characteristics of basic sciences researchers. The team\u27s ultimate goal was to then design a suite of library services that would better meet these researchers\u27 needs

    Access to Mobile Resources: How Does It Affect the Clerkship Experience?

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    Objectives: To evaluate the perceived benefits of access to library-licensed mobile clinical decision support resources in clinical medical education. Methods: A cohort of medical students was surveyed midway through the clerkship year. Dana Medical Library offered instruction on clinical mobile resources at the beginning of the year. Students were offered a subject guide and assistance with authentication. Assessment methods included web analytics measuring the utility of the subject guide and a survey. Survey questions gathered data on access to mobile devices, relevance of instruction, use of library-licensed mobile resources, and benefits and barriers to their use in the clinical setting. Students were also asked whether access to mobile resources facilitated comparable educational experiences across clerkship sites. Results: The survey was sent to all 111 students from the University of Vermont College of Medicine class of 2014; 31 completed the survey, with a completion rate of 28%. All respondents owned a mobile device, despite efforts to recruit both users and non-users. Nearly 75% of respondents reported using an iPhone. About 90% of respondents brought their mobile device on rotation. Generally, the wireless access at each clerkship site was rated good or excellent. Of the 60% of respondents who attended the instruction session on mobile resources, 94% found the class helpful. Half of the respondents looked at the Mobile Apps subject guide; 70% of those who did found it helpful. A significant increase in page views was reflected in subject guide usage statistics immediately following the instruction session. Approximately 25% of respondents sought out individual assistance at the library. Conclusions: Respondents suggested improvements to library instruction such as distributing access codes during the class and demonstrating installation of an app. A large number of students did not seek additional assistance from the library, citing they did not have any questions. While that may be because they found the subject guide and/or class sufficiently helpful, a significant number of respondents indicated they were unaware of the subject guide. This suggests a need for further promotion and marketing efforts. Researchers were surprised that nonlibrary licensed apps (ePocrates or Medscape) were valued over resources such as DynaMed, and that the most common barrier cited was not having access to appropriate apps. Finally, almost all of the participants who reported taking a mobile device on a rotation agreed it facilitated access to clinical information and improved the clerkship experience

    Implementing the information prescription protocol in a family medicine practice: a case study.

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    QUESTION: Can an information prescription protocol be successfully integrated into a family medicine practice seeking to enhance patient education and self-management? SETTING: Milton Family Practice, an outpatient clinic and resident teaching site of the University of Vermont and Fletcher Allen Health Care, is located in a semirural area fifteen miles from main campus. OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to increase physicians\u27 knowledge and use of information prescriptions, sustain integration of information prescription use, and increase physicians\u27 ability to provide patient education information. METHODS: Methods used were promotion of the National Library of Medicine\u27s Information Rx, physician instruction, installation of patient and provider workstations, and a collaborative approach to practice integration. MAIN RESULTS: A post-intervention survey showed increased physician knowledge and use of the Information Rx protocol. Support procedures were integrated at the practice. CONCLUSIONS: Sustainable integration of Information Rx in a primary care clinic requires not only promotion and education, but also attention to clinic organization and procedures

    Library Support Of Mobile Resources During Clinical Clerkships

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    In response to frequent use of mobile devices among medical students, Dana Medical Library at the University of Vermont provided mobile resource support to medical students preparing for clerkships. The librarians offered group instruction, individual assistance, and an online subject guide. These activities were assessed through evaluations, web statistics, and a survey. Survey questions gathered data on access to mobile devices, use of library-licensed mobile resources, and benefits and barriers to use in the clinical setting. The majority of survey respondents believed access to mobile resources improved their clerkship experience and contributed to comparable educational experiences across clerkship sites. Researchers found that library support impacted student perception of the value of mobile resources in the clerkship experience

    How We Met Our Data Librarian: Designing, Recruiting, and Implementing a New Position

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    Strategic support for a range of data management needs has emerged as a campus-level priority at UVM, as at many other colleges and universities. In Spring 2017, the UVM Libraries reconfigured the vacant position of “Science Librarian” as “Science and Data Librarian” with new responsibilities for supporting data management. This presentation will describe a case study of how the UVM Libraries aligned these responsibilities with campus needs and initiatives; what we learned about data librarianship from the recruitment process; and the opportunities for an incoming librarian shaping the course of new library services

    Recruit Don\u27t Search: Using Inclusive Strengths-Based Processes in Hiring

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    During the 2020-2021 academic year, our organization undertook a strategic effort to improve our diversity, equity, and inclusion practices with the goal of creating a more diverse organization. Paramount in this effort was the development of a set of best practices to be used by our institution to ensure that our hiring practices promote diversity, equity, and inclusion. This poster will detail the processes we undertook to fundamentally rethink hiring and share best practices that we developed so that other institutions can apply these same principles. Attendees will be able to describe how a strengths-based mindset and an interview process that centers the needs of candidates can result in a stronger and more diverse applicant pool. Attendees will be able to give examples of best practices that could be used for inclusive recruiting and support diversity and equity. After attending, attendees will be able to create elements of a strengths-based hiring process that could be implemented at their own institutions

    Evidence of novel finescale structural variation at autism spectrum disorder candidate loci

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    Background: Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) represent a group of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by a core set of social-communicative and behavioral impairments. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, acting primarily via the GABA receptors (GABR). Multiple lines of evidence, including altered GABA and GABA receptor expression in autistic patients, indicate that the GABAergic system may be involved in the etiology of autism. Methods: As copy number variations (CNVs), particularly rare and de novo CNVs, have now been implicated in ASD risk, we examined the GABA receptors and genes in related pathways for structural variation that may be associated with autism. We further extended our candidate gene set to include 19 genes and regions that had either been directly implicated in the autism literature or were directly related (via function or ancestry) to these primary candidates. For the high resolution CNV screen we employed custom-designed 244 k comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays. Collectively, our probes spanned a total of 11 Mb of GABA-related and additional candidate regions with a density of approximately one probe every 200 nucleotides, allowing a theoretical resolution for detection of CNVs of approximately 1 kb or greater on average. One hundred and sixty-eight autism cases and 149 control individuals were screened for structural variants. Prioritized CNV events were confirmed using quantitative PCR, and confirmed loci were evaluated on an additional set of 170 cases and 170 control individuals that were not included in the original discovery set. Loci that remained interesting were subsequently screened via quantitative PCR on an additional set of 755 cases and 1,809 unaffected family members. Results: Results include rare deletions in autistic individuals at JAKMIP1, NRXN1, Neuroligin4Y, OXTR, and ABAT. Common insertion/deletion polymorphisms were detected at several loci, including GABBR2 and NRXN3. Overall, statistically significant enrichment in affected vs. unaffected individuals was observed for NRXN1 deletions. Conclusions: These results provide additional support for the role of rare structural variation in ASD

    Copy Number Variants in Extended Autism Spectrum Disorder Families Reveal Candidates Potentially Involved in Autism Risk

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    Copy number variations (CNVs) are a major cause of genetic disruption in the human genome with far more nucleotides being altered by duplications and deletions than by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In the multifaceted etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), CNVs appear to contribute significantly to our understanding of the pathogenesis of this complex disease. A unique resource of 42 extended ASD families was genotyped for over 1 million SNPs to detect CNVs that may contribute to ASD susceptibility. Each family has at least one avuncular or cousin pair with ASD. Families were then evaluated for co-segregation of CNVs in ASD patients. We identified a total of five deletions and seven duplications in eleven families that co-segregated with ASD. Two of the CNVs overlap with regions on 7p21.3 and 15q24.1 that have been previously reported in ASD individuals and two additional CNVs on 3p26.3 and 12q24.32 occur near regions associated with schizophrenia. These findings provide further evidence for the involvement of ICA1 and NXPH1 on 7p21.3 in ASD susceptibility and highlight novel ASD candidates, including CHL1, FGFBP3 and POUF41. These studies highlight the power of using extended families for gene discovery in traits with a complex etiology

    Linkage analyses in Caribbean Hispanic families identify novel loci associated with familial late-onset Alzheimer's disease

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    INTRODUCTION: We performed linkage analyses in Caribbean Hispanic families with multiple late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) cases to identify regions that may contain disease causative variants. METHODS: We selected 67 LOAD families to perform genome-wide linkage scan. Analysis of the linked regions was repeated using the entire sample of 282 families. Validated chromosomal regions were analyzed using joint linkage and association. RESULTS: We identified 26 regions linked to LOAD (HLOD ≥3.6). We validated 13 of the regions (HLOD ≥2.5) using the entire family sample. The strongest signal was at 11q12.3 (rs2232932: HLODmax = 4.7, Pjoint = 6.6 × 10(-6)), a locus located ∼2 Mb upstream of the membrane-spanning 4A gene cluster. We additionally identified a locus at 7p14.3 (rs10255835: HLODmax = 4.9, Pjoint = 1.2 × 10(-5)), a region harboring genes associated with the nervous system (GARS, GHRHR, and NEUROD6). DISCUSSION: Future sequencing efforts should focus on these regions because they may harbor familial LOAD causative mutations

    Isolation in Natural Host Cell Lines of Wolbachia Strains wPip from the Mosquito Culex pipiens and wPap from the Sand Fly Phlebotomus papatasi

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    Endosymbiotic intracellular bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are harboured by many species of invertebrates. They display a wide range of developmental, metabolic and nutritional interactions with their hosts and may impact the transmission of arboviruses and protozoan parasites. Wolbachia have occasionally been isolated during insect cell line generation. Here, we report the isolation of two strains of Wolbachia, wPip and wPap, during cell line generation from their respective hosts, the mosquito Culex pipiens and the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi. wPip was pathogenic for both new C. pipiens cell lines, CPE/LULS50 and CLP/LULS56, requiring tetracycline treatment to rescue the lines. In contrast, wPap was tolerated by the P. papatasi cell line PPL/LULS49, although tetracycline treatment was applied to generate a Wolbachia-free subline. Both Wolbachia strains were infective for a panel of heterologous insect and tick cell lines, including two novel lines generated from the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis, LLE/LULS45 and LLL/LULS52. In all cases, wPip was more pathogenic for the host cells than wPap. These newly isolated Wolbachia strains, and the novel mosquito and sand fly cell lines reported here, will add to the resources available for research on host–endosymbiont relationships, as well as on C. pipiens, P. papatasi, L. longipalpis and the pathogens that they transmi
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