34 research outputs found

    Let them speak for themselves: Improving adolescent self-report rate on pre-visit screening

    Get PDF
    Background Adolescent pre-visit screening on patient-generated health data is a common and efficient practice to guide clinical decision making. However, proxy informants (e.g., parents or caregivers) often complete these forms, which may lead to incorrect information or lack of confidentiality. Our objective was to improve the adolescent self-report rate on pre-visit screening. Methods We conducted an interventional study using an interrupted time-series design to compare adolescent self-report rates (percent of adolescents ages 12-18 years completing their own pre-visit screening) over 16 months in general pediatric ambulatory clinics. We collected data using a computerized clinical decision support system with waiting room electronic tablet screening. Pre-intervention rates were low, and we created and implemented two electronic workflow alerts, one each to the patient/caregiver and clinical staff, reminding them that the adolescent should answer the questions independently. We included the first encounter from each adolescent and evaluated changes in adolescent self-reporting between pre- and post-intervention periods using interrupted time series analysis. Results Patients or caregivers completed 2,670 qualifying pre-visit screenings across 19 pre-intervention, 7 intervention, and 44 post-intervention weeks. Self-reporting by younger adolescents nearly doubled with a significant increase of 19.3 percentage points (CI 9.1-29.5) from the baseline 20.5%. Among older adolescents, the stable baseline rate of 53.6% increased by 9.2 absolute percentage points (CI -7.0-25.3). There were no significant pre- or post-intervention secular trends. Conclusions Two automated alerts directing clinic personnel and families to have adolescents self-report significantly and sustainably improved younger adolescent self-reporting on electronic patient-generated health data instruments

    A six-year repeated evaluation of computerized clinical decision support system user acceptability

    Get PDF
    OBJECTIVE: Long-term acceptability among computerized clinical decision support system (CDSS) users in pediatrics is unknown. We examine user acceptance patterns over six years of our continuous computerized CDSS integration and updates. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Users of Child Health Improvement through Computer Automation (CHICA), a CDSS integrated into clinical workflows and used in several urban pediatric community clinics, completed annual surveys including 11 questions covering user acceptability. We compared responses across years within a single healthcare system and between two healthcare systems. We used logistic regression to assess the odds of a favorable response to each question by survey year, clinic role, part-time status, and frequency of CHICA use. RESULTS: Data came from 380 completed surveys between 2011 and 2016. Responses were significantly more favorable for all but one measure by 2016 (OR range 2.90-12.17, all p‚ÄĮ<‚ÄĮ0.01). Increasing system maturity was associated with improved perceived function of CHICA (OR range 4.24-7.58, p‚ÄĮ<‚ÄĮ0.03). User familiarity was positively associated with perceived CDSS function (OR range 3.44-8.17, p‚ÄĮ<‚ÄĮ0.05) and usability (OR range 9.71-15.89, p‚ÄĮ<‚ÄĮ0.01) opinions. CONCLUSION: We present a long-term, repeated follow-up of user acceptability of a CDSS. Favorable opinions of the CDSS were more likely in frequent users, physicians and advanced practitioners, and full-time workers. CHICA acceptability increased as it matured and users become more familiar with it. System quality improvement, user support, and patience are important in achieving wide-ranging, sustainable acceptance of CDSS

    Transforming primary medical research knowledge into clinical decision

    Get PDF
    While the utility of computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) for multiple select clinical domains has been clearly demonstrated, much less is known about the full breadth of domains to which CCDS approaches could be productively applied. To explore the applicability of CCDS to general medical knowledge, we sampled a total of 500 primary research articles from 4 high-impact medical journals. Employing rule-based templates, we created high-level CCDS rules for 72% (361/500) of primary medical research articles. We subsequently identified data sources needed to implement those rules. Ourfindings suggest that CCDS approaches, perhaps in the form of non-interruptive infobuttons, could be much more broadly applied. In addition, our analytic methods appear to provide a means of prioritizing and quantitating the relative utility of available data sources for purposes of CCDS

    Development, validation, and proof-of-concept implementation of a two-year risk prediction model for undiagnosed atrial fibrillation using common electronic health data (UNAFIED)

    Get PDF
    Background: Many patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) remain undiagnosed despite availability of interventions to reduce stroke risk. Predictive models to date are limited by data requirements and theoretical usage. We aimed to develop a model for predicting the 2-year probability of AF diagnosis and implement it as proof-of-concept (POC) in a production electronic health record (EHR). Methods: We used a nested case-control design using data from the Indiana Network for Patient Care. The development cohort came from 2016 to 2017 (outcome period) and 2014 to 2015 (baseline). A separate validation cohort used outcome and baseline periods shifted 2 years before respective development cohort times. Machine learning approaches were used to build predictive model. Patients ‚Č• 18 years, later restricted to age ‚Č• 40 years, with at least two encounters and no AF during baseline, were included. In the 6-week EHR prospective pilot, the model was silently implemented in the production system at a large safety-net urban hospital. Three new and two previous logistic regression models were evaluated using receiver-operating characteristics. Number, characteristics, and CHA2DS2-VASc scores of patients identified by the model in the pilot are presented. Results: After restricting age to ‚Č• 40 years, 31,474 AF cases (mean age, 71.5 years; female 49%) and 22,078 controls (mean age, 59.5 years; female 61%) comprised the development cohort. A 10-variable model using age, acute heart disease, albumin, body mass index, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, gender, heart failure, insurance, kidney disease, and shock yielded the best performance (C-statistic, 0.80 [95% CI 0.79-0.80]). The model performed well in the validation cohort (C-statistic, 0.81 [95% CI 0.8-0.81]). In the EHR pilot, 7916/22,272 (35.5%; mean age, 66 years; female 50%) were identified as higher risk for AF; 5582 (70%) had CHA2DS2-VASc score ‚Č• 2. Conclusions: Using variables commonly available in the EHR, we created a predictive model to identify 2-year risk of developing AF in those previously without diagnosed AF. Successful POC implementation of the model in an EHR provided a practical strategy to identify patients who may benefit from interventions to reduce their stroke risk

    How can healthcare professionals provide guidance and support to parents of adolescents? Results from a primary care-based study

    Get PDF
    Background: This study explored the rewards and difficulties of raising an adolescent and investigated parents' level of interest in receiving guidance from healthcare providers on parenting and adolescent health topics. Additionally, this study investigated whether parents were interested in parenting programs in primary care and explored methods in which parents want to receive guidance. Methods: Parents of adolescents (ages 12-18) who attended an outpatient pediatric clinic with their adolescent were contacted by telephone and completed a short telephone survey. Parents were asked open-ended questions regarding the rewards and difficulties of parenting and rated how important it was to receive guidance from a healthcare provider on certain parenting and health topics. Additionally, parents reported their level of interest in a parenting program in primary care and rated how they would like to receive guidance. Results: Our final sample included 104 parents, 87% of whom were interested in a parenting program within primary care. A variety of parenting rewards and difficulties were associated with raising an adolescent. From the list of parenting topics, communication was rated very important to receive guidance on (65%), followed by conflict management (50%). Of health topics, parents were primarily interested in receiving guidance on sex (77%), mental health (75%), and alcohol and drugs (74%). Parents in the study wanted to receive guidance from a pediatrician or through written literature. Conclusions: The current study finds that parents identify several rewarding and difficult aspects associated with raising an adolescent and are open to receiving guidance on a range of parenting topics in a variety of formats through primary care settings. Incorporating such education into healthcare visits could improve parents' knowledge. Healthcare providers are encouraged to consider how best to provide parenting support during this important developmental time period

    Caregiver Comfort in Adolescents Independently Completing Screening Tablet-Based Questionnaires at Primary Care Visits

    Get PDF
    Objectives The objective of this study was to assess caregiver comfort regarding adolescent completion of computerized health screening questionnaires created for adolescents. Design We conducted a mixed method, cross-sectional survey of caregivers of adolescent patients (n=104) ages 12‚Äď18 years that had a medical visit between June and August of 2017. Topics assessed included who completed the questionnaire, caregiver comfort and concern regarding questionnaire data, and caregiver reasons for involvement in completing the questionnaire. A one-way ANOVA was used to compare age of the adolescent and caregiver involvement in the questionnaire. Results The majority of adolescents (64%) reported independent completion of the questionnaire. Thirteen percent of caregivers completed the questionnaire with no involvement of the adolescent and 23% reported that caregivers and adolescents completed the questionnaire in tandem. The majority of caregivers (84%) were comfortable with adolescents completing the questionnaire. A variety of reasons were identified for caregivers completing the questionnaire (time constraints, 22%; adolescent requested caregiver help, 19%; caregiver desired to answer questions, 14%; caregiver did not realize that the questionnaire was intended for the adolescent, 11%; caregiver believed that the adolescent was too young to respond alone, 11%. Caregiver comfort with adolescent completing the questionnaire increase with age. Conclusion We found the reason most caregivers gave for completing the questionnaires were related to clinic processes (e.g. time constraints) Caregivers were more likely to complete the questionnaire with younger adolescents. Thus, pediatricians should consider how to best prepare families for initial questionnaires in primary care

    Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at ‚ąös=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Get PDF
    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20.3 fb‚ąí1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of ‚ąös=8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in the observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W‚Ä≤, and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. W‚Ä≤ bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level

    Search for long-lived charginos based on a disappearing-track signature in pp collisions at s ‚ąö =13 s=13 TeV with the ATLAS detector