52,114 research outputs found

    Reasonable Accommodations on the Bar Exam: Leveling the Playing Field or Providing an Unfair Advantage?

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    If you ask law students what they think about examination accommodations provided to students with disabilities, including learning disabilities, most students will tell you that it is unfair that some students get more time to take an examination. The misconception that accommodations provide an unfair advantage may stem from the fact that not all students understand the Americans with Disabilities Act ( ADA ), its purpose, and the reasons why individuals receive such accommodations. In fact, the ADA has applications beyond the employment context. Specifically, the ADA ensures that students with disabilities who graduate from medical school, law school, and other professional programs cannot be discriminated against in their educational programs and are entitled to nondiscrimination and reasonable accommodation in the licensing process

    The Financial Accounting Standards Board of Derivatives Activity and Disclosure

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    The Mobility Case for Regionalism

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    In the discourse of local government law, the idea that a mobile populace can “vote with its feet” has long served as a justification for devolution and decentralization. Tracing to Charles Tiebout’s seminal work in public finance, the legal-structural prescription that follows is that a diversity of independent and empowered local governments can best satisfy the varied preferences of residents metaphorically shopping for bundles of public services, regulatory environment, and tax burden. This localist paradigm generally presumes that fragmented governments are competing for residents within a given metropolitan area. Contemporary patterns of mobility, however, call into question this foundational assumption. People today move between — and not just within — metropolitan regions, domestically and even internationally. This is particularly so for a subset of residents — high human-capital knowledge workers and the so-called “creative class” — that is prominently coveted in this interregional competition. These modern mobile residents tend to evaluate the policy bundles that drive their locational decisions on a regional scale, weighing the comparative merits of metropolitan areas against each other. And local governments are increasingly recognizing that they need to work together at a regional scale to compete for these residents.This Article argues that this intermetropolitan mobility provides a novel justification for regionalism that counterbalances the strong localist tendency of the traditional Tieboutian view of local governance. Contrary to the predominant assumption in the legal literature, competition for mobile residents is as much an argument for regionalism as it has been for devolution and decentralization. In an era of global cities vying for talent, the mobility case for regionalism has significant doctrinal consequences for debates in local government law and public finance, including the scope of local authority, the nature of regional equity, and the structure of metropolitan collaboration

    First Record of \u3ci\u3eHarpalus Ochropus\u3c/i\u3e Kirby (Coleoptera: Carabidae) From Minnesota and the Conterminous United States

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    (excerpt) The epigeal ground beetle Harpalus ochropus Kirby (Coleoptera: Carabidae) has been reported from Alaska and across Canada from British Columbia into Quebec (Bousquet and Larochelle 1993). It is local and rarely collected. Gandhi et al. (2005) surveyed for carabids extensively for several years along the Gunflint Trail and adjacent Boundary Waters Canoe Area in northeastern Minnesota

    Semiclassical description of the kinematically complete experiments

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    Based on the semiclassical, impact parameter method a theoretical model is constructed to calculate totally differential cross sections for single ionization of helium by impact with fast C6+^{6+} ions. Good agreement with the experiment is achieved in the scattering plane, while in the perpendicular plane a similar structure to that observed experimentally is obtained. The contribution of different partial waves to the cross section is also investigated.Comment: 9 pages, 6 figure

    The drag of a body moving transversely in a confined stratified fluid

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    The slow motion of a body through a stratified fluid bounded laterally by insulating walls is studied for both large and small Peclet number. The Taylor column and its associated boundary and shear layers are very different from the analogous problem in a rotating fluid. In particular, the large Peclet number problem is non-linear and exhibits mixing of statically unstable fluid layers, and hence the drag is order one; whereas the small Peclet number flow is everywhere stable, and the drag is of the order of the Peclet number

    The Mobility Case for Regionalism

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    In the discourse of local government law, the idea that a mobile populace can “vote with its feet” has long served as a justification for devolution and decentralization. Tracing to Charles Tiebout’s seminal work in public finance, the legal-structural prescription that follows is that a diversity of independent and empowered local governments can best satisfy the varied preferences of residents metaphorically shopping for bundles of public services, regulatory environment, and tax burden. This localist paradigm generally presumes that fragmented governments are competing for residents within a given metropolitan area. Contemporary patterns of mobility, however, call into question this foundational assumption. People today move between — and not just within — metropolitan regions, domestically and even internationally. This is particularly so for a subset of residents — high human-capital knowledge workers and the so-called “creative class” — that is prominently coveted in this interregional competition. These modern mobile residents tend to evaluate the policy bundles that drive their locational decisions on a regional scale, weighing the comparative merits of metropolitan areas against each other. And local governments are increasingly recognizing that they need to work together at a regional scale to compete for these residents.This Article argues that this intermetropolitan mobility provides a novel justification for regionalism that counterbalances the strong localist tendency of the traditional Tieboutian view of local governance. Contrary to the predominant assumption in the legal literature, competition for mobile residents is as much an argument for regionalism as it has been for devolution and decentralization. In an era of global cities vying for talent, the mobility case for regionalism has significant doctrinal consequences for debates in local government law and public finance, including the scope of local authority, the nature of regional equity, and the structure of metropolitan collaboration
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