51 research outputs found

    Perspectives on the dynamics of third spaces

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    While coworking spaces (CSs) were traditionally viewed as a necessity for self-employed workers and freelancers, we outline how different users have also adopted the concept, even more so during the pandemic. The range of users has now expanded with employees from all sorts of companies who need to balance remote working with their private lives at home. We indicate avenues for future growth, in particular when the use of a CS becomes a lifestyle choice, and present paths for future research on CS users

    Coworkers in the Netherlands during the COVID-19 pandemic

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    The literature on coworking spaces (CSs) often neglects the link between the motives for using coworking in general and the choice of a specific CS. Moreover, their relationship with regional attitudes in different geographical and economic landscapes is rarely studied. We attempt to fill this gap by investigating users’ motives and preferences in the socioeconomic landscape of the Netherlands during the pandemic. The results from semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire answered by 47 CS users show trends that differ partially from those highlighted in the literature thus far. In particular, Dutch coworkers want to find a productive workplace outside home, and they tend to focus strongly on the CS layout and design, while their interest in professional networking is less pronounced. These results can be interpreted as a manifestation of new needs emerging during the pandemic, which could also persist in the reorganization of workplaces following the pandemic

    The heterogeneous role of energy policies in the energy transition of Asia-Pacific emerging economies

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    The achievement of sustainable energy systems requires well-designed energy policies, particularly targeted strategies to plan the direction of energy development, regulations monitored and executed through credible authorities and laws enforced by the judicial system for the enhancement of actions and national targets. The Asia–Pacific region (APAC), responsible for more than half of global energy consumption, has enacted a large number of energy policies over the past two decades, but progress on the energy transition remains slow. This study focuses on the aggregate effect of energy policies on the progress towards sustainable targets in 42 emerging economies from 2000 to 2017. We find that energy policies have contributed to improving access to electricity (3.0%), access to clean cooking (3.8%), energy efficiency (1.4%) and renewable electricity capacity (6.9%), respectively. Among different types of energy policy (strategies, laws and regulations), strategies have greater impacts on advancing electrification, clean cooking and renewable electricity capacity than laws and regulations, whereas the laws are more effective for achieving energy efficiency

    Directionality of transitions in space: Diverging trajectories of electric mobility and autonomous driving in urban and rural settlement structures

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    How does the spatial context shape early innovation trajectories and how will this influence the directionality of transitions? We elaborate these questions for the case of transitions in personal mobility, focusing on emerging trajectories of electric vehicles and autonomous driving. We analyze how the dynamics depend on whether innovation and transition strategies are primarily geared towards urban or rural contexts. In order to identify potentially diverging trajectories, we specify socio-technical regime structures at two levels: the level of service regimes (i.e. rules that relate to specific means of transport, like the car) and the level of the sectoral regime (i.e. rules that regulate the interplay between the different service regimes). We will show that depending on whether the early innovation strategies are oriented at rural or urban contexts, quite different directionalities can result both regarding the technological trajectory of the new service option, but also regarding the overall sector configuration

    Overcoming the harmony fallacy: How values shape the course of innovation systems

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    The technological innovation systems (TIS) framework is one of the dominant perspectives in transitions studies to analyze success conditions and system failures of newly emerging technologies and industries. So far, TIS studies mostly adopted a rather harmonious view on the values of actors and by this were unable to address competition, conflicts and, in particular, battles over diverging directionalities within the system. To empirically assess this potential “harmony fallacy”, we identify values as part of underlying institutional logics of major organizations in the field of modular water technologies in Switzerland by means of 26 expert interviews. We show how logics may condition collaboration patterns and technological preferences. This analysis inspires key conceptual tasks of innovation system analysis, like the identification of system failures, the setting of appropriate system boundaries and the formulation of better policy recommendations

    The Ripple Effect and Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Intra-Urban Housing Prices at the Submarket Level in Shanghai, China

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    The ripple effect of housing price movements between cities has been extensively investigated, but there are relatively few studies on this topic within a metropolitan context, especially at the submarket level. This paper describes the use of ripple effect theory to examine the diffusion process and convergence of intra-urban housing prices at the submarket level in Shanghai, an emerging global city in China. The analysis is based on directed acyclic graphs, local indicators of spatial association time-paths, and a recently developed convergence test. The empirical results of grouping analysis identify 25 submarkets in Shanghai, and the diffusion of housing prices between these submarkets is found to be caused by both geographical and economic proximities. There is also a complex recursive process of price spillovers from high- to low-priced submarkets, and vice versa, which contributes to the spiraling local housing prices. Housing prices diverge across all submarkets, and the whole market can be divided into three convergence clubs. Finally, these convergence clubs have a circular structure with a degree of continuity. This study broadens our knowledge of the price interrelationship among housing submarkets at the intra-urban level. These findings have profound implications for urban planners, policy makers, and local residents

    The Geography of Technology Legitimation: How Multiscalar Institutional Dynamics Matter for Path Creation in Emerging Industries

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    Research in economic geography has recently been challenged to adopt more institutional and multiscalar perspectives on industrial path development. This article contributes to this debate by integrating insights from (evolutionary) economic geography as well as transition and innovation studies into a conceptual framework of how path creation in emerging industries depends on the availability of both knowledge and legitimacy. Unlike the extant literature, we argue here that not only the former but also the latter may substantially depend on nonlocal sources. Conceptually, we distinguish between multiscalar export, attraction, and absorption of legitimacy. Coupled with conventional knowledge indicators, this approach enables us to reconstruct how not only external knowledge sourcing but also multiscalar institutional dynamics contribute to a region or country’s ability to leverage its potential for path creation in an emerging industry. Methodologically, we develop legitimation indicators from a global media database, which was built around the case of modular water technologies. Cross-comparing the evidence from six key countries (India, Israel, Singapore, South Africa, the UK, the US) with differing path creation constellations for this emerging industry, allows us to hypothesize how multiscalar legitimation influences a country’s prospects for creating a radically new industrial path
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