11 research outputs found

    Alternative Policies with Complementary Benefits: Targeting Greenhouse Emissions or Water Recharge on Farming Systems?

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    Policies introduced to address one environmental objective can often have the side-benefit of also addressing other environmental objectives. This analysis uses a whole farm bioeconomic model to explore the farm level implications, economic and environmental, of a policy initially designed to reduce greenhouse emissions. We model a regulatory policy which imposes an upper limit on farm greenhouse emissions but allows trees to be used as carbon sinks to offset emissions. The implementation of this policy causes a reduction in whole farm profit, but in addition to decreasing emissions it also decreases groundwater recharge from the farming system and therefore contributes to the prevention of dryland salinity. The analysis compares this approach with using a recharge restriction policy to achieve recharge and emissions reductions. The analysis finds that the position of trees in the landscape affects the extent to which groundwater recharge can be reduced for a given reduction in emissions and that there is a three-way trade-off between profit, emissions reduction and recharge.Environmental Economics and Policy,

    Crop Updates 2007 - Cereals

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    This session covers twenty six papers from different authors: CEREAL BREEDING 1. Strategies for aligning producer and market imperatives in cereal breeding in Western Australia, R. Loughman, R. Lance, I. Barclay, G. Crosbie, S. Harasymow, W. Lambe, C. Li, R. McLean, C. Moore, K. Stefanova, A. Tarr and R. Wilson, Department of Agriculture and Food 2. LongReach plant breeders wheat variety trials – 2006, Matu Peipi and Matt Whiting, LongReach Plant Breeders WHEAT AGRONOMY 3. Response of wheat varieties to sowing time in the northern agricultural region in 2006, Christine Zaicou, Department of Agriculture and Food 4. Response of wheat varieties to sowing time in the central agricultural region in 2006, Shahajahan Miyan, Department of Agriculture and Food 5. Response of wheat varieties to sowing time in the Great Southern and Lakes region, Brenda Shackleyand Ian Hartley, Department of Agriculture and Food 6. Response of wheat varieties to time of sowing time in Esperance region in 2006, Christine Zaicou, Ben Curtis and Ian Hartley, Department of Agriculture and Food 7. Performance of wheat varieties in National Variety Testing (NVT) WA: Year 2, Peter Burgess, Agritech Crop Research 8. Flowering dates of wheat varieties in Western Australia in 2006, Darshan Sharma, Brenda Shackley and Christine Zaicou, Department of Agriculture and Food 9. Prospects for perennial wheat: A feasibility study, Len J. Wade, Lindsay W. Bell, Felicity Byrne (nee Flugge) and Mike A. Ewing, School of Plant Biology and CRC for Plant-based Management of Dryland Salinity, The University of Western Australia BARLEY AGRONOMY 10. Barley agronomy highlights: Time of sowing x variety, Blakely Paynter and Andrea Hills, Department of Agriculture and Food 11. Barley agronomy highlights: Weeds and row spacing, Blakely Paynter and Andrea Hills, Department of Agriculture and Food 12. Barley agronomy highlights: Weeds and barley variety, Blakely Paynter and Andrea Hills, Department of Agriculture and Food OAT AGRONOMY 13. Agronomic performance of dwarf potential milling oat varieties in varied environments of WA, Raj Malik, Blakely Paynter and Kellie Winfield, Department of Agriculture and Food 14. Sourcing oat production information in 2007, Kellie Winfield, Department of Agriculture and Food HERBICIDE TOLERANCE 15. Response of new wheat varieties to herbicides, Harmohinder Dhammu, Department of Agriculture and Food 16. Herbicide tolerance of new barley varieties, Harmohinder Dhammu, Vince Lambert and Chris Roberts, Department of Agriculture and Food 17. Herbicide tolerance of new oat varieties, Harmohinder Dhammu, Vince Lambert and Chris Roberts, Department of Agriculture and Food NUTRITION 18. Nitrogen Decision Tools – choose your weapon, Jeremy Lemon, Department of Agriculture and Food DISEASES 19. Barley agronomy highlights: Canopy management, Andrea Hills and Blakely Paynter, Department of Agriculture and Food 20. Barley agronomy highlights: Leaf diseases and spots, Andrea Hills and Blakely Paynter, Department of Agriculture and Food 21. Fungicide applications for stripe rust management in adult plant resistant (APR) wheat varieties, Geoff Thomas, Rob Loughman, Ian Hartley and Andrew Taylor; Department of Agriculture and Food 22. Effect of seed treatment with Jockey on time of onset and disease severity of stripe rust in wheat, Manisha Shankar, John Majewski and Rob Loughman, Department of Agriculture and Food 23. Rotations for management of Cereal Cyst Nematode, Vivien Vanstone, Department of Agriculture and Food 24. Occurrence of Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus in Western Australian grainbelt during the 2006 growing season, Brenda Coutts, Monica Kehoe and Roger Jones, Department of Agriculture and Food 25. Development of a seed test for Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus in bulk samples of wheat, Geoffrey Dwyer, Belinda Welsh, Cuiping Wang and Roger Jones, Department of Agriculture and Food MARKETS 26. Developing the Australian barley value chain, Linda Price, Barley Australi

    Crop Updates 2002 - Oilseeds

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    This session covers twenty seven papers from different authors: 1. Forward and acknowledgements, Dave Eksteen, ACTING MANAGER OILSEEDS PRODUCTIVITY AND INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT Department of Agriculture PLENARY SESSION 2. GMO canola - Track record in Canada, K. Neil Harker and George W. Clayton,Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lacombe Research Centre, Lacombe, Alberta, R. Keith Downey, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon Research Centre, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan 3. GMO canola – Prospects in Western Australia farming systems, Keith Alcock, Crop Improvement Institute, Department of Agriculture 4. Diamondback moth (DBM) in canola, Kevin Walden, Department of Agriculture CANOLA AGRONOMY 5. Getting the best out of canola in the low rainfall central wheatbelt, Bevan Addison and Peter Carlton, Elders Ltd 6. Canola variety performance in Western Australia, Kevin Morthorpe, Stephen Addenbrooke and Alex Ford, Pioneer Hi-Bred Australia P/L 7. Relative performance of new canola varieties in Department of Agriculture variety trials in 2000 and 2001, S. Hasan Zaheer, GSARI, Department of Agriculture, G. Walton, Crop Improvement Institute, Department of Agriculture 8. Which canola cultivar should I sow? Imma Farré, CSIRO Plant Industry, Floreat, Bill Bowden,Western Australia Department of Agriculture 9. The effect of seed generation and seed source on yield and quality of canola, Paul Carmody, Department of Agriculture 10. The accumulation of oil in Brassica species, J.A. Fortescue and D.W. Turner, Plant Biology, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Western Australia, B. Tan, PO Box 1249, South Perth 11. Potential and performance of alternative oilseeds in WA, Margaret C. Campbell, Centre for Legumes in Mediterranean Agriculture 12. Comparison of oilseed crops in WA, Ian Pritchard and Paul Carmody, Department of Agriculture, Centre for Cropping Systems, Margaret Campbell, Centre for Legumes in Mediterranean Agriculture 13. Identifying constraints to canola production, Dave Eksteen, Canola Development Officer, Department of Agriculture 14. Boron – should we be worried about it? Richard W. BellA, K. FrostA, Mike WongB, and Ross BrennanC , ASchool of Environmental Science, Murdoch University, BCSIRO Land and Water, CDepartment of Agriculture PEST AND DISEASE 15. Yield losses caused when Beet Western Yellows Virus infects canola, Roger Jones and Jenny Hawkes, Department of Agriculture, and Centre for Legumes in Mediterranean Agriculture 16. Influence of climate on aphid outbreaks and virus epidemics in canola, Debbie Thackray, Jenny Hawkes and Roger Jones, Centre for Legumes in Mediterranean Agriculture and Department of Agriculture 17. The annual shower of blackleg ascospores in canola: Can we predict and avoid it? Moin U. Salam, Ravjit K. Khangura, Art J. Diggle and Martin J. Barbetti, Department of Agriculture 18. Environmental influences on production and release of ascospores of blackleg and their implications in blackleg management in canola, Ravjit K. Khangura, Martin J. Barbetti , Moin U. Salam and Art J. Diggle, Department of Agriculture 19. WA blackleg resistance ratings on canola varieties form 2002, Ravjit Khangura, Martin J. Barbetti and Graham Walton, Department of Agriculture 20. Bronzed field beetle management in canola, Phil Michael, Department of Agriculture 21. DBM control in canola: Aerial versus boom application, Paul Carmody, Department of Agriculture 22. Effect of single or multiple spray trearments on the control of Diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) and yield of canola at Wongan Hills, Françoise Berlandier, Paul Carmody and Christiaan Valentine, Department of Agriculture ESTABLISHMENT 23. GrainGuardÔ - A biosecurity plan for the canola industry, Greg Shea, Department of Agriculture 24. Large canola seed is best, particularly for deep sowing, Glen Riethmuller, Rafiul Alam, Greg Hamilton and Jo Hawksley, Department of Agriculture 25. Canola establishment with seed size, tines and discs, with and without stubble, Glen Riethmuller, Rafiul Alam, Greg Hamilton and Jo Hawksley, Department of Agriculture WEEDS 26. Role of Roundup ReadyÒ canola in the farming system, Art Diggle1, Patrick Smith2, Paul Neve3, Felicity Flugge4, Amir Abadi5, Stephen Powles3 1Department of Agriculture, 2CSIRO, Sustainable Ecosystems, 3Western Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative, University of Western Australia, 4Centre for Legumes in Mediterranean Agriculture, University of Western Australia, 5Touchstone Consulting, Mt Hawthorn FEED 27. Getting value from canola meals in the animal feed industries: Aquaculture, Brett Glencross and John Curnow, Department of Fisheries - Government of Western Australia and Wayne Hawkins, Department of Agricultur

    Crop Updates 2002 - Weeds

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    This session covers fifty eight papers from different authors: 1. INTRODUCTION Vanessa Stewart, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTEGRATED WEED MANAGEMENT IWM system studies / demonstration sites 2. Major outcomes from IWM demonstration sites, Alexandra Douglas Department of Agriculture 3. Integrated weed management: Katanning, Alexandra Douglas Department of Agriculture 4. Integrated weed management: Merredin, Vanessa Stewart Department of Agriculture 5. Long term resistance site: Get ryegrass numbers low and keep them low! Peter Newman and Glen Adams Department of Agriculture 6. Using pastures to manage ryegrass populations, Andrew Blake and Natalie Lauritsen Department of Agriculture Weed biology and competition 7. Understanding the weed seed bank life if important agricultural weeds, Sally Peltzer and Paul Matson Department of Agriculture 8. Consequence of radish competition on lupin nutrients in wheat-lupin rotation, Abul Hashem and Nerys Wilkins Department of Agriculture 9. Consequence of ryegrass competition on lupin nutrients in a wheat-lupin rotation, Abul Hashem and Nerys Wilkins Department of Agriculture 10. Brome grass too competitive for early sown wheat in a dry year at Mullewa, Peter Newman and Glenn Adam Department of Agriculture Crop establishment and weed management 11. Seeding rate, row spacing and herbicides for weed control, David Minkey Department of Agriculture 12. Effect of different seeding methods on wheat and ryegrass, Abul Hashem, Glen Riethmuller and Nerys Wilkins Department of Agriculture 13. Role of tillage implements and trifluralin on the effectiveness of the autumn tickle for stimulating annual ryegrass emergence, Tim Cusack1, Kathryn Steadman1 and Abul Hashem2,1Western Australia Herbicide Resistance Initiative, UWA; 2Department of Agriculture, 14. Timing of autumn tickle in important for non-wetting soils, Pippa Michael1, Peter Newman2 and Kathryn Steadman 2, 1Western Australia Herbicide Resistance Initiative, UWA, 2Department of Agriculture 15. Early investigation into weed seed burial by mouldboard plough, Sally Peltzer and Alex Douglas Department of Agriculture 16. Rolling post-emergent lupins to improve weed emergence and control on loamy sand, Paul Blackwell, Department of Agriculture and Dave Brindal, Strawberry via Mingenew IWM tools 17. Crop topping in 2001: How did we do? Peter Newman and Glenn Adam Department of Agriculture 18. Wickwipers work! Peter Newman and Glenn Adam Department of Agriculture 19. Wild radish and ryegrass seed collection at harvest: Chaff carts and other devices, Michael Walsh Western Australia Herbicide Resistance Initiative, UWA and Wayne Parker Department of Agriculture 20. Improving weed control in grazed pastures using legumes with low palatability, Clinton Revell, Giles Glasson Department of Agriculture, and Dean Thomas Faculty of Agriculture, University of Western Australia Adoption and modelling 21. Grower weed survey, Peter Newman and Glenn Adam Department of Agriculture 22. Agronomist survey, Peter Newman and Glenn Adam Department of Agriculture 23. Ryegrass RIM model stands the test of IWM field trial data, Alister Draper Western Australia Herbicide Resistance Initiative, UWA and Bill Roy, Western Australia Herbicide Resistance Initiative, UWA Agricultural Consulting and Research Services 24. Multi-species RIM: An update, Marta Monjardin1,2, David Pannell2 and Stephen Powles 1, 1Western Australia Herbicide Resistance Initiative, UWA, 2 ARE, University of Western Australia 25. RIM survey feedback, Robert Barrett-Lennard and Alister Draper Western Australia Herbicide Resistance Initiative, UWA 26. Effect of historic input and product prices on choice of ryegrass management strategies, Alister Draper1 and Martin Bent2, 1Western Australia Herbicide Resistance Initiative, UWA, 2Muresk Institute of Agriculture 27. Living with ryegrass – trading off weed control and economic performance, Martin Bent1 and Alister Draper2 , 1Muresk Institute of Agriculture, Curtin University, 2Western Australia Herbicide Resistance Initiative, UWA HERBICIDE RESISTANCE 28. Glyphosate resistance in WA and Australia: Where are we at? Paul Neve1, Art Diggle2, Patrick Smith3, Mechelle Owen1, Abul Hashem2, Christopher Preston4and Stephen Powles1,1Western Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative, University of Western Australia, 2Department of Agriculture, 3CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems, 4CRC for Australian Weed Management and Department of Applied and Molecular Ecology, Waite Campus, University of Adelaide 29. We need you weeds: A survey of knockdown resistance in the WA wheatbelt, Paul Neve1, Mechelle Owen1, Abul Hashem2 and Stephen Powles1 1Western Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative, University of Western Australia, 2Department of Agriculture 30. A test for resistance testing, Mechelle Owen, Tracey Gillam, Rick Llewellyn and Steve Powles,Western Australia Herbicide Resistance Initiative, University of Western Australia 31. In field testing for herbicide resistance, a purpose built multi-treatment spray boom with results from 2001, Richard Quinlan, Elders Ltd 32. Advantages and limitations of a purpose built multi-treatment spray boom, Richard Quinlan, Elders Ltd 33. Group F resistant wild radish: What’s new? Aik Cheam, Siew Lee Department of Agriculture, and Mike Clarke Aventis Crop Science 34. Cross resistance of Brodal® resistant wild radish to Sniper®, Aik Cheam and Siew Lee, Department of Agriculture 35. Managing a biotype of wild radish with Group F and Group C resistance, Aik Cheam, Siew Lee, David Nicholson, Peter Newman Department of Agriculture and Mike Clarke, Aventis Crop Science HERBICIDE TOLERANCE 36. Herbicide tolerance of new wheat varieties, Harmohinder S. Dhammu, Terry Piper and David Nicholson, Agriculture Western Australia 37. Response of barley varieties to herbicides, Harmohinder S. Dhammu, Terry Piper, Department of Agriculture 38. Tolerance of barley to phenoxy herbicides, Harmohinder S. Dhammu, Terry Piper, Department of Agriculture and Chad Sayer, Nufarm Australia Limited 39. Response of Durum wheats to herbicides, Harmohinder S. Dhammu, Terry Piper, Department of Agriculture 40. Response of new field pea varieties to herbicides, Harmohinder S. Dhammu, Terry Piper and David Nicholson, Department of Agriculture 41. Herbicide tolerance of Desi chickpeas on marginal soil, Harmohinder S. Dhammu, Terry Piper and David Nicholson, Department of Agriculture 42. Herbicide tolerance of newer lupin varieties, Terry Piper, Harmohinder Dhammu and David Nicholson, Department of Agriculture 43. Herbicide tolerance of some annual pasture legumes, Clinton Revell and Ian Rose, Department of Agriculture 44. Herbicide tolerance of pasture legumes, Andrew Blake, Department of Agriculture HERBICIDES – NEW PRODUCTS/PRODUCT USES; USE 45. Knockdown herbicides do not reliably kill small grass weeds, Peter Newman and Glenn Adam, Department of Agriculture 46. ‘Hair Cutting’ wheat with Spray.Seed®: Does it work? Peter Newman and Glenn Adam, Department of Agriculture 47. ‘Haircutting’: Does the number one cut work? Robert Barrett-Lennard1 and Jerome Critch2,1WA Herbicide Resistance Initiative, University of WA, 2Student, University of WA 48. Hammer EC (Carfentrazone-ethyl): A mixing partner for glyphosate to enhance the control of difficult broadleaf weeds, Gordon R. Cumming, Crop Care Australasia 49. Marshmallow control in reduced tillage systems, Sam Taylor, Wesfarmers Landmark 50. Herbicide options for summer germinating marshmallow, Vanessa Stewart, Department of Agriculture 51. Dual Gold® safe in a dry year at Coorow, Peter Newman and Glenn Adam, Department of Agriculture 52. The effect of glyphosate, paraquat and diquat as a crop topping application on the germination of barley, John Moore and Roslyn Jettner, Department of Agriculture 53. Herbicide options for melon control, Vanessa Stewart, Department of Agriculture 54. Herbicide options for the control of Chloris truncate (windmill grass) Vanessa Stewart, Department of Agriculture 55. Allelopathic effects of crop, pasture and weed residues on subsequent crop and pasture establishment, Stuart Bee1, Lionel Martin1, Keith Devenish2 and Terry Piper2, 1Muresk Institute of Agriculture, Curtin University of Technology, Northam, Western Australia, 2Centre for Cropping Systems, Department of Agriculture WEED ISSUES 56. Role of Roundup ReadyÒ canola in the farming system, Art Diggle1, Patrick Smith2, Paul Neve3, Felicity Flugge4, Amir Abadi5 and Stephen Powles3, 1Department of Agriculture; 2CSIRO, Sustainable Ecosystems; 3Western Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative; 4Centre for Legumes in Mediterranean Agriculture; 5Touchstone Consulting 57. ’Weeds for Feed’ and livestock enterprise structures: A feasibility study and farmer survey in the north-easern wheatbelt, Duncan Peter and Stuart McAlpine, Department of Agriculture and Liebe Group, Buntine 58. e-weed, Vanessa Stewart, Agriculture Western Australi

    Agribusiness Sheep Updates - 2004 part 2

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    Precision Pastures Using Species Diversity to Improve Pasture Performance Anyou Liu and Clinton Revell, Department of Agriculture, Western Australia New Annual Pasture Legumes for Sheep Graziers Phil Nichols, Angelo Loi, Brad Nutt and Darryl McClements Department of Agriculture Western Australia Pastures from Space – Can Satellite Estimates of Pasture Growth Rate be used to Increase Farm Profit? Lucy Anderton, Stephen Gherardi and Chris Oldham Department of Agriculture Western Australia Summer-active Perennial Grasses for Profitable Sheep Production Paul Sanford and John Gladman, Department of Agriculture, Western Australia Pastures From Space – Validation Of Predictions Of Pasture Growth Rates DONALD, G.E.A, EDIRISINGHE, A.A, HENRY, D.A.A, MATA, G.A, GHERARDI, S.G.B, OLDHAM, C.M.B, GITTINS, S.P.B AND SMITH, R. C. G.C ACSIRO, Livestock Industries, PMB 5, Wembley, WA, 6913. BDepartment of Agriculture Western Australia, Bentley, WA, 6983. C Department of Land Information Western Australia, Floreat, WA, 6214. Production and Management of Biserrula Pasture - Managing the Risk of Photosensitivity Dr Clinton Revell and Roy Butler, Department of Agriculture Western Australia Meat Quality of Sheep Grazed on a Saltbush-based Pasture Kelly Pearce1,2, David Masters1, David Pethick2, 1 CSIRO LIVESTOCK INDUSTRIES, WEMBLEY, WA 2 SCHOOL OF VETERINARY AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE, MURDOCH UNIVERSITY, MURDOCH, WA Precision Sheep Lifetime Wool – Carryover Effects on Subsequent Reproduction of the Ewe Flock Chris Oldham, Department of Agriculture Western Australia Andrew Thompson, Primary Industries Research Victoria (PIRVic), Dept of Primary Industries, Hamilton, Vic Ewe Productivity Trials - a Linked Analysis Ken Hart, Johan Greeff, Department of Agriculture Western Australia, Beth Paganoni, School of Animal Biology, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, University of Western Australia. Grain Finishing Systems For Prime Lambs Rachel Kirby, Matt Ryan, Kira Buttler, Department of Agriculture, Western Australia The Effects of Nutrition and Genotype on the Growth and Development, Muscle Biochemistry and Consumer Response to Lamb Meat David Pethick, Department of Veterinary Science, Murdoch University, WA, Roger Heggarty and David Hopkins, New South Wales Agriculture ‘Lifetime Wool’ - Effects of Nutrition During Pregnancy and Lactation on Mortality of Progeny to Hogget Shearing Samantha Giles, Beth Paganoni and Tom Plaisted, Department of Agriculture Western Australia, Mark Ferguson and Darren Gordon, Primary Industries Research Victoria (PIRVic), Dept of Primary Industries, Hamilton, Vic Lifetime Wool - Target Liveweights for the Ewe Flock J. Young, Farming Systems Analysis Service, Kojonup, C. Oldham, Department of Agriculture Western Australia, A. Thompson, Primary Industries Research Victoria (PIRVic), Hamilton, VIC Lifetime Wool - Effects of Nutrition During Pregnancy and Lactation on the Growth and Wool Production of their Progeny at Hogget Shearing B. Paganoni, University of Western Australia, Nedlands WA, C. Oldham, Department of Agriculture Western Australia, M. Ferguson, A. Thompson, Primary Industries Research Victoria (PIRVic), Hamilton, VIC RFID Technology – Esperance Experiences Sandra Brown, Department of Agriculture Western Australia The Role of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Technology in Prime Lamb Production - a Case Study. Ian McFarland, Department of Agriculture, Western Australia. John Archer, Producer, Narrogin, Western Australia Win with Twins from Merinos John Milton, Rob Davidson, Graeme Martin and David Lindsay The University of Western Australia Precision Sheep Need Precision Wool Harvesters Jonathan England, Castle Carrock Merinos, Kingston SE, South Australia Business EBVs and Indexes – Genetic Tools for your Toolbox Sandra Brown, Department of Agriculture Western Australia Green Feed Budget Paddock Calculator Mandy Curnow, Department of Agriculture Western Australia Minimising the Impact of Drought - Evaluating Flock Recovery Options using the ImPack Model Karina P. Wood, Ashley K. White, B. Lloyd Davies, Paul M. Carberry, NSW Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI), Lifetime Wool - Modifying GrazFeed® for WA Mike Hyder, Department of Agriculture Western Australia , Mike Freer, CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, A.C.T. , Andrew van Burgel, and Kazue Tanaka, Department of Agriculture Western Australia Profile Calculator – A Way to Manage Fibre Diameter Throughout the Year to Maximise Returns Andrew Peterson, Department of Agriculture, Western Australia Pasture Watch - a Farmer Friendly Tool for Downloading and Analysing Pastures from Space Data Roger Wiese,Fairport Technologies International, South Perth, WA, Stephen Gherardi, BDepartment of Agriculture Western Australia, Gonzalo Mata, CCSIRO, Livestock Industries, Wembley, Western Australia, and Chris Oldham, Department of Agriculture Western Australia Sy Sheep Cropping Systems An Analysis of a Cropping System Containing Sheep in a Low Rainfall Livestock System. Evan Burt, Amanda Miller, Anne Bennett, Department of Agriculture, Western Australia Lucerne-based Pasture for the Central Wheatbelt – is it Good Economics? Felicity FluggeA, Amir AbadiA,B and Perry DollingA,B,A CRC for Plant-based Management of Dryland Salinity: BDept. of Agriculture, WA Sheep and Biserrula can Control Annual Ryegrass Dean Thomas, John Milton, Mike Ewing and David Lindsay, The University of WA, Clinton Revell, Department of Agriculture, Western Australia Sustainable Management Pasture Utilisation, Fleece Weight and Weaning Rate are Integral to the Profitability of Dohnes and SAMMs. Emma Kopke,Department of Agriculture Western Australia, John Young, Farming Systems Analysis Service Environmental Impact of Sheep Confinement Feeding Systems E A Dowling and E K Crossley, Department of Agriculture, Western Australia Smart Grazing Management for Production and Environmental Outcomes Dr Brien E (Ben) Norton, Centre for the Management of Arid Environments, Curtin University of Technology, WA Common Causes of Plant Poisoning in the Eastern Wheatbelt of Western Australia. Roy Butler, Department of Agriculture, Western Australia Selecting Sheep for Resistance to Worms and Production Trait Responses John Karlsson, Johan Greeff, Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Geoff Pollott, Imperial College, London UK Production and Water Use of Lucerne and French Serradella in Four Soil Types, Diana Fedorenko1,4, Darryl McClements2,4 and Robert Beard3,4, 12Department of Agriculture, Western Australia; 3Farmer, Meckering; 4CRC for Plant-based Management of Dryland Salinity. Worm Burdens in Sheep at Slaughter Brown Besier, Department of Agriculture Western Australia, Una Ryan, Caroline Bath, Murdoch Universit

    Alternative Policies with Complementary Benefits: Targeting Greenhouse Emissions or Water Recharge on Farming Systems?

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    Policies introduced to address one environmental objective can often have the side-benefit of also addressing other environmental objectives. This analysis uses a whole farm bioeconomic model to explore the farm level implications, economic and environmental, of a policy initially designed to reduce greenhouse emissions. We model a regulatory policy which imposes an upper limit on farm greenhouse emissions but allows trees to be used as carbon sinks to offset emissions. The implementation of this policy causes a reduction in whole farm profit, but in addition to decreasing emissions it also decreases groundwater recharge from the farming system and therefore contributes to the prevention of dryland salinity. The analysis compares this approach with using a recharge restriction policy to achieve recharge and emissions reductions. The analysis finds that the position of trees in the landscape affects the extent to which groundwater recharge can be reduced for a given reduction in emissions and that there is a three-way trade-off between profit, emissions reduction and recharge

    Greenhouse Gas Abatement Policies and the Value of Carbon Sinks: Do Grazing and Cropping Systems have Different Destinies?

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    The impact of two greenhouse gas abatement policies on two Mediterranean-type farming systems, grazing dominant and cropping dominant, is examined. The policies analysed are; an emissions taxation policy and an emissions restrictions policy. For both farming systems the restriction policy is found to be more effective and economically efficient than the carbon permit policy. Absolute cost of abatement is less for the livestock dominant system but relative cost is greater, because of lower total farm profits. The analysis found that at predicted emissions permit prices, trees, if credited as a carbon sink, would be adopted by both farming systems to offset farm greenhouse gas emissions

    A preliminary whole-farm economic analysis of perennial wheat in an Australian dryland farming system

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    The development of perennial wheat could have a number of advantages for improving the sustainability of Australian dryland agricultural systems. The profitability that might be expected from perennial wheat of different types was investigated using MIDAS (Model of an Integrated Dryland Agricultural System), a bioeconomic model of a mixed crop/livestock farming system. Although perennial wheat may produce a lower grain yield and quality than annual wheat, it is expected inputs of fertiliser, herbicide and sowing costs will be lower. Perennial wheat used solely for grain production was not selected as part of an optimal farm plan under the standard assumptions. In contrast, dual-purpose perennial wheat that produces grain and additional forage during summer and autumn than annual wheat can increase farm profitability substantially (AU$20/ha over the whole farm) and 20% of farm area was selected on the optimal farm plan under standard assumptions. Forage from perennial wheat replaced stubble over summer and grain supplement at the break of season and increased farm stock numbers. The additional value added by grazing also reduced the relative yield required for perennial wheat to be profitable. This analysis suggests perennial wheat used for the dual purposes of grain and forage production could be developed as a profitable option for mixed crop/livestock producers
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