40 research outputs found

    Caching and Auditing in the RPPM Model

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    Crampton and Sellwood recently introduced a variant of relationship-based access control based on the concepts of relationships, paths and principal matching, to which we will refer as the RPPM model. In this paper, we show that the RPPM model can be extended to provide support for caching of authorization decisions and enforcement of separation of duty policies. We show that these extensions are natural and powerful. Indeed, caching provides far greater advantages in RPPM than it does in most other access control models and we are able to support a wide range of separation of duty policies.Comment: Accepted for publication at STM 2014 (without proofs, which are included in this longer version

    Vessel wall MR imaging for the detection of intracranial inflammatory vasculopathies

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    Intracranial vasculopathies are routinely investigated by lumen-based modalities such as magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), computed tomography angiography (CTA), and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). These techniques are useful to analyze the vessel lumen, allowing to detect vessel stenosis or occlusion. However, the primum movins of the disease, i.e., an abnormal thickening of the vessel wall, remains within the arterial wall. The vasculopathy can moreover be present without always narrowing the lumen or modifying its regularity. Hence, there is a need to detect directly and analyze vessel wall abnormalities. Development of 3D high-resolution black blood sequences for intracranial vessel wall MR imaging (VW-MRI) enabled routine clinical applications not only vasculitis, but also of intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD), intracranial dissections, reversible intracranial dissections, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), Moyamoya disease, and intracranial aneurysms. This high-resolution intracranial VW- MRI approach is increasingly used on a clinical basis at many centers to solve diagnostic problems, especially in patients with ischemic stroke or intracranial hemorrhage. An expert consensus Guideline from the American Society of Neuroradiology provides recommendations for clinical implementation of intracranial vessel wall MRI. There are several technical aspects needed to be considered when implementing VW-MRI in intracranial vessels, including flow suppression, both in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this article, we review the technical aspects of VW-MRI, and recommend applications for vascular diseases including non-occlusive intracranial vasculopathies, Moyamoya disease, and identifying culprit plaques. We also give a focus on the utility of VW-MRI for determining stroke etiology in adults and in children and young adults

    Safer in the Clouds (Extended Abstract)

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    We outline the design of a framework for modelling cloud computing systems.The approach is based on a declarative programming model which takes the form of a lambda-calculus enriched with suitable mechanisms to express and enforce application-level security policies governing usages of resources available in the clouds. We will focus on the server side of cloud systems, by adopting a pro-active approach, where explicit security policies regulate server's behaviour.Comment: In Proceedings ICE 2010, arXiv:1010.530

    History-Based Access Control with Local Policies

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    Roadmap consensus on carotid artery plaque imaging and impact on therapy strategies and guidelines: An international, multispecialty, expert review and position statement

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    Current guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in patients with carotid atherosclerosis are based on the quantification of the degree of stenosis and symptom status. Recent publications have demonstrated that plaque morphology and composition, independent of the degree of stenosis, are important in the risk stratification of carotid atherosclerotic disease. This finding raises the question as to whether current guidelines are adequate or if they should be updated with new evidence, including imaging for plaque phenotyping, risk stratification, and clinical decision-making in addition to the degree of stenosis. To further this discussion, this roadmap consensus article defines the limits of luminal imaging and highlights the current evidence supporting the role of plaque imaging. Furthermore, we identify gaps in current knowledge and suggest steps to generate high-quality evidence, to add relevant information to guidelines currently based on the quantification of stenosis

    Roadmap Consensus on Carotid Artery Plaque Imaging and Impact on Therapy Strategies and Guidelines: An International, Multispecialty, Expert Review and Position Statement

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    Current guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in patients with carotid atherosclerosis are based on the quantification of the degree of stenosis and symptom status. Recent publications have demonstrated that plaque morphology and composition, independent of the degree of stenosis, are important in the risk stratification of carotid atherosclerotic disease. This finding raises the question as to whether current guidelines are adequate or if they should be updated with new evidence, including imaging for plaque phenotyping, risk stratification, and clinical decision-making in addition to the degree of stenosis. To further this discussion, this roadmap consensus article defines the limits of luminal imaging and highlights the current evidence supporting the role of plaque imaging. Furthermore, we identify gaps in current knowledge and suggest steps to generate high-quality evidence, to add relevant information to guidelines currently based on the quantification of stenosis.</p

    Microbleeds, Cerebral Hemorrhage, and Functional Outcome After Stroke Thrombolysis: Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

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    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We assessed whether the presence, number, and distribution of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) on pre-intravenous thrombolysis MRI scans of acute ischemic stroke patients are associated with an increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) or poor functional outcome. METHODS: We performed an individual patient data meta-analysis, including prospective and retrospective studies of acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator. Using multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression, we investigated associations of pre-treatment CMB presence, burden (1, 2-4, ‚Č•5, and >10), and presumed pathogenesis (cerebral amyloid angiopathy defined as strictly lobar CMBs and noncerebral amyloid angiopathy) with symptomatic ICH, parenchymal hematoma (within [parenchymal hemorrhage, PH] and remote from the ischemic area [remote parenchymal hemorrhage, PHr]), and poor 3- to 6-month functional outcome (modified Rankin score >2). RESULTS: In 1973 patients from 8 centers, the crude prevalence of CMBs was 526 of 1973 (26.7%). A total of 77 of 1973 (3.9%) patients experienced symptomatic ICH, 210 of 1806 (11.6%) experienced PH, and 56 of 1720 (3.3%) experienced PHr. In adjusted analyses, patients with CMBs (compared with those without CMBs) had increased risk of PH (odds ratio: 1.50; 95% confidence interval: 1.09-2.07; P=0.013) and PHr (odds ratio: 3.04; 95% confidence interval: 1.73-5.35; P10 CMBs independently predicted poor 3- to 6-month outcome (odds ratio: 1.85; 95% confidence interval: 1.10-3.12; P=0.020; and odds ratio: 3.99; 95% confidence interval: 1.55-10.22; P=0.004, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Increasing CMB burden is associated with increased risk of ICH (including PHr) and poor 3- to 6-month functional outcome after intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke

    Adaptive Parallelism for OpenMP Task Parallel Programs

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