31 research outputs found

    12-Month Outcomes of the US Patient Cohort in the SONATA Pivotal IDE Trial of Transcervical Ablation of Uterine Fibroids.

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    Objective: The prospective SONATA pivotal Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) trial was performed in the United States (US) and Mexico to examine the safety and effectiveness of transcervical fibroid ablation (TFA) in the treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids. This is an analysis of 12-month clinical outcomes in the US cohort. Methods: TFA with the Sonata System was performed on women with symptomatic uterine fibroids. The 12-month co-primary endpoints were reduction in menstrual blood loss and freedom from surgical reintervention. Symptom severity, quality of life, patient satisfaction, safety, and reductions in uterine and fibroid volumes were also evaluated. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients were enrolled and treated in the US. Both co-primary endpoints were achieved in this US-based cohort, as 65.3% of patients reported ≥50% reduction in menstrual bleeding and 99.2% of patients were free from surgical reintervention. Symptom improvement was noted by 97.4% of patients and 98.3% were satisfied. Ninety-five percent of patients reported reduced menstrual bleeding at 12 months, and 86.8% noted \u3e20% reduction. Significant mean improvements at 12 months were realized in both symptom severity and health-related quality of life (33.8 points and 45.8 points, respectively; all P\u3c0.0001). Mean maximal fibroid volume reduction per patient was 63.8%. There was a 0% incidence of device related adverse events. Mean length of stay was 2.5 hrs and 50% of patients returned to normal activity within 1 day. Conclusion: This analysis of US patients in the SONATA pivotal IDE trial demonstrates results consistent with those in the full cohort. TFA with Sonata significantly reduced fibroid symptoms with a low surgical reintervention rate through 12 months. These results support the efficacy and safety of the Sonata system as a first-line treatment for women affected by symptomatic uterine fibroids

    Enhancing interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education in women\u27s health

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    This article is from the \u27To The Point\u27 series from the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee. The purpose of this review is to provide an understanding of the differing yet complementary nature of interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education as well as their importance to the specialty of Obstetrics and Gynecology. We provide a historical perspective of how interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education have become key aspects of clinical and educational programs, enhancing both patient care and learner development. Opportunities to incorporate interprofessional education within women\u27s health educational programs across organizations are suggested. This is a resource for medical educators, learners, and practicing clinicians from any field of medicine or any health-care profession

    Pelvic and breast examination skills curricula in United States medical schools: a survey of obstetrics and gynecology clerkship directors

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    Background: Learning to perform pelvic and breast examinations produces anxiety for many medical students. Clerkship directors have long sought strategies to help students become comfortable with the sensitive nature of these examinations. Incorporating standardized patients, simulation and gynecologic teaching associates (GTAs) are approaches gaining widespread use. However, there is a paucity of literature guiding optimal approach and timing. Our primary objective was to survey obstetrics and gynecology (Ob/Gyn) clerkship directors regarding timing and methods for teaching and assessment of pelvic and breast examination skills in United States medical school curricula, and to assess clerkship director satisfaction with current educational strategies at their institutions. Methods: Ob/Gyn clerkship directors from all 135 Liaison Committee on Medical Education accredited allopathic United States medical schools were invited to complete an anonymous 15-item web-based questionnaire. Results: The response rate was 70%. Pelvic and breast examinations are most commonly taught during the second and third years of medical school. Pelvic examinations are primarily taught during the Ob/Gyn and Family Medicine (FM) clerkships, while breast examinations are taught during the Ob/Gyn, Surgery and FM clerkships. GTAs teach pelvic and breast examinations at 72 and 65% of schools, respectively. Over 60% of schools use some type of simulation to teach examination skills. Direct observation by Ob/Gyn faculty is used to evaluate pelvic exam skills at 87% of schools and breast exam skills at 80% of schools. Only 40% of Ob/Gyn clerkship directors rated pelvic examination training as excellent, while 18% rated breast examination training as excellent. Conclusions: Pelvic and breast examinations are most commonly taught during the Ob/Gyn clerkship using GTAs, simulation trainers and clinical patients, and are assessed by direct faculty observation during the Ob/Gyn clerkship. While the majority of Ob/Gyn clerkship directors were not highly satisfied with either pelvic or breast examination training programs, they were less likely to describe their breast examination training programs as excellent as compared to pelvic examination training—overall suggesting an opportunity for improvement. The survey results will be useful in identifying future challenges in teaching such skills in a cost-effective manner. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12909-016-0835-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

    CREOG In-Training Exam Results: A Contemporary Use To Predict ABOG Written Examination Outcome

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    The Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology (CREOG) In-Training Examination (ITE) was designed to serve as a tool to provide feedback on resident progress along with training program strengths and weaknesses

    CREOG In-Training Exam Results: Identifying Predictive Factors

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    The Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology (CREOG) In-Training Examination (ITE) was designed to serve as a tool to provide feedback on resident progress along with training program strengths and weaknesses

    CREOG In-Training Examination Results: Contemporary Use to Predict ABOG Written Examination Outcomes.

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    BACKGROUND: The in-training examination (ITE) offers formative assessments of residents\u27 developing medical knowledge. Identification of an ITE performance level associated with success on the specialty board examination allows identification of at risk residents. OBJECTIVE: This study sought to identify a threshold score for obstetrics and gynecology residents\u27 performance on the Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology (CREOG) ITE that predicts successful performance on the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG) written examination. METHODS: We analyzed ITE and ABOG results of 80 residents who completed 4 years of CREOG ITEs at 2 institutions between 2002 and 2012. We assessed the level of performance associated with successful performance on the ABOG written examination. RESULTS: Data analyzed included scores for 71 of 80 residents (89%), with an overall pass rate of 82%. A postgraduate year (PGY) 4 score of 200 on the CREOG ITE or twice in any of the PGY training years was associated with a 100% ABOG pass rate. Scoring ≥ 205 in any PGY also was associated with a 100% pass rate. Residents who did not attain a score of 200 had a 35% to 45% chance of failing the ABOG written examination, depending on the PGY of the ITE performance. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a CREOG ITE score of at least 200 twice, or as a PGY-4, offers assurance of successful performance on the ABOG examination. Scores lower than this threshold may be used to identify at risk residents for added learning and provide program elements in need of improvement
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