351 research outputs found

    The Future of International Criminal Justice

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    On March 19, 2008, the Honorable Richard Goldstone, former justice on the Constitutional Court of South Africa, delivered the Georgetown Law Center’s twenty-eithth Annual Philip A. Hart Memorial Lecture: The Future of International Criminal Justice. Goldstone graduated from the University of the Witwatersrand with a BA LLB cum laude in 1962. After graduating, he practiced as an advocate at the Johannesburg Bar. In 1976 he was appointed senior counsel and in 1980 was made a judge of the Transvaal Supreme Court. In 1989 he was appointed to the Appellate Division. From 1991 to 1994 he served as the chairperson of the Commission of Inquiry Regarding Public Violence and Intimidation, which came to be known as the Goldstone Commission. He served as a judge of the Constitutional Court of South Africa from July 1994 to October 2003. From 15 August 1994 to September 1996 he served as the chief prosecutor of the United Nations\u27 International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. From August 1999 until December 2001 he was the chairperson of the International Independent Inquiry on Kosovo. In December 2001 he was appointed the co-chairperson of the International Task Force on Terrorism, which was established by the International Bar Association. In April 2004 the secretary-general of the United Nations appointed Goldstone to the independent committee to investigate the Iraqi oil-for-food program (the Volcker Committee). In October 2007 he was appointed by the Registrars of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda to chair an Advisory Committee on the Archiving of the Documents and Records of the two tribunals

    Introduction

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    This special issue of the Fordham International Law Journal contains seven outstanding articles by jurists from seven countries on three continents. The articles have a common thread in highlighting the necessity for respect of human rights and the human dignity that they are designed to protect. They also demonstrate the significant advances made since the end of World War II of international human rights law. In an age of terrorism there is an inevitable tension between measures designed to protect the lives of innocent civilians and their fundamental civil liberties

    Introduction

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    Given the violence in Darfur and the ensuing international reaction, the Fordham International Law Journal decided to publish a special issue on Darfur. It is timely in light of the continuing violence in the Darfur region. This article serves as the Introduction to the special issue

    Exposing Human Rights Abuses--A Help or Hindrance to Reconciliation

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    Despite the advent of the new world order, international human rights violations remain a widespread problem. The propensities for such abuses are seen most recently through the widespread violence and genocide encountered in Yugoslavia and Rwanda. In an effort to address such abuses, the United Nations established the International War Crimes Tribunal for the Balkan States and Rwanda. The chief goals of the Tribunal are to collect data and try those accused of war crimes. Justice Richard Goldstone, the Tobriner lecturer, is the Prosecutor of the Tribunal. In his lecture, Justice Goldstone describes how truth commissions have been used to address human rights violations throughout this past century. Justice Goldstone identifies where these truth commissions have succeeded in bringing about reconciliation, and where they have failed. Justice Goldstone then uses this historic backdrop to explain how the International War Crimes Tribunals was designed to function

    Combating Terrorism: Zero Tolerance for Torture

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    International Human Rights and Criminal Justice in the First Decade of the 21st Century

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    US Antagonism Toward the International Rule of Law: The View of a Concerned “Outsider”

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    Modern technology contracts the world, and as borders become more porous, an international rule of law becomes more crucial. The United States quickly and adroitly put together an international coalition to fight terrorism. In doing so, it recognized the inability of even the most powerful nations to fight this scourge alone. We need to make international policing more efficient—the transfer of evidence across borders, extradition laws, prosecuting money laundering, to mention some of the obvious areas of international policing. An international rule of law must surely reflect the values for which this country has always fought—fairness, justice and, most importantly, the recognition and protection of human dignity
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