336 research outputs found

    Comparative Performance of a Powerplus Vane-type Supercharger and an N.A.C.A. Roots-type Supercharger

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    This report presents the results of tests of a Power plus supercharger and a comparison of its performance with the performance previously obtained with an N.A.C.A. Roots-type supercharger. The Powerplus supercharger is a positive displacement blower of the vane type having mechanically operated vanes, the movement of which is controlled by slots and eccentrics. The supercharger was tested at a range of pressure differences from 0 to 15 inches of mercury and at speeds from 500 to 2,500 r.p.m. The pressure difference across the supercharger was obtained by throttling the intake of a depression tank which was interposed in the air duct between the supercharger and the Durley orifice box used for measuring the air. The results of these tests show that at low pressure differences and at all speeds the power required by the Powerplus supercharger to compress a definite quantity of air per second is considerably higher than that required by the Roots. At pressure differences from 10 to 14 inches of mercury and at speeds over 2,000 r.p.m. the power requirements of the two superchargers are practically the same. At a pressure difference of 15 inches of mercury or greater and at a speed of 2,500 r.p.m. or greater the performance of the Powerplus supercharger is slightly better than that of the Roots. Because the Powerplus supercharger cannot be operated at a speed greater than 3,000 r.p.m. as compared with 7,000 r.p.m. for the Roots, its capacity is approximately one-half that of the Roots for the same bulk. The Powerplus supercharger is more complicated and less reliable than the Roots supercharger

    Performance of Air-cooled Engine Cylinders Using Blower Cooling

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    An investigation was made to obtain information on the minimum quantity of air and power required to cool conventional air cooled cylinders at various operating conditions when using a blower. The results of these tests show that the minimum power required for satisfactory cooling with an overall blower efficiency of 100 percent varied from 2 to 6 percent of the engine power depending on the operating conditions. The shape of the jacket had a large effect on the cylinder temperatures. Increasing the air speed over the front of the cylinder by keeping the greater part of the circumference of the cylinder covered by the jacket reduced the temperatures over the entire cylinder

    The Performance of a Depalma Roots-type Supercharger

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    The results of tests made to determine the performance of a DePalma-Roots supercharger are presented. The performance of the DePalma supercharger with atmospheric pressure at the discharge was compared with that of a hypothetical NACA Roots-type supercharger of the same displacement. The tests were conducted at speeds from 1,000 to 6,000 r.p.m. and at pressure differences from 0 to 15 inches of mercury. The variation in clearance between the impeller tips and the impeller housing was determined for the DePalma supercharger at a speed of 2,000 r.p.m. and for the NACA supercharger at speeds from 500 to 3,000 r.p.m. with the pressure differences for each supercharger varying form 0 to 15 inches of mercury. The results indicate that, if warping and growing of the metals of the case and impellers are neglected, the most uniform clearances can probably be maintained for all operating conditions when the case and impellers are constructed of metals that have the same coefficient of expansion. The results also show that the discharge and intake openings of this model of the DePalma supercharger are too small, which lowers the volumetric efficiency and impairs the performance at all speeds and pressure differences. At high pressure difference the volumetric efficiency of the DePalma supercharger is greater when the discharge pressure surpasses atmospheric pressure than when the discharge pressure is atmospheric

    The Effect on Airplane Performance of the Factors That Must Be Considered in Applying Low-Drag Cowling to Radial Engines

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    This report presents the results of flight tests with three different airplanes using several types of low-drag cowling for radial air-cooled engines. The greater part of the tests were made with a Curtiss XF7Cc-1 (Sea Hawk) with a 410 horsepower. Wasp engine, using three fuselage nose shapes and six types of outer cowling. The six cowlings were: a narrow ring, a wide ring, a wide cowling similar in the original NACA cowling, a thick ring incorporating an exhaust collector, a single-surface cowling shaped like the outer surface of the exhaust-collector cowling, and polygon-ring cowling, of which the angle of the straight sections with the thrust line could be varied over a wide range

    The Effect of Increased Cooling Surface on Performance of Aircraft-Engine Cylinders as Shown by Tests of the NACA Cylinder

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    A method of constructing fins of nearly optimum proportions has been developed by the NACA to the point where a cylinder has been manufactured and tested. Data were obtained on cylinder temperature for a wide range of inlet-manifold pressures, engine speeds, and cooling-pressure differences

    Universal relationship between the penetration depth and the normal-state conductivity in YBaCuO

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    The absolute values of the conductivity in the normal state sigma_n and of the low temperature penetration depths lambda(0) were measured for a number of different samples of the YBaCuO family. We found a striking correlation between sigma_n and 1/lambda^2, regardless of doping, oxygen reduction or defects, thus providing a simple method to predict the superconducting penetration depth and to have an estimate of the sample quality by measuring the normal-state conductivity.Comment: 7 pages, 1 figure, Europhys. Lett., accepte

    Bound States and Critical Behavior of the Yukawa Potential

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    We investigate the bound states of the Yukawa potential V(r)=λexp(αr)/rV(r)=-\lambda \exp(-\alpha r)/ r, using different algorithms: solving the Schr\"odinger equation numerically and our Monte Carlo Hamiltonian approach. There is a critical α=αC\alpha=\alpha_C, above which no bound state exists. We study the relation between αC\alpha_C and λ\lambda for various angular momentum quantum number ll, and find in atomic units, αC(l)=λ[A1exp(l/B1)+A2exp(l/B2)]\alpha_{C}(l)= \lambda [A_{1} \exp(-l/ B_{1})+ A_{2} \exp(-l/ B_{2})], with A1=1.020(18)A_1=1.020(18), B1=0.443(14)B_1=0.443(14), A2=0.170(17)A_2=0.170(17), and B2=2.490(180)B_2=2.490(180).Comment: 15 pages, 12 figures, 5 tables. Version to appear in Sciences in China
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