65 research outputs found

    What Skills do Somali Refugees Bring With Them?

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    To get a better idea of why refugees have difficulties getting employment, we interviewed 90 Somali (35 men, 55 women) about their employment histories prior to resettlement in New Zealand and their experiences of employment in New Zealand. Close investigation of employment histories showed that most had numerous skills and that a large number had previously run their own businesses (mostly import/export). However, we that found several properties of their prior skills did not transfer well to their current setting due to language, cultural, and environmental issues. In particular, previous business owners relied heavily on informal language use to influence customers and sellers; many relied on informal social networking over different countries; many depended heavily on informal negotiation; they had trade routes over land rather than sea; they traded goods specific to the region; they ran informal economies on the side; and businesses had few government rules and legal requirements to meet. We make some new suggestions that might help overcome these more subtle difficulties and form the basis for future research interventions

    What Skills do Somali Refugees Bring With Them?

    Get PDF
    To get a better idea of why refugees have difficulties getting employment, we interviewed 90 Somali (35 men, 55 women) about their employment histories prior to resettlement in New Zealand and their experiences of employment in New Zealand. Close investigation of employment histories showed that most had numerous skills and that a large number had previously run their own businesses (mostly import/export). However, we that found several properties of their prior skills did not transfer well to their current setting due to language, cultural, and environmental issues. In particular, previous business owners relied heavily on informal language use to influence customers and sellers; many relied on informal social networking over different countries; many depended heavily on informal negotiation; they had trade routes over land rather than sea; they traded goods specific to the region; they ran informal economies on the side; and businesses had few government rules and legal requirements to meet. We make some new suggestions that might help overcome these more subtle difficulties and form the basis for future research interventions

    An investigation of culturally competent terminology in healthcare policy finds ambiguity and lack of definition

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    © 2013 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2013 Public Health Association of Australia Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial-NoDerivs License (CC BY NC ND).Objective : This research explored how the concept of cultural competence was represented and expressed through health policies that were intended to improve the quality and efficacy of healthcare provided to families from culturally marginalised communities, particularly women and children with refugee backgrounds. Method : A critical document analysis was conducted of policies that inform healthcare for families from culturally marginalised communities in two local government areas in South Australia. Results : The analysis identified two major themes: lack of, or inconsistent, definitions of ‘culture’ and ‘cultural competency’ and related terms; and the paradoxical use of language to determine care. Conclusions : Cultural competence within health services has been identified as an important factor that can improve the health outcomes for families from marginalised communities. However, inconsistency in definitions, understanding and implementation of cultural competence in health practice makes it difficult to implement care using these frameworks. Implications : Clearly defined pathways are necessary from health policy to inform culturally competent service delivery. The capacity for policy directives to effectively circumvent the potential deleterious outcomes of culturally incompetent services is only possible when that policy provides clear definitions and instructions. Consultation and partnership are necessary to develop effective definitions and processes relating to cultural competence

    Who Are the Most Unemployed People in New Zealand and What Can We Do About it?

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    This paper presents an analysis of data for the top ten most unemployed groups by ethnicity and birthplace who were living in New Zealand at the 2001 Census. These groups are either from refugee backgrounds, are highly visible groups, or come from strong extended family networks. These data are supplemented with information from the New Zealand Immigration Service's Longitudinal Immigration Pilot Survey and Refugee Voices Project as well as qualitative data from other research in New Zealand. Overall, the findings from this assessment of the census and survey data have significant implications for the development and provision of employment intervention programmes in New Zealand

    Sustainability of Remote Communities: Population Size and Youth Dynamics

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    Fieldwork in two remote Aboriginal communities in arid South Australia found diverse considerations for sustainability. For Nepabunna in the Flinders Ranges, the main resource and environmental concerns were less problematic than social issues such as population mobility and the small number of young people remaining in the community. Pukatja in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands, on the other hand, contends with serious resource and environmental issues. Both communities had sustainability issues for young people that looked similar but which were very different. For Nepabunna, because the number of young people has decreased, there have been flow-on effects of services being threatened, a lack of companionship for those remaining, and concern about future leaders. Pukatja has many young people but without access to better secondary education and employment, boredom is reported to have detrimental effects. All these issues have implications for policy formulation, in particular, the lack of contextualising the evidence for policy has meant that solutions to sustainability issues have not worked. For Nepabunna, policy that is determined by resident population size fails to recognise a larger dependent community, not necessarily resident. Government support for involving relatives and the wider community — who are not necessarily resident in the community — is one possible way to promote community sustainability despite population fluctuations. The real problem, then, is that government laws and policy are typically formulated as general or abstract propositions designed to be implemented in the same way over very diverse contexts. A sustainable, appropriate policy system needs to allow for locally created, managed and implemented policies to ensure rapid and context-driven adaptations to whatever contingencies occur. Our research found that a context driven policy process is more appropriate for diverse, small, remote communities
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